Please help brainstorm a cross country trip

Discussion in 'Americas' started by CarKid1989, Jul 1, 2019.

  1. Yinzer Moto

    Yinzer Moto aka: trailer Rails Supporter

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    I don’t have bad knees but a lot of bikes aggravate my knees. I prefer a more dual sport riding position where my knees are not as bent. I also like a bike that I can stand on while riding, to stretch the back and knees out. When my wife and I did the 2 up thing, sometimes I would stand and stretch, sometimes she would stand on the back, sometimes we both would stand.
    #41
  2. kantuckid

    kantuckid Long timer

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    Natural Bridge SP/Red River Gorge Geological Area. "My people" came from the Ozarks MO/N AR area and Sedalia many years back, so I have misery DNA in me.
    Op: go for it on a bike if both butts and backs are willing. If not, trips are not defined by motorcycles IMO, but how they pleased your needs overall. E.G. is our next trip together will involve our RV and perhaps a float trip with our inflatable in the Rocky mtns..
    Not anything like the Vespa GTS trip I leave for in an hour or so to S IN where I'm solo and enjoying the twisties & the change of temps to cooler.
    IBA two up is neither mine nor my wifes pleasure. I remain a non-IBA rider & I'll leave that alone, other than to say my trips are not defined/about the miles as a measure of what happened.
    #42
  3. thetourist

    thetourist Just passing thru

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  4. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

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    Knee and back pain could turn out to be something that makes the trip miserable. This might be solved by choosing a bike that lets you stretch your legs, and has a top box that doubles as a passenger backrest. A V-Strom 1000 maybe? Maybe even the Wee-Strom. I wouldn't be surprised if one pops up with an aftermarket seat. You could also buy an ATV seat pad from Walmart. You should figure this out before buying, obviously.

    How old are you two, if you don't mind me asking? When my wife and I were in our 20s-30s, we could tough out stuff like this. As we break into our 50s, the CRV begins to sound pretty good. :lol3

    Speaking of the choice between motorcycle and SUV... On the motorcycle, you could bring nothing more than sleeping pads, sleeping bags (sub freezing rated), and a small tent (say 5x7). Don't bring any cooking gear...well, maybe a weenie stick and a soft sided cooler for temporary food transport. Eat at grocery stores or restaurants along the way. The tent space thread is a great resource, and sometimes has rooms rather than a place to pitch a tent.

    If you take the SUV, there are things you can do to make it more fun. My wife and I made a big loop in our 4x4 Chevy from our home in central California, through Yellowstone, to Mount Rushmore, down through Colorado and Utah. That was 3 weeks, mind you. We took pretty minimal camping gear, and our mountain bikes. We got to ride them in places like Moab, Manitou Springs, Yellowstone, etc. The other thing you could do is rent a motorcycle in key places you'd like to ride. Moab, the California coast, Pismo Dunes (or maybe Glamis if Pismo is closed?), Las Vegas, whatever. We have rented everything from Vespa scooters, to a Ducati Multistrada 1260 for one day intervals. It's always a blast.

    Whichever you take, be sure to make time to see stuff when it is open. Don't travel all of the daylight hours, and find yourself always looking at "closed" signs when you stop. We like to get an early start on the road, and stop no later than 3pm. That can be 9 hours of travel if you want it to be, and still have the afternoon to check stuff out. Of course some days you'll want to get into a National Park early and spend most of the day there (consider a National Parks Pass). The passenger can scout lodging about 1/2 to 1 day ahead, so reservations don't dictate your route.
    #44
  5. CarKid1989

    CarKid1989 Been here awhile

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    Wife is 28, I am 29 (almost 30 hence the trip)

    You mentioned the exact thing we were thinking. Bring just enough gear to sleep outside and eat at grocery stores/ dennys/ small restaurants along the way. Cuts down a lot of gear.
    #45
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  6. CarKid1989

    CarKid1989 Been here awhile

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    Also, this evening we took a friends 2005 Goldwing for a spin.

