quality bike for Cent/South America...

Discussion in 'Americas' started by redelvis, Jul 24, 2013.

  1. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Oddometer:
    4,150
    Great stuff!:clap
    #61
  2. jimmex

    jimmex Guero con moto Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2003
    Oddometer:
    4,182
    Location:
    West Texas/Rico
    Sweet.
    #62
  3. Pete_Tallahassee

    Pete_Tallahassee Grampy

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2006
    Oddometer:
    421
    Location:
    Tallahassee. FL. USA
    You're gonna have a great trip.:dllama
    #63
  4. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

    Joined:
    May 29, 2002
    Oddometer:
    32,489
    Location:
    Fort Collins, Colorado
    congrats!
    here is a place to start
    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=14469062&postcount=32

    do the needed mods.
    get a better seat, bigger tank w/ lockable gas cap, skidplate, grease whole bike, stronger handlebars & hand protection plus add a security cap on the oil fill and go for it. bring an extra complete set of bearings, brake pads and some oil filters. learn to work on your bike and adjust the valves.

    ...just start reading and send $ to these guys: http://www.procycle.us/bikepages/dr650.html
    http://motorcycleproducts.org/Engine_Guards/guards-main-frameset.htm

    the only harder thing to find out there in the wild is a 525 chain and sprockets.
    #64
  5. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

    Joined:
    May 29, 2002
    Oddometer:
    32,489
    Location:
    Fort Collins, Colorado
    Les Trois Tetons.
    U live up in Jackson?

    #65
  6. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

    Joined:
    May 29, 2002
    Oddometer:
    32,489
    Location:
    Fort Collins, Colorado
    speaking of that,
    change out the front sprocket 1/2 through the life of a chain and it last much longer. i'm a fan of the 14 tooth up front. much better off the line than 15 and no issues on the top end.

    #66
  7. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

    Joined:
    May 29, 2002
    Oddometer:
    32,489
    Location:
    Fort Collins, Colorado
    hey check that out! DR650 now sold in Mexico.
    i know it's also sold in Costa Rica.
    http://suzuki.com.mx/motos/dr650se/

    it only took Suzuki Mexico 17 or so years since the bike came out to start selling it :rofl more than likely they see a ton of them coming into shops from all traveling gringos on DRs needing supplies.

    Mexico now sells the DR650 & the 660 Tenere :evil
    http://www.yamaha-motor.com.mx/xt660tenere.html

    #67
  8. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

    Joined:
    May 29, 2002
    Oddometer:
    32,489
    Location:
    Fort Collins, Colorado
    If you have the means, pony up the extra $ and get a Tenere.
    http://www.yamaha-motor.com.mx/xt660tenere.html
    It's fuel injected and competes with you GS

    #68
  9. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Oddometer:
    4,150
    The Tenere and Super Tenere have both been available for the past 2 years.
    Yamaha, like Kawi and the KLR are ass raping prospective buyers by more than a grand over US prices on top of the IVA.
    #69
  10. redelvis

    redelvis Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2013
    Oddometer:
    45
    Eakins: Thanks for the link to the 'information index' ! Yeah, I live in Jackson which is pretty sweet. Hopefully I can make my career work out and continue to live here.

    Ordered me up Wolman's Gen2 rack and Expedition bags. Should be here on Monday! Next purchase will likely be an aftermarket seat... anyone got one that will fit with an Acerbis or IMS tank they'd like to sell?
    #70
  11. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2010
    Oddometer:
    6,128
    Location:
    Passing ADV Stalkers in California
    Try to check ADV Flea Market forum. Search Parts, DR650. Seats (and lots of other stuff) come up quite often. Good deals go quick. New stuff every day or 3.
    Best!
    #71
  12. redelvis

    redelvis Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2013
    Oddometer:
    45
    Looking for some opinions... So I'm trying to get the majority of luggage taken care of right now. I've already purchased Wolfman Gen2 rack with the Expedition saddlebags. I'd like to get a Pelican box for the top rack and a Wolfman Expedition duffel to place where a passenger would sit.

    Does this sound about right? Will the duffel strap down securely and give me enough room placed there? Also, should I go with small or medium (pretty sure I'm not interested in the large)?

