Planning for a Birthday in Prudhoe Bay

Discussion in 'Americas' started by black 8, Jan 19, 2017.

  1. willys

    willys Long timer

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    Just a suggestion, if your chain doesn't have a master link in it, maybe install one and also carry a spare or chain chain to an O or X ring chain before you go.....simply because the stock chain can't be broken without a chain tool or grinder then you need that masterto put it back together...just a thought?
    Sorry didn't read back to see if you had done a sproket change already but going to 16 on the front is better also....
    I also recommend a UNI airfilter....but the stocj one is the next best for airflow, been bench flow tested in the past. IF that interests you. Plus a KLX needle kit from Eagle mike...
    #21
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  2. rideittoday

    rideittoday Adventurer

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    Kudos to you for your upcoming trip and all the preparation you're putting into the bike. I think you made a great choice in the KLR , In my opinion I think its a VERY capable bike for a trip like you're planning . As it turns out I just sold my KLR last week and reading your build thread has me missing it already!
    I have another bike so I'll still be riding .....But I can see another KLR in my garage down the road for sure.
    My 2 cents worth on the Stock seat........ You may get it comfy for you by shaving some foam...... However a word of caution and other KLR owners I think would agree ....the OEM seat foam will not last and might just flatten out on you during your trip...In fact I would almost bet on it.
    I went with a Sargent seat and could not have been happier....The Seat Concepts "kit" of new cover and foam is also an excellent product (I used the SC kit on another bike.)
    Best of Luck to you on your BIG TRIP ! Thanks for taking the time to share your Prep
    #22
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  3. black 8

    black 8 motographer

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    Luckily when I bought my KLR-650 last October, I held back major parts purchases knowing that Black Friday and end-of-year sales were just around the corner from the major online motorcycle stores. It was painful waiting to buy the wish lists I had set-up but in the end I saved money so I can buy more parts that I still needed. I read the ride reports where inmates had to replace their chain/sprockets while on the road so I bought spare parts. Thanks to Tusk from RM ATV/MC, I was able to buy the tools for chain installation at an affordable price.


    I've been down that road when I sold my 2008 KLR-650. Since then I have had a host of other bikes from Aprilia, Yamaha, Harley Davidson, and Ducati - now all gone. I missed my KLR so I bought the latest model, I 've heard through the rumor mill that single cylinders will be the thing of the past due to future emissions standards and newer/smaller displacement ADV type replacements. Anywho, I'll try shaving the foam from my stock seat first and give it a go. I just hate replacing perfectly good OEM parts unless I have worn them out first or broke it in the process.

    Please keep those suggestions coming - they act as a fail safe in case I missed something during my planning process.. cheers to all.
    #23
  4. black 8

    black 8 motographer

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    Traveling the 9,500 miles to Deadhorse and back requires more than just the OEM tool kit. The stock KLR-650 tool kit is not up to the task of changing tires or fixing flats. It requires specialized tools to get the job done i.e.; tire spoons, bead buddy, along with the OEM tools. Once I assembled the tools for my requirements, I needed a place to carry the heavier tools on the bike. The tool tube is a good solution by saving space in the panniers and moves weight from the rear of the bike to the lower front for weight distribution. I also MacGyvered a steel cable and lock for added security.

    Tool Tube.jpg
    #24
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  5. willys

    willys Long timer

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    I use a slightly larger tool tube similar, but, I also use an old leather sleeve from a leather coat without any lining in it as a sock to hold the tools in the tube. It allows getting them in and out a bit easier. BUT, I learned the hard way about these tubes, they attract condensation!!! After a few seasons of not needing to open it up I went in to just have a peek, most were solid rust! I restocked the kit and then soaked the leather sleeve in oil to keep the tools free frokm water and it allows the sleeve to slide in and out far better. Yes the tools may get a bit slimey, but at least they are useable! It's a good thing I didn't actually need them before i found them all rusted up!, Never a rust problem again, simply carry some rags with you to wipe them down if too oily for your hands.
    #25
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  6. willys

    willys Long timer

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    Are you keep those tires? Hmmm.....no comment on their wear and dirt capabilities, I run Kenda 761 for all but the nasty gravel or off road trips, then i switch to 270's...both are inexpensive tires and last a good amount of time. they also work well in both conditions. I run the 761's down to 18psi for trails and as long as I fully understand their abilities I'm goo, just pump them back up as soon as you hit tarmac or they will cut as all tires will. The 270's will also do double duty if you inflate them correctly....this sounds wrong but it works to get enough mileage out of them to ride across Canada fully loaded....32 front 24 rear!!! Feels masty to start with but it gives you a complete tire to road patch area instead of just the centre runing flat and then bald quickly! The 761's i run both at 32 and have good results. They are al i use unless in deep mud etc, then a 606 may be carried.
    #26
  7. black 8

    black 8 motographer

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    I keep the tools in a cordura tool bag so I don't lose any tools in case the tube gets punctured. Great idea about an oil soaked leather sleeve to keep the tools from rusting... I like it and may throw in an oil soaked rag to do the same!!