    Jacie loved it. Duh. I mostly could have figured as much but we needed to be sure.

    I loved the bike. The second you release the clutch the weight disappears and the torque pulls you away. It was a blast honestly and to know my wife was enjoying herself and not just putting up with something made things great. I enjoyed myself and could see us on one.

    I read on here a ton about V-Strom 650 (or 1000, same frame) and they being good for two up riding similar to what we are planning. So I wanna call another buddy to check it out. They are certainly cheaper. We are not looking to tear up every corner and race around so should work.

    Glad things are starting to come together
    #46
  7. kantuckid

    kantuckid Long timer

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    Wee-strom is the better plan IMO, of course. If you are gonna do this as it should be done on a bike, then now's the time, as life gets in the way of these type of things. In my case it was education, military, jobs with long hours, more education, then raising a family which MC's don't mix well with as for long tours.
    Even now in retirement I have to fit my PTW play around remaining married, family/grandkids and trips my wife & I do together.
    The 650 is my choice overall but they are a bit tall for my legs which is why my most recent late model MC was a BMW with a lower seat the the wee-strom. Your ergos enter into making MC choices as most are tall, not low seats other than a few and of course, the cruisers.
    Your not cooking plan is quite doable and greatly simplifies the trip, w/o making camping a bunch of stuff to tote. Always think ahead on food as many of the best CG's are not close to easy food like a run back to eat from the CG. My two day trip this week the food was 12-14 mile run from the IN SP to town.
    #47
  8. White mt guy

    White mt guy Long timer

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    Just my thoughts. A cross country is not only doable with two people, it's a ton of fun and a lifetime experience.
    Just the facts. First you will be in the US so a change of heart mid trip is no problem. She can catch a plane home, both of you can catch a plane home and ship the bike, you can rent a van and haul the bike home and enjoy the trip another way, etc etc.
    Bike gear is easier then one thinks. The bike needs nothing more then the tool kit it comes with for general maintenance, really. Add a air pump and flat repair kit and call AAA and for $30.00 get a motorcycle policy.
    Gear for you. If your going on a FJ or Connie then one side bag each for clothes. Reserve a bit more space for her , woman do need a bit more then men (general fact) extra underwear, extra warm clothes( a pillion tends to get a bit colder on the back) and toiletries. The top box or large dry bag should be used for camping gear. Two 32deg bags and a fleece blanket to go over both works perfectly add a small two person tent and two inflatable sleeping pads and a extra small tarp. If you have space I recommend a couple of lightweight camp chairs, if not almost every campground has a picnic table to sit at.
    Food can be bought on the road cheap, remember your in the US, it's not difficult to find a grocery store.
    Campgrounds are everywhere, some nice , some not nice, but that's the experience. And yes, you will get one. My last trip was during fourth of July and I still had no issues finding a place to camp.
    Ride comfort is relatively easy. Wear a pair of cotton underwear under a pair of Motoskivees and by a sheepskin pelt online($30.00 to $100.00) and drape it over both seats, it will be all day comfort and cooling/warming, depending on weather.
    Bottom line is riding in the US is as simple as riding gets. If your road touring you are never far enough away from anything you need or want. Yes it's TRUE you may wait for a few hours if you breakdown, but seriously is that a real issue in the grand scheme of a large ride?
    Imo, go and enjoy the experience with a significant other that's willing to go with you. "Lifelong memories"
    #48
  9. kantuckid