    Not too concerned about the Peli case right now, just if the Expedition duffel works well on the passenger seat and which size (maybe medium is too big to fit there, I don't know). Thanks for any guidance on this!
    #72
  13. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2010
    Oddometer:
    6,128
    Location:
    Passing ADV Stalkers in California
    Lots of options and opinions on this topic. Experience on the road may be what it takes to learn what is best for you. Wolfman are currently all the rage ... but not for me. Too small for long ride, racks stick out too far and too heavy duty.

    Wolfman have NO individual compartments and digging around at the bottom of a big black tube in the dark is not ideal (for me). Also not a fan of Roll Top systems ... but They ARE waterproof. :D

    For an alternative to Wolfman, check out Colebatch's bags. Not to buy, but just to get ideas about what works best. I know of NO ONE with more experience of 600 class dual sports off road than Walter:
    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=524638&page=112
    Go to post 1676
    Here is a pic of Walter's bags mounted up in Mongolia:
    [​IMG]

    Some prefer bags to hang lower (note Colebatch's). (note where Wolfman bags hang!) I'm not sure why Wolfman use heavy duty steel racks. Those racks do not take the load ... the over the seat straps take most of it. So racks need not be SUPER HD/heavy.
    Racks should tuck in close to side of bike yet protect bag from HOT pipe.
    A 4 inch gap between rack and side panel? sort of like a UNIVERSAL fit rather than custom? A mystery.
    [​IMG]
    Wolfman Gen 2 rack for DR650

    Giant Loop work for lots of guys. Certainly something to look at. Once again, access may not be the best ... but using a series of stuff sacks helps in locating what you need. Getting them on and off the bike and reorganizing may be time consuming until you learn the system. My panniers NEVER some off. I use internal dry bags. Grab and go. Bags stay on.

    I'm old school, still use conventional Cordura saddlebags. Easy access, holds lots, have compartments inside, flat areas for documents, fairly tough ... and did I mention CHEAP? :D Some fancier bags end up being $300 to $450. I paid $100 for my Nelson-Rigg bags, and $50 for the set of Happy Trail (used) racks (light, fit close to bike).

    If your rear rack is WIDE enough then the medium duffel bag should be fine. I use stock Suzuki rear rack, bolted a piece of plywood on top to allow for a LARGE duffel. The Medium bag will give a more tidy look.

    Wolfman bags are a bit small. Perfect for a 3 day dual sport ride or maybe a 2 week trip. For a trip to Tierra del Fuego ... they may be a challenge. Lots depends if you carry camping and cooking gear. The Colebatch rides through Mongolia had lots of camping/cooking gear. For Latin America, I would NOT CAMP. Hotels.

    But if you can travel light (easier said than done!) they you'll be fine.
    Resist the idea of continually adding crap on as you go. This can get sloppy and ugly. Too much is just TOO MUCH! Here are a few pics of NOVICE travelers who are still learning how to pack for the long road:

    [​IMG]
    Over loaded, no place to sit. :lol3

    [​IMG]
    Note top Givi case is BENT. 400 miles of washboard takes its toll.
    #73
  14. crashmaster

    crashmaster ow, my balls!

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,566
    Location:
    Alaska
    +1

    I traveled a couple of years with this set-up. Pelicans, and one roll top dry bag, and I still had too much crap, but it worked ok. I only carried that tire because I had switched to a knobby for the amazon mud, and the dual sport tire was almost new, so I couldn't justify giving it away. I rarely carried a tire, and when I did it was only a front that had a little life left in it.


    [​IMG]

    Daily stuff in the roll top tail bag. One Pelican had tools, tubes, parts etc, the other had camping gear.

    At the end of the day, unless I was camping, only the roll top bag came off into the hotel with me.

    In retrospect, I could have carried everything I needed in one Giant Loop bag with room to spare, and my tent, sleeping bag, pad, strapped to back of that.

    The biggest downside of the Pelicans is that they are wide, so you have to be seriously on your game high speed lane splitting. That's where the giant loop really shines, IMO. Keep everything more narrow than your handle bars and you are way ahead of the game. You will start out with a bunch of shit you dont need, and over time it will get pared down to a fraction of what you left home with.
    #74
  15. jimmex

    jimmex Guero con moto Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2003
    Oddometer:
    4,182
    Location:
    West Texas/Rico
    +1 on Giant Loop; it holds a lot of stuff and you can hardly tell its there, plus it provides a foundation to secure other soft bags. Just gets in way if :sweeti wants to go for a ride. The other benefit of GL is there is no stress on your subframe from attaching racks and consequently no failure of racks or subframe, a common problem on long rough trips.
    #75
  16. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2010
    Oddometer:
    6,128
    Location:
    Passing ADV Stalkers in California
    This is SO TRUE! Cracked or broken luggage racks are one of the most common problems we hear about. Even the toughest ones will crack over time and abuse with a big load.

