Putting a 1988 Suzuki Kan of Tuna back on the road

Discussion in 'Some Assembly Required' started by mrchristian, Feb 17, 2018.

  1. mrchristian

    mrchristian Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2008
    Oddometer:
    809
    Location:
    LA, CA
    Maybe dumb of me but I didn't even think that they would be different. Inner carbs are 122.5, outer two are 120.

    I set all the mixture screws to 2.5 turns out. They were all set to 3 except for one of them was 4+ turns, weird. That one was the most fouled spark plug which makes sense.

    I took the float bowls off (for clean #2) and the gaskets don't want to fit anymore. Looks like getting hit by gas made them expand. No dealer in 100 miles carries them of course even though I have the day off. Dealers don't carry any inventory anymore at all. "We can order it for you!" Yeah, I can do that myself. Off to eBay.

    The carbs are clean-looking-ish and I think I can avoid the overnight PineSol bath for now. If they were super gummed I'd go that route though.
    #21
    Roofchop likes this.
  2. fast1075

    fast1075 Not a Lemming Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,712
    Location:
    Flaw'da
    I have been using 50/50 pinesol/distilled water to clean carbs for years, since the gubmint decided for me that REAL hairy chested carb cleaner was unsafe for me to use. It actually works very well and will not kill rubber or plastic.

    I learned it from a friend that buys and flips 250 ninjas. He uses the pinesol in an ultrasonic cleaner. He will buy a non-runner with title, toss on a set of already cleaned carbs, do some minor cosmetic stuff and double his money.
    Most of the time, the only thing keeping one from running is plugged up air bleeds from sitting with ethanol fuel. Man are those jets TINY in a 250 Ninja. I have seen them plug from sitting for a single week.
    #22
    crk, TonyKZ1 and mrchristian like this.
  3. Dino de Laurentiis

    Dino de Laurentiis Working on it

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2010
    Oddometer:
    414
    Location:
    Ultima Thule
    That the plugs are black/sooty only means that it runs rich at or slightly above idle (so mixture screw and/or pilot jet). To see if the main is too rich, you need to make a full throttle pull, then immediately kill the engine and roll to a stop. Check the plugs as soon as you stopped, since they only show the last few seconds of running.

    For next time, the best way to clean up sooty plugs is to heat the tip with a torch until the insulator starts glowing. That way you burn off any carbon deposits.
    #23
    mrchristian likes this.
  4. FTL900

    FTL900 White and nerdy

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2005
    Oddometer:
    1,103
    Location:
    Las Vegas
    1988 was the first year for the Katana 600 in the US, so Suzuki was paying out big contingency money for a Katana win.
    So guys with faster bikes jumped off of them and onto a Katana chasing the contingency money.
    Kurt Hall was one of those guys, campaigning a CBR600. When Suzuki offered the contingency money, he sold the Hurricane to me and bought a Katana 600.
    [​IMG]
    #24
    mrchristian and tntmo like this.
  5. Solo Lobo

    Solo Lobo airhead or nothing Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2004
    Oddometer:
    10,905
    Location:
    Shoreline, WA
    Dennis Kirk sells those NRC covers...link
    #25
    mrchristian likes this.
  6. mrchristian

    mrchristian Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2008
    Oddometer:
    809
    Location:
    LA, CA
    I had a few bottles of old carb cleaner from my dad that would cut through everything. Sad when my stash dried up. Although the B-12 Chemtool stuff is working surprisingly well. The expensive throttle body cleaner I bought doesn't seem to do anything at all.

    I for sure am going to try this next time.

    That is some neat history. Would be a good subject for a short Youtube documentary.
    #26
  7. grub61

    grub61 mild mannered maniac

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2014
    Oddometer:
    278
    Location:
    Oz - specifically Wollongong , if I'm home
    White vinegar also cleans up the brass parts of the carby pretty well too , and it's cheap and enviro friendly :augie
    As for the brakes , it probably has Tokico , or Nissin calipers. They are simple , cheap and easy to get parts for and apart from making a mess it will be a straightforward job to clean them up. My tip to get the pistons out without mucking around is to pull the caliper off the disk , take out the pads and then pump the lever till the piston comes out. You will make a mess , but it's way easier to get them out like that than trying to do it off the bike with compressed air or something like that. Generally they will have one , maybe two seals in there , because it's been sitting for a while it would be best to replace them anyway and you will be putting in new fluid , get a kit for the master cylinder at the same time and voila, new brakes :thumbup The recess where the seals sit is where the more hardened crud resides , clean it out with an old screwdriver or something, once you get them apart you'll see that it's a pretty simple job. I'd do it only after you get it going though.