    kantuckid Long timer

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    The above makes it sound like candyland here in the US? :lol2 If certain things were only that handy for us all. Walmart is a 50 miles RT for us and major medical care is further. Cell phones can be sporadic, so help is not always so easy peasy depending on where one gets stopped. Modern machines, tires, etc., are so much more dependable that's a given now days. But when things go south, good luck.
    I remembering a car trip with my wife in 1972 across a narrow area of N ID after leaving Glacier NP. It was like 208 miles between gas stations as I recall. We were tent camping our way to various places like Tetons where it rained all 3 days we'd set aside for that stop. It was not that close to all those USA handy places mentioned above and too wet for a fire (to eat hot food) and too wet to really get out and about-that said by outdoor living people too! Touring on a bike at the end of a tiring day is NOT! when I get real excited about getting back on to find food and unless a trip is plotted all in advance, we don't always know when is the optimum time to either buy deli food or wieners to roast, so to speak.
    Good luck on all that everything comes easy cross country trip huh? :rofl
    But in the end i do agree it will be a memorable trip and great fun.
    Cotton underwear (or shirts!) is not the wicking stuff that makes for modern comfort when riding. Most of my "wardrobe" is cotton T-shirts, cotton bibs and jeans, wally boxers, but when riding any distance out comes the wicking shirts, undies and glove liners, all year long.
    Some like me like sheepskin but airhawk is what I'd consider if i did it again.
    #49
  10. White mt guy

    White mt guy Long timer

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    Oh god, man did you just compare travel in 1972 to today? I don't know when your last road trip was , but it's just a tad bit different now. Unless your driving a sportster or similar that has a 1.5 gal tank , which the op is not, then finding fuel is damn near simple. Today a person can easily plan in the AM or the night before or at any place with wifi on their smart phone ,routes, food, gas, or anything they need or want for the day..No, not buying what your selling. Road travel is easy and if you haven't done it in while then scaring people is not cool.
    As for my comment on comfort. If you put dry wicking underwear under motoskivees you will without a doubt get chafing. If you wear motoskivees without a layer between you and your pants you will find the motoskivees riding up your ass, not comfortable. The cotton acts as a soft layer that stops chafing and flossing and the dry wicking motoskivees will still pull moisture , win win.
    I live in New England and Wal Mart is still a 35 mile round trip and I'm very happy about that, but it doesn't mean that there is an abyss between Wal-Mart and me. There are plenty of other places to get what I need. As far as hospitals go , yes wouldn't it be nice if there was one on every corner, but that's what EMS services are for. We all hope to never need them, but it is always a shit show if we do , no matter the distance. All this of course is about road touring and not being the back country , which is a different world with different planning.
    #50
  11. YourPal

    YourPal Been here awhile

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    V-Strom 1000 or 650. Start with that and pack as if you are going backpacking. Eat out and just pack snacks and drinks for the campground. I have seen the 650 loaded with enough stuff and 2up to survive for a month.
    Check out the equipment section for ideas on gear. Most stuff can be had for cheap on Amazon and Walmart.
    #51
  12. kantuckid

    kantuckid Long timer

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    I can assure you that I've been on the road much since then, cars, trucks, buses, planes and trains and I forgot MC's for many years. If there's one thing I've passed on to my adult sons, it's that the world is their doorstep and they too have been all over it as have I.
    I am fully in the modern world, thank you. I really doubt that they've got many Flying J's in the area of ID I mentioned.
    When you come away from Bella Coola, B.C. th gas sign says 400 plus K's to gasoline, but I do admit to that trip having been in 2002 when I was first retired.
    I'm currently planning a self guided trip/tour of the Balkans and we are also going to the Mtn's in WY for a fall RV trip. Yeh, we get around some, as much as family and money allows. Fished in N ON in June.
    Wicking lessons? come on. We wore cotton under our shoulder pads back when... Chafing, I have large thighs and was a caddie all of my young life, walking miles & miles carrying double bags from age 12 into college, boy do I ever know chafing! I'd get home at night and tend to my near bloody groin and crotch, TMI, I know.:-)
    My touring skivee's are designed to be your only undies, or so I've been thinking.:lol2
    Nor am I out to "scare" anyone? :rofl
    Yes, we live away from commercialization on purpose. Per National Geographic's map of the USA showing places away from a road, there are damned few spots far from a road in the USA. Most of us are near something.
    No, I'm not angry, just having some fun here.:D
    #52
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  13. White mt guy

