Picking up the Africa twin

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by gve.mcmlxxiv, Sep 14, 2019.

  1. gve.mcmlxxiv

    gve.mcmlxxiv Been here awhile

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    Went down three times today. This video sums up my experience. Luckily I had a ratchet strap and trees or I would still be there. Anyone have an easier way?
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  2. Kommando

    Kommando Long timer

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    Lighter bike, hit the gym, and/or always ride with others.

    This is why many people have been clamoring for lighter adv motos like the Tenere 700, or even lighter. If you're likely to dump it due to challenging riding, it stands to reason that a 500lb+ machine doesn't make much sense for mere mortals that ride alone.
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  3. 97707

    97707 Go Long Supporter

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    I've had to pull the panniers off a loaded DR650 to get it picked up, and it weighs 200 pounds less than an AT.

    You see these demos of guys showing techniques for picking up a Harley or a BMW . . . make it look easy in a parking lot. But in the mud or a downhill slope its a lot different.

    Like this guy



    Anyone ever use one of these? Wonder if they are worth carrying.
    https://www.advmotorrad.com/dustriders-motorcycle-hoist


    .
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  4. Muddler

    Muddler Long timer

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    GVE, I thought you were nearly there with your back to bike lift. I wonder if with a little more technique and focus at the critical point of the lift (when you stopped), you might get it. I had to lift my fully loaded AT 3 times in one morning on a sandy track recently. To be honest, I thought I was going to have to remove the top duffel bag first, but I gave it a crack and got it. The key points in my view were: 1/ back to bike; 2/ lifting up, pushing sideways on loose ground is no good; 3/ lock out arm on the handlebar - critical, this arm takes most of load; 4/ good position, slight arch in back, shoulders back more, don’t lean left or right; 4/ with Arms and back locked, lift with legs only - focus on it: legs, legs, legs!!

    This is my bike on the day
    67E935B5-A0B5-4605-9D22-5A40238C599C.jpeg

    Attached Files:

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  5. mentolio

    mentolio Been here awhile

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    Huh, that dustriders hoist is pretty cool to see in action. Looks like it packs-up pretty small, too.
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  6. gve.mcmlxxiv

    gve.mcmlxxiv Been here awhile

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    I love that blacked out AT! You should put some alt-rider lowers on that. 10-4 on hitting the gym. I'm 44 years old and since february I've gone from 215 lbs to 170lbs. almost all of it fat on the Keto diet but I have notice significant strength lost in mainly my back and thighs. I actually started back to the gym two weeks ago and its more of a physical therapy stage right now than muscle gains. I have picked this bike up myself in adverse situations without too much trouble prior to losing weight. my last pickup was in february when I crashed in a 10 foot wide stream that was a foot deep and rushing. the water was cold and it was a high temp of 40F that day. i hit a rock and the suspension rebounded me in such a way that I went sideways. I took a really hard hit to the knee with a river rock when i went down. If I didn't have the leatt dual axis knee and shin protector on I might been have injured badly. After the crash I slipped out from under the bike and lifted it up using the back up to it and grab the handlebar method. it was hard but I did it yelling like a Spartan as I lifted. I got the bike restarted standing in the water. the bike turned over SLOWLY six or seven times trying to start getting slower with every crank and I thought i WAS SCREWED being 20 miles from a highway and alone then Vroom, ignition, water blew out the tailpipe like a geyser, then steam then it got going and I walked it out of the steam and up the bank using the bikes propulsion. This is a good bike but not perfect for everything. I don't think I'll go for a different bike because I also like my highway riding and this one does it so well. After yesterday though I'm questioning my choice of roads. that bike lifter thing looks good. I might get one of those when i can afford it.
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  7. Amphib

    Amphib A mind is like a parachute....

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    I've had to pick mine up probably a half a dozen times so far..... It sucks. I save gnarlier stuff for when riding with a buddy.

    For me it's good knowing multiple techniques because a couple of times, for whatever reason I couldn't get it up the backwards method....same the other way. I'm in decent shape for 47....i work construction.

    Hard luggage helps. Pull it off, lift a little bit, and slide underneath the bike....work the resting position at a more favorable height to finish it off...add logs or whatever else is around...... Of course all bets are off in the water. My back is a big part of my livelihood so while I can muscle it up easier, I need to be careful in technique.

    Yeah its a great bike, but best when not having to lift it solo.
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  8. davidji

    davidji bike curious

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    I expect it would be pretty hard to pick up in muddy terrain. I've dreaded having to pick up a bike in slippery conditions--well I did it once long ago with a much lighter bike and it worked OK. At the least, it seems like my feet and the tires need some purchase on the ground.

    I'm sure doing deadlifts would better prepare you for picking up the AT. I don't, due to back problems, but I do keep fit, and I hope that's enough. I can only imagine if it tipped on a slope where the top was lower than the tires I'd be completely screwed--unless I could tip it another half turn down hill, or spin it around on its side.