    Graham
    #27
    mrchristian likes this.
  8. neppi

    neppi Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2017
    Oddometer:
    382
    Location:
    Tauranga, New Zealand
    A grease gun/press works the best for the stuck brake calipers. The hose fittings are the same, so bolt on.
    #28
    mrchristian likes this.
  9. Egoland

    Egoland Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2010
    Oddometer:
    68
    Location:
    Denmark, Scandinavia
    You put the caliper in bucket, and avoid the mess. Also: If one piston is stuck, put a screwdriver or something else in to jam the first piston that comes out, and the next wil follow.
    #29
    mrchristian likes this.
  10. DiggerD

    DiggerD DougFir from SuperDuke Days

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2013
    Oddometer:
    4,048
    Location:
    Mid Wet Or A Gun
    I pulled my carb rack of four off my 2002 Suzuki Bandit 1200 (B12) this month for cleaning.

    I opened the throttle loud handle clam shell on the bars and unhooked the cable ends from the throttle tube there, not on the carbs.

    I left the cables on the carbs, and left the carbs mounted together.

    Took the gas bowels off for cleaning.

    Not sure if you have the same arrangement, but could be.
    #30
    Hittman and mrchristian like this.
  11. mrchristian

    mrchristian Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2008
    Oddometer:
    809
    Location:
    LA, CA
    Took the belly pan fairing off and did a closer inspection of the headers. They're not as rusty as I thought. I'm thinking about just running them. The bike sounded pretty mean with the 4-1 exhaust on but wasn't ear bleedingly loud even in a tiny garage. On a more important note, I've always heard you need to change out the exhaust gasket every time you remove headers...for this that would mean every single oil change. Guessing nobody does that right? Or maybe they do? Do leaks matter on race bikes? Honestly I have no idea.

    [​IMG]
    #31
  12. grub61

    grub61 mild mannered maniac

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2014
    Oddometer:
    278
    Location:
    Oz - specifically Wollongong , if I'm home
    Having sat for a long time the exhaust gaskets might need replacing , but with this kind of fixer-upper it's probably something that you would do only if they leaked after the oil change. I'm not sure if they need replacing after every oil change , ask someone that races what they do.

    I saw a video on doing that once , i tried it but couldn't get it to force the piston out , just filled the caliper with grease and made a huge mess:lol2

    A small block of wood put in first where the pads usually are works fine , one piston will begin to move and press up against the wood , letting the pressure work on the second piston , and won't damage the pistons either :thumbup

    Graham
    #32
    mrchristian likes this.
  13. fast1075

    fast1075 Not a Lemming Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,712
    Location:
    Flaw'da
    See the springs on the headers? The flanges stay on the head. You remove the springs and the headers slide off the spigots. Buy or fab up a spring puller, basically a hook to pull the spring. Take them off wire brush them, and paint them. If you keep the bike, and want a permanent fix, send them to a shop and have then ceramic coated. It's not THAT expensive.
    #33
    mrchristian likes this.
  14. mrchristian

    mrchristian Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2008
    Oddometer:
    809
    Location:
    LA, CA
    Just what I needed to know, thanks!

    I live right next to an airport at the edge of a bunch of industrial shops so I'll try there. What's the difference between ceramic coating and powder coating? There's a powder coater near me. I usually walk in to whatever shop has a few guys sitting around with a few small bills and ask if they can do an "extra job real quick".

    It has yielded some interesting results such as this "weld" on my FMF pipe.

    [​IMG]
    #34
  15. fast1075

    fast1075 Not a Lemming Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,712
    Location:
    Flaw'da
    Powder Coat: Powder Coat is plastic dust of one kind or another depending on what you are using it for. There are hard powder coats, soft powder coats, etc. The process involves prepping the part, applying an electrical charge and
    dusting the part. The electric charge holds the powder in place and attracts it into every crevice. Then the part is baked, which melts the dust into a smooth uniform coat.

    Ceramic coating uses ceramic dust in suspension, usually in pure water. It is sprayed on like paint (sort of). The part is baked at a much higher temperature than the plastic powder cost. The finish resembles porcelain in texture. It is impervious to almost everything, but can be scratched off since it is only a few microns thick. It also acts a bit like insulation. I used it on my drag bikes. The turbos could turn the manifold orange hot during a run, and it would not fail.
    The headers on my bike in my avatar were coated. If they got a little dull, a quick buff with super fine OOOO stainless steel wool and it looked like new. Good Luck with the tuna.
    #35
    grub61 and mrchristian like this.
  16. mrchristian

    mrchristian Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2008
    Oddometer:
    809
    Location:
    LA, CA
    Still waiting for the float bowl gaskets so I haven't been able to get the carbs back on to test. Mechanic at the Suzuki dealership said it was pointless to not change the float needle and seat which I didn't do (and I believe he's probably right) but I'm rolling the dice anyway - Suzuki wants $52/needle+seat, yeesh.