    White mt guy Long timer

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    :photog I have to admit, a bit jealous. I've been aching to explore the Balkens since a friend told me about his trip.
    #53
  14. kantuckid

    kantuckid Long timer

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    Lets go!
    I'd welcome a ride partner, a paved not enduro type trip but gravel, etc. is OK too.
    I've found the rentals but undecided as to which city to use for air tics as we speak.
    #54
  15. DSchmidt7of7

    DSchmidt7of7 Been here awhile

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    I'm new to the thread, but have enjoyed the banter.

    One thought I had was to buy a smaller bike that you can ride two up and trailer it behind the CRV. You already own the car and it does fairly good on gas and can easily pull a small trailer. I know, I have one.

    The car/trailer allows you blast through nearby "flyover" states that you can visit later and do it in comfort. You can even take turns driving if you like. Once you get someplace interesting, yank the bike off the trailer and go explore cities, mountains, deserts, etc. for a day or two. You can car camp some and stay in hotels when you need to. Don't forget to check out the tent space thread here as well. It's a great resource for places to stay cheap, and access to folks who have a lot of local knowledge.

    No need for huge (and expensive) riding/camping gear and bags, just carry enough stuff to spend a night in a air-BnB and then head back to the CRV for the next leg. If you get tired of the bike, the trip will still be fun. When you're finished you'll have a good mid-range bike that can be used once you get home. Buying, using and then selling the trailer and/or bike would not be all that difficult and would save you tons of money.

    Here's my rig. The CRV handles the trailer quite well and the (ahem) KLR is an excellent low cost - "do anything" kinda bike.

    [​IMG]

    By far the most important advice given by others is to just "GO FOR IT". Don't overthink this. You're going to have a great time.

    Oh yeah, please keep us posted on your trip. Many of us wish we could do what you're doing.

    Attached Files:

    #55
  16. tlub

    tlub Long timer Supporter

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    At that age I was 2-up camping on the R75/5. Tail box for the kitchen and food, and it was small (maybe 15L). Tank for the tent (small, pup tent type) and one sleeping bag. The other sleeping bag on the tail box. (light weight). One saddle bag each for all our stuff, and not full, either. They were (still are) Wixoms, which are maybe 20-25L. I was 5'11" and 170lbs, she was 5'6" and maybe 115-120. Rain suits were Dry Rider, vinyl. Leather jackets and jeans. These days, I'd wear a 'Stich full time and not have to carry the rainsuit. Rise at dawn, coffee and either oatmeal or rice, with a stop at a diner around 10AM for another breakfast. Then buy food for the day around lunch. Made sandwiches a lot. We were not rich. Stopped at motels every few days if we couldn't find a campground with showers.
    #56
  17. oneway

    oneway Tehachapi CA

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    For Christ’s sakes. I just got off a 5000 mile ride with another friend. Here was our plan:
    1. Meet at evil Knievel’s grave site Aug 1st at high noon and do a shot of tequila.( we left one for Evel but later found out from a local he would have preferred wild turkey)
    2. Ride
    Mattratt came from Minnesota and I came from California. We both did our own thing getting to the departure point.
    We rode together for about 2 weeks then we did our own thing back to our homes.
    Would you just get on a fucking bike and ride?
    #57
  18. ronskibeat

    ronskibeat Adventurer

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    dude, after riding 2 goldwings, 2 ST1300's, a Connie, and a Super Tenere-- for the trip you are planning nothing will work better than the Goldwing. Put a CT on the back, add TPMS and ride the trip of your life. JMHO.....
    #58
  19. boatpuller

    boatpuller Long timer

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    BTW, CT= Car Tire, and TPMS= Tire Preasure Monitoring System. Both are good ideas for a highway cruiser.
    #59