Project: Warthog

Discussion in 'Hacks' started by CCjon, Sep 6, 2019.

  1. brstar

    brstar Long timer

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    On your ear, or is it a silk purse?
  2. Ridn3

    Ridn3 Lopsidd

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    Have you used a check valve in a gravity system before? I am setting up an aux tank on my K12LT now and wasn't sure that gravity feed would open a check valve. Since you are using a bulkhead fitting, is a check valve necessary? I am tapping into the fuel return line, so a check valve may be needed.
  3. CCjon

    CCjon Gypsy Rider Supporter

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    R3, yes, have used a check valve on a gravity feed system. Never any issues with the flow. If the main tank is even slightly pressurized, it will not push fuel into an empty fuel cell if you have a check valve. Without a check valve, if both tanks are empty, when filling the main tank, fuel will flow, abet slowly into the fuel cell. You will think the main tank is full at the pump, but fuel is still flowing back to the aux tank unless you have a check valve.

    If you tie into a return line, without a check valve, pressure will force fuel into an empty fuel cell instead of back into the main tank. A check valve will allow fuel to be pulled from the aux fuel cell into the main tank without worry of fuel flowing the other way.
  4. Ridn3

    Ridn3 Lopsidd

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    Interesting. On my R1150RT U had a gravity feed system without a check valve. It went to a bulkhead fitting similar to what you have without any problems. On the K1200LT there does not seem to be a good place for one, hence the return line. I am trying a Y fitting to the return line in the hopes that the flow will invite the aux fuel along to the main tank. I'm going to try without the check valve first and ad one if necessary. It's great to know that I can do that.
    CCjon likes this.
  5. PowderMonkey

    PowderMonkey Been here awhile

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    JB weld? Really? I’d be more wary of that than any rubber o-ringed bulkhead fitting. Just my two cents, because that would worry the .... out of me in the middle of nowhere.
  6. CCjon

    CCjon Gypsy Rider Supporter

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    ^^^^
    Interesting take on the Weld. Used the Weld for an identical aux fuel fitting on my Vstrom1000 w/ side camper. then rode from Texas to eastern Canada's Trans-Labrador Trail, then the following year up to Alaska and back. After thousands of miles on some rough roads over several years, nary a drop leaked from that fitting.

    On the other hand I have had rubber gaskets on fuel tanks stretch and deform due to the ethanol content, allowing leaks and drips to escape.

    I don't work for JB, don't sell JB, don't own any stock in the company. Is the Weld recommended for gasket use? Probably not. I just know after thousand of rough miles that fitting did not leak.

    We all make choices and place our lives at risk on those choices, be it tires, shocks or fittings. I sleep better with something experience has shown me works than with something I have seen fail.

    Now should you bet your life on my experiences? NO! Make your own choices, just enjoy the ride.
  7. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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    Quick JB Weld anecdote. I was on a section of the Washington Backcountry Discovery Route south of Ellensburg and came on a guy from Back East on a brand new R1200GS that he'd dumped on it's side and smashed a big hole in his magnesium valve cover (cylinder head cover). He wanted me to go into town (over an hour by dirt) and send him a tow truck (no cell phone coverage out there.) Pshaw! says I. Pulled the cover, found the piece that had been punched out, degreased as best I could using gasoline and a micro towel, then patched it together with some JB Weld -- the 5-minute kind. Did two batches and it looked OK enough. Waited an hour to let it cure a bit, then followed him into town. I'll bet that guy has carried JB Weld in his tool kit ever since.
  8. PowderMonkey

    PowderMonkey Been here awhile

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    No worries. Wasn’t trying to be an armchair engineer. I just went through the design and plumbing of my aux fuel tank on my GS. IMG_0198.jpg
    I’m running a low volume pump through the return line, on a timed circuit. Takes roughly 13 min. to transfer 3 gal. of fuel.
    pops, triumphsidehack, CCjon and 3 others like this.
  9. CCjon

    CCjon Gypsy Rider Supporter

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    Finished the aux fuel cell plumbing and the bike side wiring several days ago. Some days can only squeeze an hour or two free to get on to this project.

    Make a major jump forward today. Brought the tub back from the storage unit, set it in place for mounting and wiring. With the stay at home and social distancing rules we are having in the Houston area, a two man job has to be done by one person with the help of jacks. lifts, ropes and pulleys... a few cuss words thrown in seems to get things done too. Finding the right thickness spacer to level the tub was a pain...

    IMG_E1976.jpg


    Between a hand mirror for seeing around corners and underneath, plus a telescoping little magnet pick ups for dropped nuts and washers, one can accomplish solo more than one thinks. Of course when I cuss myself out, it ain't so bad, but when someone else cusses me, thems fightin' words.

