Plywood for building cabinets

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by MotorcycleWriter, Sep 16, 2019.

  1. theDoktor

    theDoktor Husky Racer

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    This, plus a pair of adjustable outfeed roller stands have served me well over many years. Don't recall where I got the stands- either a local Woodcraft or Rockler, but they've held up well and were a worthwhile investment IMHO.
    #41
  2. theDoktor

    theDoktor Husky Racer

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    Agreed. If you keep the cabinet width short and attach a solidly-made face frame with both pocket screws and glue, MDF make OK cheap, paint grade shop cabinets. Almost anything else is better structurally. Melamine is worse than MDF for cabinet bodies and shelves. It is just particleboard covered on both faces with a VERY thin plastic film. Glue won't stick to the melamine, so you have to remove it at joint meeting surfaces. VG20 Vertical Grade cabinet liner plastic laminate is much thicker and performs better. Forget about screw-holding ability in both of these substrates except for straight thru into a support structure- joints need to be glued, with dados or rabets.
    #42
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  3. jar944

    jar944 Long timer

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    Have you considered a track saw and Paulk style bench?
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  4. MotorcycleWriter

    MotorcycleWriter Vis ad locum

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    I'd not heard of a Paulk bench. Very interesting! I had designed and built something similar a few years ago and was using it to cut plywood. It certainly wasn't thought out to this level of detail but it's an excellent example of how anyone working to the same constraints is going to come up with similar solutions. I had a few guys over at my house doing some work and they raved about the table. It was far more crude and really only for cutting plywood. I built it because I was tired of fumbling around with cutting plywood sheets on the ground. But it was SO heavy.

    I see Mr. Paulk was using sawhorses and plywood, like so many of us have, and then went to a door, as I mentioned above. I like a lot of things about this table and will probably find a kit that I can just assemble. I'd rather just put together something that has already been precision cut and is using the right kind of plywood instead of doing it all from scratch. I don't really want my workbench to be my project. I have too many projects for that!

    I like the track saw idea as well but I actually already have the exact same saw he is using in THIS VIDEO so I'll give that a try. I'd still have to do something with infeed but that's a simpler problem since, by definition, you only have a single piece going in, not two! The one downside I see to this design just by observation is that it's going to catch and trap sawdust that's going to be hard to get out.

    Thanks for showing me this. I was totally unaware of it's existence but may very well solve my problem. I could store it against my ceiling and even use some clamps to make sure it stays straight when it is up there.
    #44