    As for tires, I plan to spoon on a set of TKC80 front and rear tire (or Mitas E-07 for extended mileage) right before I leave. A youtuber named eveRide likes the Kenda 270s for the price and grip it gives him on and off-road; definitely can't beat it for the price. I may give that a try when I return for local rides.
    #27
  8. willys

    willys Long timer

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    I don't know if the oil rag would work to keep the water from anything it wasn'tactually touching or covering.....maybe some of the those water packages you get when you buy goods that must be free from moisture? I like the oily sleeve as I also lubes the tools...lol.
    Oh your locking system, just to keep caps from wandering off? I drilled and tapped two holes and used a thumbscrew screw to hold the caps on, works great but my caps are simple plumbing threaded end caps in 3" ABS tubing....just a thought....I also have had the hose clamps break if they are stretchedt too tight over a sharp bar, so I do as you have done added way more than necessary to stop the tube from falling and jaming up rear tire..augh...lol
    Yes I see you have gone over the top of the sharp edge of your skid plate, add some rubber and it'll be better.
    #28
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  9. black 8

    black 8 motographer

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    Almost finished with the upgrades for the upcoming trip to Deadhorse which is just four months away. In reading the Alaska ride reports and watching youtube videos on Dalton Hwy travel, the KLR-650 will definitely earn some character along the way. A couple of key take aways for me were; (1) when approaching an on-coming truck headed the opposite direction either slow down or pull over to the side to minimize damage to your bike, (2) when being overtaken by a semi on the Dalton - pull over for the truck and let the truck pass.

    This is a photo of Danell Lynn's fairing after getting struck by a rock thrown from a semi on the Dalton Hwy in Sept 2015:

    Rock Damage.jpg

    I've had my own experience driving through the ALCAN with rock strikes cracking the windshield on my F-250 when I moved to Alaska in 2005 and again in 2007 when I moved back down to the lower 48. To try and mitigate a cracked headlight on the KLR, I researched a couple of solutions:

    Lamin-X heavy duty film

    Lamin X.jpg

    The CE Bailey rock guard

    CE Bailey .jpg

    IMO the Lamin-X sits against the headlight and a rock strike can still crack the plastic underneath the film. The Cee Bailey is made of plastic and costs about $50.00 and sits a few eights of an inch from the headlight. In the end I decided to buy the all metal Moose Racing headlight guard for $79.00 and used my Zillacash for a discount.

    Another upgrade was the installation of two Rigid Industries Dually spot auxiliary light during low-light travel (not that I'll use it much in Northern Canada or Alaska) but will come in handy in the lower 48. They also get a clear plastic cover to help protect the lens.

    IMG_0616.JPG
    #29
  10. willys

    willys Long timer

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    Personally I'd run with those spots all the time as lng as they are aimed correctly.....you can't have too much lighting facing the oncoming traffc...imho....that is aimed as so it doesn't blind them...lol Also the larger the triangle between your lights the better they see you...proven fact...so what i did was mount the spots onto the fromt forks where the reflectors mount...on the lower tubes....it works well and they also turn with your bars!
    #30
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  11. black 8

    black 8 motographer

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    The model that I mounted were the Rigid Industries Dually Spotlight 20221. I chose those specifically for the light pattern. I figured the KLR headlights will "flood" the road directly ahead while the "spot" pattern will light 400 meters ahead of me. They are LEDs so they are bright as heck.

    dually-beam-pattern.jpg
    #31
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  12. willys

    willys Long timer

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    I have one of the first Britania Composites full fairing with twin HIDs..they are so bright I have used the high beam maybe 1/2 dozen times! It shines so far forward any vehicle coming as far as you can see and i mean as far as you can see them, start flashing me like crazy! That is why I use simple cheap assed spots or floods to shine closer to the bike or as simple added lights to make that important triangle shape of light. It seems that someone has researched that drivers ignor a solid beam no matter how bright, unless sun like, but notice a triangle shape to make you look less like a bike. Seems right by me, so I'll play along...lol.
    I almost bought the really good LEDs for the forks and crash bars but cheaped out....one set died an early death but the other seems to be hanging in. So at $10 I'm very surprised! Free shipping too...but the wait'll kill you...lol. Slow boat from China...lol.
    #32
  13. black 8

    black 8 motographer

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    I try not to pay full price for anything; if I can get away with making offers, discount coupon or Black Friday sales - I'm all over it. I paid half the price for the Rigid Industries and have been lucky to save money for my upgrades and gear.....