    I'm amazed at the amount of stuff guys get into the GL bags. But when you see them trying find stuff and organize the next day ... well that's comical. Allow an extra half hour! But the advantages are clear, so learn the system and develop a packing routine.
    #76
  17. GSF1200S

    GSF1200S Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2012
    Oddometer:
    977
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    I've thought about switching to a giant loop and pelican 1500 for my next long trip.wolfmans are tough and have proved a good buy, but they hurt gas mileage and make splitting lanes tricky depending.

    You figure the 7 pounds of a pelican would be mitigated by losing the wolfman racks, and I would gain a lockable easy access option. Also, I'm not using my DSLR anywhere near as much as I planned because its a pita to put back in the ortlieb top bag. A pelican would mean I'd use the camera much more. The only negative I see is not being able to move around the seat as much as my current setup, meaning I'd need to stop more often. This would also worry me on steep downhill rock climbs where my butt would be near the back of the seat normally. I like to be able to freely move around..

    So here's the deal:
    Current- GL diablo tank bag, wolfman expedition panniers and racks, ortlieb top bag
    Prospective- wolfman pocket tank bag, GL coyote bag, pelican 1500 top box.

    Thoughts? Fwiw, my current setup hasn't failed me and all things have worked as advertised.. just looking for closer to perfect
    #77
  18. jonz

    jonz Miles are my mantra Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2004
    Oddometer:
    5,200
    Location:
    CA dez (it's a dry heat)/West Yellowstone,MT
    I used the Wolfman racks and bags for my 2 month South America trip. Worked perfectly - good choice IMHO.

    I carried a single medium roll top duffel for my camping stuff and had a small tail bag which helped hold it in place on the rear rack and rear portion of the seat. I hate a bunch of weight up high and out to the rear - that really affects the handling so unless traveling with the wife or kid on a street bike, I never use a tail trunk.

    I have never found a tank bag that didn't bug the heck out of me when standing but I didn't do as much riding which required standing as I would have liked so could probably have used one. I use one on my street bike and really missed having one.

    I ride with a Camelbak for water and a few tools.

    That carried plenty and if I'd skipped camping for the few nights I did, I could have gotten rid of the medium duffel.
    #78
  19. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2010
    Oddometer:
    6,128
    Location:
    Passing ADV Stalkers in California
    Excellent info! I have similar problems with a tank bag on my DR650. Not for me, especially standing riding off road.

    My Camel Back holds misc. stuff besides water: Epoxy, knife, patch kit, baclava, Lighter, Instant Skin, dummy wallet, tire gauge, valve core tool, Zip ties (big for tire mounting), LED headlamp ... paper work, visas et al ...
    And any small, fiddly things that need a specific, easy to find place to live.
    So, in part, my Camel Back acts as my tank bag.

    Great news on the Wolfman bags. I'm considering the Wolfman medium duffel also.I don't plan to carry full camping gear ... maybe a Bivi or ...?
    I know I'm carrying too much ... with time on the road I'm hoping I can pare down the load and simplify. Sounds like you've got it down well.
    Nothing like time/miles to perfect your system. :clap:freaky
    #79
  20. jonz

    jonz Miles are my mantra Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2004
    Oddometer:
    5,200
    Location:
    CA dez (it's a dry heat)/West Yellowstone,MT
    I used a cheapie rafting duffel purchased from Sierra Trading Post. Worked fine. I used to use a bivy bag for all my travels but I switched to a Big Agnes bag/air mattress and it's just too portly for my bivy. So I switched to an REI Quarter Dome tent - 3 lbs and much better in the rain but 3 times the weight. Still, I only camped in Chile and Bolivia a few times. The few times I checked established campgrounds, the camping rate wasn't enough cheaper than staying in a hotel room. So one could easily forgo camping and save a bunch of space.
    #80