    I pulled off the front master cylinder to look through and clean up while watching Man Lab on TV. I bought the "nicer" Harbor Freight snap ring pliers for $12 and they were useless on getting the snap ring out - maybe the $4 pair would have been better IDK. Ended up getting it out with a pick set. Inside of the bore is pretty clean so I left it alone. The top two reservoir holes are plugged up completely with hard orange crust. I let non-chlorinated brake cleaner sit in the top for a 20 minutes and picked at it with the pick set but it's still really bad. I'm leaving it for a longer stretch today.
    #36
  17. MR X

    MR X MOTORCYCLE MADMAN

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2008
    Oddometer:
    407
    Location:
    CANADA
    #37
    mrchristian likes this.
  18. mrchristian

    mrchristian Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2008
    Oddometer:
    809
    Location:
    LA, CA
    Super frustrating - burned a whole two hours up trying to deal with this bike.

    Ever since I disassembled & reassembled the ignition switch block it's been finicky. Decided to do a "permanent" fix and foolishly cut into the wiring harness.

    I substituted a Molex 3 prong connector for the connector that was already there...the thing is that everything seems to be OK. Left the clutch and side stand bypasses in.

    On the Molex, when I hit the kill switch I get power between the orange-white and orange-blue wires. When I hit the starter I get power to the green-yellow wire on both sides of the Molex connector so I know the connection is good. It should theoretically start. But nothing. I checked all the fuses and swapped them around randomly and nothing. There's power at the fuse. There's power everywhere except to the starter. Now I have a spliced up harness because I'm an idiot and wanted this to run.

    Dumb, dumb, dumb.

    [​IMG]
    #38
    crk likes this.
  19. mrchristian

    mrchristian Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2008
    Oddometer:
    809
    Location:
    LA, CA
    You guys have been an invaluable source of help.

    So I managed to fix the wiring by re-crimping the Molex and it magically started. Something must have been off on my first crimp job, not sure. Seems like I was getting power on all sides of the connector but...eh.

    Stuck 1 gallon of 15W40 diesel oil in and a FRAM oil filter. The oil has already changed color significantly just sitting in the sump and running a few times. Probably from the leftover oil in the jumbo oil cooler.

    It's running really, really bad and won't idle for very long but it's running. The gas tank looked OK when I first inspected it but the fresh gas seems to have dislodged some crud. Pulled the carbs again (#3) and cleaned the pilot jets which were goopy. Stuck some washers in the gas tank and shook it up and flushed it out with more gas. I'm running an ugly bulbous $3 FRAM in-line gas filter for now. Space is at a premium near the carbs/airbox so I'll have to find some permanent way to route the filter there when I bolt everything up. Kind of hard to find a small filter that will work with 3/8th fuel line.

    [​IMG]

    The idle adjuster screw snapped on me - brittle plastic from sitting outside. Went to Johnson and Wood and looked at every single idle adjuster in the shop before finding the one above which had the correct thread pitch. Was the last one they had! Lucky break. Works better than the stock one.

    Removed the exhaust per the tip from fast1075. Used a lot of PB Blaster to get the exhaust header to wrestle/separate it from the underbelly pipe that connects to the muffler.

    I'm still waiting for brake rebuild parts for the master cylinder but I decided to remove the front brakes and try and clean them up. Tried the grease gun trick and popped one side out although it made a huge mess and filled the caliper with high quality Harbor Freight marine grease. And I couldn't get the grease gun to release afterward. I used 100psi of air on the other caliper and the pistons popped out. Advice to future people - try that first before resorting to the grease trick. Haven't managed to get the other side of both calipers as I was finding it hard to hold the pistons in to direct air to the other side. Will take some fiddling.

    [​IMG]

    It was getting late and I was sick of dealing with stupid greasy crap and disgusting brake residue so threw the whole mess into a vat of Pine Sol diluted 50% and left it overnight. Figured this would make the opposing pistons a little easy to deal with. Don't care about the rubber seals as I ordered a full J&P Rebuild for both.

    [​IMG]

    Flushed them this AM and the gold paint looks OK. Still a little bit of grease but that'll come out with some elbow grease.

    This is half fun, half misery. Hope everyone is enjoying following along.
    #39
    Hittman, crk, XR4EVER and 2 others like this.
  20. mentolio

    mentolio Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2016
    Oddometer:
    306
    Hang in there man, you're doing good!
    #40
    XR4EVER and mrchristian like this.