    I usually scan eBay for deals, the other day I made an offer for brand new Klim Overland pants with tags. The seller was offering the pants for $199.00, for sh!ts and giggles I made them an offer for $150.00 and a minute later they took my offer. :wings
    #33
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  14. willys

    willys Long timer

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    When buying lights, there is a massive differance between the good quality items and the chaeap ass versions and you pay dearly for the good stuff....I'm too cheap to spend for the known good stuff....just saying....and like you, go for the best deal I can find.
    #34
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  15. black 8

    black 8 motographer

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    "Junk on the Bunk"

    This is the 95% solutions to the planned load-out of all the gear that I will be taking with me on my moto adventure to Deadhorse; which is four months away. I know I am packing out ahead of time, however I plan to validate the load-out in short outings locally and to get acquainted with the weight and handling. I have gone on cross-country treks to Florida a couple of times but nothing of this magnitude. On previous rides I packed minimal gear in a Wolfman dry bag and a backpack; staying in hotels for the night. This go around I plan to camp the entire time - come rain or shine. Most of the camping equipment I am bringing have been tested and I am thoroughly familiar with the gear. To save space, and mitigate hungry bears at my campsite, I plan to buy dehydrated Mountain House meals along the way and consume each day's meal before retiring for the night. Once in a while I'll make sure to taste the local cuisine and some fermented beverages. I have plotted the Wal-Marts along my route so I can re-supply on the go. Cooking equipment will be my trusted canteen cup, a Coleman micro stove, and an MRE spoon.

    The following load plan is based on my needs during the trip. I created this packing list for my sanity; (1) so I know where everything is located and I don't have to tear everything apart looking for something; ever do that sometimes? (2) this serves as a checklist to verify the load plan on the day prior, (3) serves as a record for future moto adventures. Each container has been weighed and placed in designated locations for weight distribution. I limited the weight inside each pannier to 33.7 lbs and under so potholes and frost heaves don't wreak havoc on the pannier mounting bolts and cause them to shear. For now this is the load-out plan and is still subject to change up to the date of departure.

    Updated Packing List: 22 April 2017

    Packing List.jpg
    #35
  16. willys

    willys Long timer

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    Just a suggestion, not knowing if you have read my opinoin on a cheap ass tarp to hang above your tent to keep it dry or not, just strongly suggest it...to each their own...
    #36
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  17. black 8

    black 8 motographer

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    Yup - got it in the dry bag with the tent. Thanks..
    #37
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  18. black 8

    black 8 motographer

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    Just sharing this link that I found during my own research for my trip through Canada and Alaska and ultimately to Deadhorse..

    The website: http://avcams.faa.gov directs you to the FAA's numerous cameras located throughout Canada and Alaska. You can use this link to see the weather in "real time" when you have a WiFi at a Tim Horton's, hotel, or campsite so you can gauge road condition ahead during your travels.....

    Weather Camera A.jpg

    By selection the area your are traveling to, you can see the FAA camera that is located at that specific place and see the weather in "real time". This is a screenshot of the Deadhorse camera with a local time of 11:38pm on 31 Jan 2017 as an example.

    Waether Camera.jpg
    #38
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  19. black 8

    black 8 motographer

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    Major score on eBay today for gear I'll be taking to Deadhorse with me.

    I have been looking for a more comfortable replacement for my Sidi Crossfire boots since my feet will practically be living in them for 30 days. The Klim Torque vest will work well as a mid layer while riding and around the campsite.


    Untitled.jpg
    #39
  20. black 8

    black 8 motographer

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    Calcium Chloride on the Dalton Hwy is going to suck; specially if it rains!

    I've read in many ride reports that: (1) if the Dalton Hwy is dry - you will be covered in calcium chloride dust, (2) if it rains - the calcium chloride mud gets into every nook and cranny of your bike, (3) it corrodes exposed metal parts, (4) you need to get it off as soon as possible or it will harden to a concrete like crud, and ohh it also make the mud gooey.

    This was a major concern of mine headed up to Deadhorse so I researched products to mitigate the effects of the calcium chloride on the KLR. Many inmates advocated for the use of a liquid spray as a release agent so the calcium chloride is easier to wash off (PAM for your bike) and it made sense. ACF 50 or Anti Corrosion Formula 50 has been recommended by some inmates and did my homework on this product. If it's good enough for military aircraft applications - it's good enough for the KLR. Here is a training demo for ACF 50 application on motorcycles that I was able to find on youtube:



    The other item is a cheap mudflap I found on eBay for $10.00 and will serve to prevent the mud from getting to the rear shock and spring. I prefer this style mudflap because I can bolt it to the subframe mudguard and it's long enough to cover the swing arm assembly as well.

    ACF 50.jpg
    #40