Pyramid Bound! 4361mi adventure

Discussion in 'Americas' started by JBlackston, Jan 29, 2017.

  1. pranajerni

    pranajerni Been here awhile

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    hey westy and jblack, skip flores and ride straight to the entrance of tikal there is camping and a couple hotels there. i assume that is on your route and has to be one of, if not, the best of the popular pyramids ruins down in that area.

    staying at the entrance offers the chance to enter the park before the visitors from flores show up. there are also some great paths and roads which afford a walk through the jungle to access the temple complexes which for me made tikal unique over the others [of the popular ruins] i visited.

    also if you end up at palenque, stay at one of the many guest house at the entrance and ride up to the ruins. they are a couple miles from the entrance. try and find the T shaped door in the complex. it has architectural significance that can be traced all the way up into the south western cultures of arizona and new mexico.

    good luck with planing and executing your trip and if you have to skip something try to at least make it to tikal.
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  2. JBlackston

    JBlackston Adventurer

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    Awesome tips. Did you have any experience riding at night? What mileage did you average per day?
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  3. Sjoerd Bakker

    Sjoerd Bakker Long timer

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    Good points from pranajerni .
    Just to clear up any possible misunderstandings if you show up late at Tikal .
    The campground and hotels of Tikal which pranajerni describes as " at the entrance " are really well inside the National Park Tikal , at the service area from where the public is admitted to the actual zone of pyramids and ruins .NOBODY is permitted to enter among those ruins during hours of night darkness , other than supervised groups for sunrise /set .
    Do not expect the campground and hotels to be at the actual entrance to the entire national park . That entrance has a gate and tower arrangement across the main highway and is actually more than 12 km south of that ruins -entry museum and
    tourist service area. They ask you to pay at that highway gate and will let you in after dark to get to the service area start point .
    ( And to repeat common sense , it is unwise to ride the highways at night in CA , sorry )
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  4. Cannonshot

    Cannonshot Having a Nice Time Administrator Super Moderator

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    Hi all, just a reminder that this is Trip Planning and not "the basement". Petty bickering, mockery, and off topic carping won't be tolerated. If you think you have a point you would like to make with a fellow poster, find a proper way to have a polite discussion.
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  5. The Breeze

    The Breeze Been here awhile

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    I rode between 150 and 300 miles per day max....with a bunch of layover days. But I was traveling without time constraints.

    However, I do remember that I rode from Veracruz to Villahermosa in 6 1/4 hours. That's a pretty good data point for you, in that it's pretty much a "quota" road most of the way...which is the highest mile per hour type of roadway. I'm pretty sure the max speed limit on that section is 110 km/hr or 70 mile/hr.... So 293 miles/6.25 hours is 47 mph average. I know that I was running at that speed, because while my bike will go faster than that....it's the bikes sweet spot (I.e., smooth as glass...no vibes)...so that's the speed I travel at. Also, on that day, I just ate a big breakfast, then just stopped for gas, snacks (drinks), etc at the OXXO...until I got to the destination...no sit down lunch or sight seeing that day. So I think you could probably average a little better miles/hour on that section with less dilly dallying around....

    IMO, this is the fastest section you'll have on your route. The other sections will be slower....some much slower. Which means more hours in the saddle per day. But, this should give you a max/best case average miles/hour estimate for planning purposes.

    Additionally, I would recommend downloading the "maps.me" app on your phone....I found it to be very accurate regarding routing, hotels, and more importantly gas station locations (Pemex). This will help in your route planning.

    Also, it is "routeable" and will give you mileage and an estimated travel time between locations. For example, for the Veracruz to Villahermosa leg I mentioned....it's algorithm estimates that it will take 9 3/4 hours...but it actually took me 6 1/4 hours with time for gas and pit stops....so, as an estimate/starting point you could use that ratio to get a better estimated travel time for the other legs of your route. Hope that makes sense.....

    Based on the above, that should give you a least something to base a route/plan/timing on.

    My guess is that your going to have to be on the road at first visible light and will probably have to do some night riding to make this happen...but that's just my gut feel. If you do the calculation I mentioned above, it may show otherwise....dunno.

    Lastly, I'd try to do your border crossings at night so your not burning daylight doing paperwork....and thus maximizing your daylight ride time.

    Hope that helps!
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  6. flei

    flei cycletherapist

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  7. Westygw

    Westygw Adventure riding on a mini bike.

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    Still here.. still preparing.
    I've got alot of parts lying around not put on, yet.
    I got married, recently, so I've been tied up with all that.
    flei likes this.
  8. EdChap13

    EdChap13 Been here awhile

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    Have you ridden any 400+ miles days in preparation?
  9. Westygw

    Westygw Adventure riding on a mini bike.

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    Because of the wedding stuff and family matters, I've been busy lately, but I've edged in a 300 mile trip recently and I've done a 1000 mile two day trip not too long ago.
    My new seating arrangement seems to make a huge difference on comfort. My 1000mi. trip was in the rain on a flat cheap saddle.
    JBlackston likes this.
  10. JBlackston

    JBlackston Adventurer

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    Most of my ride prep has come in the mail, broke in my bike first 600 miles in almost 3 weeks. Our test run is coming as soon as the rain stops
  11. The Breeze

    The Breeze Been here awhile

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    You peeps still heading out in May??

    As a side note, I looked at the average logged speed in my GPS (which was based primarily on 2 months on riding in Mexico) and I averaged 37 mph. Further data that shows your plan may be feasible with enough hours in the saddle per day.