    IMG_E1978.jpg

    So that's where that chunk of 2x4 disappeared to.....
  10. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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    Your mention of the hand mirror reminds me that, as I get older and less able to do things in the garage (mobility issues), I've discovered the camera on my cell phone can be a useful tool. Sometimes for pictures, but mostly to simply point the lens at the thing I can't see and have it come up in full detail on the phone's display.
  11. CCjon

    CCjon Gypsy Rider Supporter

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    Started carrying a small dollar store mirror on the rigs as most engines have the oil sight glass down low on the tub side. Got so the only way I could check the oil level at a gas stop was with a mirror. Then found more and more uses for it around the Cave. Combing where hair used to be is not one of them...:chace

    The smart phone camera is a good idea, though in the Man Cave it's occupied providing quality music through a bigger speaker while wrenches are turning.

    Getting down to look and check on things isn't so bad... even falling is easy. The sudden stop at the end can hurt. It's the getting back up that's a real challenge if there is nothing to grab hold of.

    When strangers stop to offer help getting you back up... you know age has done crept up on you. :zilla:ksteve:gerg never saw it coming...
  12. FLYING EYEBALL

    FLYING EYEBALL out of step

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  13. CCjon

    CCjon Gypsy Rider Supporter

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    ^^^^^ If I'd had one of those in Alaska, might have caught the crack before it snapped the frame. That would great for checking for loose nuts and bolts on the sidecar frame and subframe before, during and after a month long trip.

    When riding the primitive roads, thing loosen quickly.
  14. CCjon

    CCjon Gypsy Rider Supporter

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    Snuck out of town to stretch the Warthog's legs for the first time. Jumped out to Bellville for a quick stop at SFA statue, that's Stephen F. Austin for those northerners... Bellville is the county seat for Austin County, thus the statue. SFA is considered the father of Texas. Got his blessings then moved on...

    Austin.jpg

    Shortly after found a county road... not too dusty with the recent rains. Grass is green and high. Oak trees are putting out new growth.

    High Grass.jpg

    So how does it handle? It's a hand full. Yes, has a low speed wobble, settles down at 40 and above until you hit 68-70, then it gets lightheaded in front. Smooth and steady in fourth gear, 2500 rpm, 55-60 mph. Up shift to 5th gear, rpm's drop to 2000, feel a little lugging. Down shift to fourth and smooth once again.

    The faster you go (50-70 mph), the more you have to push on the right handlebar and pull on the left. We're pushing a lot of air with that nose. Yet overall, meets my expectations. Still needs a few tweaks and twists before any long road trip.

    Good news was an average 25 mpg on this 130 mile loop. Better than expected.

    Only hiccup was on the fourth stop, the bike would not start. After multiple tries, finally fired up. Back home, the bike would start perfect, then not crank at all. Visited the R3 forum for input. Seems Triumph has not totally shed their electrical glitch pedigree since the days of the Prince of Darkness, Lucas switches and wiring.

    Spent the next day and a half chasing my tail trying to locate the electrical fault. Removed and cleaned clutch safety switch, side stand safety switch, relays, etc, etc. opened parts, cleaned, reinstalled, even bypassed the clutch and side stand safety switches. :fpalm

    In the end, my mistake for not checking the basic, the most obvious first.... the negative connection on the battery had vibrated loose on its maiden ride. Tightened it and the bike fires up every time. :stupid

    The project continues.
  15. mrsdnf

    mrsdnf Been here awhile

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  16. propforward

    propforward PIE!romaniac

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    That rig is absolutely astounding and amazing and wonderful. Lots of other good adjectives too. Also, so is your shop.

    :clap :thumb :bow
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  17. arbalest

    arbalest Been here awhile

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  18. draperg1

    draperg1 PapaBear

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    Mar 31, 2013
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    Martinsville, VA
    Saw a picture of a K12LT rig (can't remember where) that appeared to have a oil check dipstick mounted between chair and bike. I would pay good money for one, anyone familiar with this?
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  19. bk brkr baker

    bk brkr baker Long timer

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    Looks imposing , but , how could it not ?
    Really good news on the mileage since you're pushing as much air as a half-ton PU. Your rig is starring on face book on the Sidecar Heaven feed. It looks to be ready , willing and able.
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  20. CCjon

    CCjon Gypsy Rider Supporter

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    Was asked for a photo of the camper opened...
    The door has a small pop up table large enough for my laptop... or morning coffee.

    IMG_2013.jpg


    The camper makes the big Rocket 3 looks small...

    IMG_E2132.jpg

    Am expecting more bits and pieces in soon. A taller windshield is on order from Clearview. Two 10L NATO fuel cans are on their way here.

    Texas Sidecars did a final adjusting on the rig, now no light feeling on the front when running over 65, less effort in steering and almost no low speed wobble. Kent and Jon at TSC do good work. They know their stuff.

    IMG_2118.jpg

    Trains, planes and eighteen wheelers overhead... doubt if anyone could sleep here.