Pushing the Boundaries - Solo Adventure Riding

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by windblown101, Nov 15, 2020.

  1. Rollin'

    Rollin' does it come in black? Supporter

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    I like to start early and ride late.
    One concern is if something happens there may be no one too help you. When you start at 4:00 am in remote areas you may not see another vehicle for several hours.

    [​IMG]
    #41
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  2. windmill

    windmill Long timer

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    True, but decisions are deliberate, luck is passive. One can actively improve and grow their decision making process. Luck is always just luck, and one step from running out.

    One can't learn from luck until it runs out.
    #42
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  3. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Long timer

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    LOL, luck won't get you far on a motorcycle. Maybe road/gravel riding, but trail riding takes skills. Especially so if you're on a heavy ADV bike.
    #43
  4. Wanderir

    Wanderir Adventurer

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    The vast majority of my touring/trips have been solo rides. In '95 I want on the BMW Paris to Panama Rally, on a K111RS. 120 folks rode from New Mexico to the end of the Pan Am at the Darien Gap. In 2013, I bought a Yamaha Dual Sport 125 in Hanoi and did a 4k solo trip. No one had any idea where I was for most of my trips. I had days in Vietnam where I was off-road all day and maybe saw one other person. But cell service blankets the country, I had good insurance including repatriation and I hired a fixer to take care of me is something went sideways. I never needed him, but totally worth doing.

    I do lots of research before a long trip and the level of risk I'll accept is higher than most. I'm 56 and still getting out there and having fun, taking chances, but not being an idiot. I have to admit that there were a couple of times in Vietnam where I should have been riding with someone else. I had a couple of small slides, one about 10 meters up north in the rain and my gear kept me safe.

    I just bought an R1200GS Rallye and took a BMW Off-Road course, I learned a few things and increased my confidence. I live in Mexico City and there are many clubs, I've been riding with an off-road camping club. Nice guys.

    I'm headed o Sierra Gorda for 5 days tomorrow. Can't wait! It will be mostly solo riding, so I won't do any serious off-roading. I just put Pirelli Rally STR's on. I can't wait to break them in and see how they perform.

    I used to do a lot of endurance riding, 1000 mile days. There are 100 little hacks to stay focused and not get fatigued. There are folks here doing Iron Butt and I'll likely do that in the spring after I get my endurance skills back. They are doing 1000 and 1500 mile days, I've not done the latter yet, so I have a new goal.
    #44
  5. Dayypete

    Dayypete Adventurer

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    I agree 100%. I learned that lesson completely driving trucks and apply it to motorcycles now, 100%. I can always come back with the proper bike for the job if I must but to play really dangerous games for keeps is no longer a thrill to me. Too much to lose.
    #45
  6. snglfin

    snglfin this statement is untrue

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    one thing that has stuck with me from my wilderness first responder training is that we don’t think well when we’re physically depleted, and when confronting a challenge or trying to find the route, to take a minute to sit down and eat something. it seems counterintuitive (“who can eat at a time like this?”) but one can regain their wits by raising blood sugar levels.

    we reviewed some forensic accounts of mountaineering incidents that required rescue or body recovery, and in some there’s a snowball effect of one poor decision leading into the next - quite probably due to not eating in the midst of a crisis.

    anyone who has dealt with a kid or a spouse who’s “hangry” (hungry/angry) knows how little it takes to change the perspective of someone in that state... there’s truth in advertising in those snickers commercials.

    i’m enjoying reading all the contributions to this thread, some great info being shared here. ride safe, be well.

    johnnyg
    #46
  7. Sal Pairadice

    Sal Pairadice Captain Obvious Supporter

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    This is so true. Stay on the trail. Bushwacking almost always turns into a clustf--k of uncertainty.
    #47
  8. bomose

    bomose Long timer Supporter

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    Right. And there's no chance of meeting someone for help. At least on the road or trail someone will eventually find your body.
    #48
  9. dirtmarine

    dirtmarine Been here awhile

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    Totally agree with this. One "tool" for these cases is to carry gels or other type of quick glucose fix often used by endurance athletes. These are compact, some can be mixed with hydration, etc. In the midst of an outdoor crisis we tend not to think of nutrition or specifically a lack of glucose to the brain at key times. Combine this with tactical breathing, similar to what some responders are taught to stay in control amid an operation or crisis. I have an app on my phone for tactical breathing. Good at any time. I carry gels in my glove box, car and bike for emergencies or a boost at the 5 hr. mark. Regular nutrition is best but we don't always keep up on that until it too late. Gels or similar products can be had at Hammer or GU nutrition among others.
    #49
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  10. windblown101

    windblown101 Long timer Supporter

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    I keep a few of these stashed in a pocket of my hydration pack. They taste like ass and they are a weak substitute for not getting mentally and physically spent. I consider them a last resort, lol.

    However if you need to push on they do help a bit.

    20201211_110804.jpg
    #50
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  11. ZoomerP

    ZoomerP . Supporter

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    Before leaving after a stop, take a hard look around for what you left behind. That last check can save a lot of trouble when you realize you left something important behind while rummaging through a bag.

    Take in the view behind you, especially at a trail junction or landmark. That's more a backpacking thing, but it can still be done on a bike. Being able to recognize those points can aid in navigation when you need to turn around.
    #51
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  12. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Long timer

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    And also don't forget to make sure all your pockets are zipped back up. Do a double check on your helmet as well.
    #52
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  13. davenowherejones

    davenowherejones short old guy

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    I have ridden hundreds (thousands?) of kilometers with my pants fly open.
    #53
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  14. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Long timer

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    A great strategy for increased ventilation on a hot day :D
    #54
  15. davenowherejones

    davenowherejones short old guy

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    Also look for bear shit before you pee in the bush.

    I was doing up my pants and noticed some really fresh stuff behind me.


    But I was also peeing at the side of the road when a tourist bus pulled in with a whole bunch of Chinese ladies with cameras.
    #55
  16. RowBust

    RowBust Long timer

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    Lots of good suggestions but not much use if you have a broken leg. Once I fell over whilst stopped, leg was trapped under the bike and there was no way I could lift the bike or wriggle out, laid there for what seemed like hours until luckily someone came along and helped me.
    #56
  17. GPD323

    GPD323 Been here awhile

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    I fell over in my driveway and got pinned under my ZX14. Had to call for help. Not the SPOT! Broken collar bone too. I carry the SPOT when I do my trips, but mostly on road and not off.

    I called my neighbor, he came out and helped get the bike off of me. I had my cell phone in my tank bag so called Chris, did not use the SPOT!
    #57
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  18. davenowherejones

    davenowherejones short old guy

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    I am in danger of falling today at McDonalds. Can I borrow someone’s SPOT. Broken hip injury from many years ago.
    #58
  19. ZoomerP

    ZoomerP . Supporter

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    The light ADV Bike or Lightweight Camping Gear threads would be good places to find that kind of information.
    #59
  20. Tor

    Tor Making Life A Ride, One Corner At A Time

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    Don’t let the fear of what could happen make nothing happen.
    #60
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