    Keep us posted on your departure/route/ride !!!
  12. slowriding

    slowriding Dopeless Hope Fiend Supporter

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    Now for my 2 cents. I have ridden in Mexico numerous times and through Central America as far as Panama. I suggest you heed the advice to not ride at night south of the border. Not only is that area mostly free range and livestock love to sleep on the warm road at night but there are no/very few warning signs about road hazards like in the states. The locals will set out some tree branches or a pile of rocks on the side of the road to warn motorists some hazard is ahead. It could be half the road is missing, a pothole larger than Delaware or a number of other things like missing manhole covers in towns and cities and on motos you risk serious injury or worse. Be aware that 2 lane roads are really 3 lanes, the locals will use the shoulder or what passes as a shoulder for driving and that opens up the center of the roadway as a passing lane for traffic going in either direction and it can become a game of chicken. Erratic driving by the locals is the norm, get used to it and be very wary of intersections even if you have the right of way. Final bit of advice is to be aware you will be in a tropical area the farther south you go, read up on the Zika virus and load up on long sleeve tops and long pants and don't forget the Deet.
    I hope you give this ride a try and regardless of how far you travel, that you both return safely.
    Bien viaje.
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  13. flei

    flei cycletherapist

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    Halfway through May....
  14. Zubb

    Zubb he went that-a-way...

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    Well for all the drama that went into this thread ... it would sure be nice to know if our 2 adventurers have successfully launched. If they have then of course they aren't going to have any time to post up along the way.

    Godspeed fellas...
  15. slowriding

    slowriding Dopeless Hope Fiend Supporter

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    Pity if the OP didn't launch, this would have been a epic ride. Anyone inspired enough to ride a Grom from the US to Guat in 11 days? I'll buy the first tank of gas.
  16. Yamarocket630

    Yamarocket630 Honey Badger

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    A co-worker rides a Grom. He's a small guy and usually riding only with a backpack. He says it struggles to maintain 60 on any sort of hill.

    I do wish you the best of luck. No matter if it ends up being doable for you or not you'll have great stories to tell if you go.
    TUCKERS likes this.
  17. snglfin

    snglfin this statement is untrue

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    waiting on pictures and tales of adventure... how far south did you get?
    best regards,
    johnnyg
  18. flei

    flei cycletherapist

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    It's June. You guys are supposed to be back by now. Hope everyone is ok. Let us know how you faired.
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  19. Westygw

    Westygw Adventure riding on a mini bike.

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    For some reason the website just updated me that everyone has posted, since forever ago.
    We did go on the trip and we had a couple accidents early on.
    We met a friend on a 650 along the way and slowed down to further enjoy ourselves.
    Due to technical difficulties, we didn't get many pictures. The GoPro broke, my phone broke, our chargers broke and I lost half my gear in a strap failure on the highway.
    I'll post a couple fun moments up.
  20. Westygw

    Westygw Adventure riding on a mini bike.

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    So, Mexico ended up being [mostly] fine. The day we set off I made a critical error packing all of my junk on my tiny bike, so everything fell off and got run over by dozens of cars. That sucked.
    We were so excited that neither of us slept, so we set off with 24h of no sleep and made it from Northwest Arkansas until San Antonio, TX.
    Somehow we got a hotel with a never-ending train behind it. Sleep wasn't good.

    The next day we were delayed a bit more because a long-time friend lived in San Antonio, so we went out and had lunch with him.
    It was getting close to dark when we got to the border, so we decided to not chance making it to Monterrey and instead sleeping in a motel at the border in Laredo, TX.
    Bad mistake. Sleeping on the side of the highway in Mexico turned out to be much more comfortable, for me.

    Oh yeah.. on crossing the border: It was uncomfortably easy to cross into Mexico. It took us about 2 minutes. Pay the toll.. good to go. We spent another 30 minutes lost trying to find the Banjercito (It was 50ft away).
    On returning.. we spent about 15 minutes in line and went right through.

    The next morning we stopped at a UPS Store to make a couple copies of documents and we met a rider on a BMW F650GS who was going the same route as us. We decided to ride together.
    We progressed through to Saltillo, broke the cardinal rule and drove at night (huge mistake), got hit by some traffic, ate some good food, slept in some crazy places and called it quits in Mexico City.
    We had a couple issues with funding back home in The States, so we decided it wasn't in our best interest to continue and risk running out of money. Thankfully the financial situation resolved itself over
    the next couple days.
    Our friend went as far south as El Salvador, though. He was a pretty cool dude.

    Along the way we had crazy antics happen such as:
    My gasoline can exploding.
    My entire luggage exploding.
    Hitting a speed bump so large at 60mph that my oil cooler was completely ripped off.
    Road qualities so low that half the bolts on my bike are still in Mexico.
    Sleeping at a Mexican Truck Stop. Sleeping with roaches. Sleeping on the side of a busy highway. Dog on the roof. Dog Tacos?

    The trip was a great experience and the little Grom did magnificently. My partner's TU250X had zero issues.
    I want to say seeing the pyramids at Teotihuacan was the highlight of the trip, but I really did enjoy seeing the Basilica de Guadalupe. As a Catholic it had significant spiritual meaning, for me.

    Here are some pictures:

    It was pretty freakin' hot, here. This is San Luis Potosi. We just got done eating and had a photo-op in traffic.
    The guy on the left was the gentleman we met. He stayed behind in SLP while we continued.
    18765602_10211440400158188_3292229714685742350_n.jpg

    We camped here. Now I can cross "Stealth Camping in N. Mexico" off my bucket list.
    18673285_10158582837980618_632595685670086410_o.jpg

    At a gas station in Oklahoma [I think].. you can see how ridiculous the Grom looks.
    For panniers, I fabricated some mounts and threw ammo cases on there. They worked well.
    18557179_1945129255723113_4039025834179108200_n.jpg

    Attached Files:

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