Proper technique in the twisties?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by -Q-, Mar 4, 2003.

  1. Curmudgeon

    Curmudgeon Enjoying the ride

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    Oops! PUI... IIllyyaa, I mistakenly thought you posted:

    '"God gave you brakes for a reason. Use them instead of your engine for slowing before a turn. Using your engine is lazy.'"

    when I referenced CoolCarbon's post, and that is what I refered to as "harshing my buz".

    Never Mind

    Patrick
    #41
  2. MartiniUp

    MartiniUp Long timer

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    slow in,,,fast out is my preferred method. Just like in the dirt.
    #42
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  3. klebs01

    klebs01 Been here awhile

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    WOW! Replying to an 18 year old thread might be a record. :imaposer
    #43
  4. Daboo

    Daboo Been here awhile

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    Don't let that stop you. :D

    If the OP had a kid when he started this thread, the kid can now vote in some states.
    #44
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  5. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Smoove, Smoove like velvet.

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    There are a couple of approaches for steep/tight downhills.

    1) trail brake, instead of doing the brake, push, throttle thing, you stay on the brakes decreasing brake pressure as lean increases and push the apex as far back to the end of the corner as possible, ideally being most of the way through the corner when you come off the brake and back into the throttle

    2) If you must brake, push, throttle, drag the rear brake to keep the bike from totally taking off (one I use all of the time, and GSs are tractors compared to mine)

    In switch backs the idea is to "chop the apex" instead of doing a bell (outside/entry, inside/apex, outside/exit) line it up close to the inside on exit, so you are effectively going outside/entry, inside/apex > stay inside on the exit, which sets you up for the way into the next corner. Rinse and repeat until you run out of corners, which the outside inside outside becomes correct again.
    #45
  6. pilotspike

    pilotspike Been here awhile

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    Just remember, if you go a bit slower today you might be able to go a bit faster tomorrow.

    If you go a bit faster today, you might not be able to go a bit slower tomorrow.

    J
    #46
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  7. messes

    messes Adventurer

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    It's interesting how things have changed since this thread started. iillyyaa's answer is still an excellent answer, but technology is taking over for some of them.

    ABS and cornering ABS will probably rescue those who run in to hot, or start applying brakes mid corner.

    Slipper clutches will reduce the effect of engine breaking and also preventing wheels locking from bad downshifts. The reduced engine breaking means front brakes are the best way to slow for a corner. (Which has been the case since the 1990's)

    For example:
    It's never a good idea to only use one brake and I don't really understand why the front break couldn't be applied smoothly to achieve the required reduction in speed.

    To give yourself time and prevent panic, I believe it's best to learn how to read the visual point and slow to your entry speed while still travelling upright. Yes you can trail brake further into the turn but you leave yourself less room for errors of judgement or changing conditions.
    #47
  8. KingOfFleece

    KingOfFleece SplitWeight(tm) waterproof seat covers Supporter

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  9. 300man

    300man Been here awhile

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    I had no idea this thread was so old. I was going to say hi to Ilea...I used to see him at the NETRA races years ago. But this thread even pre dates that!

    Hey Ilia the instructor passes you in that corner for several reasons, one is because he is in the race line and you are not!
    #49
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  10. DesertPilot

    DesertPilot Long timer

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    It may be an old thread, but it's a good one.

    Best advice I ever received was, "Smile inside your helmet". Yes, it sounds like one of those dorky feel-good things you'd print on a t-shirt, but it helps keep things together, and if you find that you stopped smiling, that's often a clue what part of the corner things are going wrong that day.

    Second best advice, which I'm pretty sure came from some thread on this forum, was, "Don't worry about the line through the turn you're in, always be looking ahead to the next turn." That's another one of those things that may not give any specific advice about technique, but helps put everything in perpective and keep things together.

    And yes... trail braking on the downhill sweepers, then rolling on the throttle just right. If that doesn't make you smile inside your helmet, I don't know what will :D
    #50
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  11. achtung3

    achtung3 Long timer

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    Staying in your lane and not falling off of your bike.
    #51