    When I see video of small women picking up heavy Harleys it seems to be a bike with wide crashbars, and doesn't go over as far. Easier to get the weight shifted onto the tires.
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  9. neanderthal

    neanderthal globeriding wannabe

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    More squats and deadlifts.

    I haven't been inside a gym (until recently after my accident) in years, but I have had no problem lifting up my bike by myself. Being a fatass former rugby forward helps, i'm sure.
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  10. mentolio

    mentolio Been here awhile

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    A lot of fitness gurus say that a strong core (chest to knees) is the key to doing “real world” stuff like this. I’ve been doing programs that focus less on weights and more on blasting the core for a few years, and at a fairly “busted-up” 49 years old I haven’t yet had a problem picking up my AT the few times it’s “taken a nap.” Even almost saved it once or twice...
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  11. Bushyar15

    Bushyar15 Been here awhile

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    The OP or guy in the video is doing it wrong. His technique is bad. He'll hurt himself. But I feel for him. I have been in situation where I could not lift the bike because of the angle. I couldn't even drag it by the front wheel to swing it around. I'm no weakling. While I'm overweight, I work out with weights. I wound up pulling my traps and quads, trying to lift it.

    I wound up buying one of those ratchet jacks just in case.

    In any case his technique is wrong...
    #11
  12. Moshaholic2

    Moshaholic2 CRF1000L Africa Twin , WR250F

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    Went down in mud yesterday and I was solo
    GOPR0143.JPG

    Was super slick clay with no footing. Even walking on it was like skating.

    Tried the back to bike method first. But with no traction was going nowhere.

    What ended up working in this instance was this.

    Got on my knees facing the bike. Grabbed ghe handle bar in left hand, grab bar in right and lifted.

    That got it about 4-6" off the ground.

    I then transitioned to get one knee up and then got my other knee up and continued to push w/ my legs and lift w/ my arms.

    Bike popped right up. And yes, it was a real mother f&**er to do. Would NOT want to have to do that again solo.
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  13. gve.mcmlxxiv

    gve.mcmlxxiv Been here awhile

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    How? what is it you are seeing?
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  14. nohumdrumlife

    nohumdrumlife Adventurer

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    I've been in heap of trouble on the backside of the La Sal Mts in snow and am now a firm believer in packing the dirt napper on solo trips. I had picked the bike up in normal conditions, but if its slick its a completely different scenerio:
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  15. Bushyar15

    Bushyar15 Been here awhile

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    The idea is NOT to lift it straight up. It's to "walk it" up. Back straight, butt against the seat, legs not under you, but a bit in front of you. You push with your legs with your back/butt on the seat while lifting with your arms. In the video, the OP is trying to do a "squat" type lift. Not correct. The first thing you try to do is get the wheels touching the ground so they offer resistance, so the bike will want to stand up.

    When it is flat like that it does take a bit of "muscle" to get it started and off the ground but if your body is in the correct position you can hold it up just off the ground with leg strength, catch your breath then start walking it up...

    Don't get me wrong, its not easy and I've had to attempt it several times before I get it on it's wheels.



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  16. Muddler

    Muddler Long timer

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    Bushy, I understand that is the advertised technique, but I found it didn’t work on loose ground, your feet just lose traction. For this reason I DID lift straight up. What is essential is correct back posture (posture in top vid is incorrect) and locked out arms so that you are only using your legs to lift.
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  17. gve.mcmlxxiv

    gve.mcmlxxiv Been here awhile

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    That actually helps me understand the technique better. Thanks for explanation. My situation Saturday was the wheels were off the ground and the road wasn’t flat. The wheels were on the uphill side and off the ground. Bark buster was supporting a lot of weight and probably saved my hand lever. I’m liking the dirt napper...
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  18. 97707

    97707 Go Long Supporter

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    Another thing can be helpful is, shut off the petcock right away to prevent leaks or flooding. And if you're on a slope, the bike should be in gear to keep it from rolling. Even with the rear tire stopped, the front can roll.

    .
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  19. Junglejeff1

    Junglejeff1 Long timer

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    After 4 summers with the AT I am real careful on the big bitch.Put it down more times than I can count and always get it up but about pop a vien doing it in the mud.I am great physical condition but this is a big ass bike.I recommend one of the recovery systems if you ride alone.I backed down on the harder offroad stuff after being pinned under bike and wife was able to pick it up enough to get my leg out.Could have broke my leg and would have been fcked as we were 8 miles into woods.Getting bike up or unstuck is exhausting and makes for a shitty day.This year just do the easy logging roads and easy trails on the beast.It is a jacked up street bike and should be treated that way.
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  20. lifeofliberty

    lifeofliberty If you're bored, you're not living

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    This is now one of my favorite videos, because it reveals the ludicrous problems with 500+ bikes. I've dropped my DR650 on some wet clay on a very slight camber, very slick. Couldn't even spin the bike around to change the lift angle (peg just dug deep into the mud). Could NOT get any foot traction either. Had to get help. I do suspect I "could" have finally gotten it back on two wheels by myself, but I also risked injury to an already injured back. And it's WAY lighter then a AT.
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