Quit our jobs, sold our home, gone riding...

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by lightcycle, Aug 1, 2012.

  1. cavebiker

    cavebiker Old School Adventurer

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    Always a pleasure seeing what you guys are up to. I can't wait to see what the future holds, I'm sure it will continually get better and more fun. I remember back in the mid 90s when Cavegirl and I quit out careers to live in and traveled the Dominican Republic for two years on a motorcycle. That was the coolest thing ever and at that time I thought that was all we needed to do in life, thinking we did it and now we must just be happy working the rest of our lives until we retire, or whatever. Boy were we wrong. Once you see the light you never go back. You figure out a way, you make new plans, you change your life to the next level, whatever it takes you continue a life of adventure, excitement and happiness. You guys are doing it all and you need to feel great about the thousands whom you both have inspired. Thank you.
    monsterRS, BMRDOUG and Sunday Rider like this.
  2. 805gregg

    805gregg Long timer

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    Just think, if you had keep your house, and leased it out you would still have monthly income and a home to go to, and someone else paying off your mortgage, hindsite is 20/20
  3. lightcycle

    lightcycle Nomad

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    Thanks for that.

    We talk to a lot of long-term travelers, fellow bikers, backpackers, RVers, to try to get a sense of what life will be like after.

    Not a lot of roadmaps for when you're out this far.
    Max Wedge, DantesDame and cavebiker like this.
  4. TheNetworker

    TheNetworker Been here awhile

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    But that what scouts are for......

    It’s great to read how traveling this extreme xhanges the view to the world and life.

    That’s one of the reason I like reading ride reports from long term travelers. To learn lesson that life teaches them.

    So keeep scouting for us.....
  5. roadcapDen

    roadcapDen Ass, Grass or Gas, no free rides.

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    I want one of those T shirts!
    And I know you ship to Canada! Or I'll meet y'all in the GTA, maybe "F"aranga's on the Beach.
  6. Sunday Rider

    Sunday Rider Adventurer Wanabe

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    If that’s the case I want one of those T shirts too.
  7. farmerjoe

    farmerjoe Adventurer

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    Wuh oh - hope all is ok. Nice to see you guys here! I keep checking for status updates to see where you might be but didn't think to check ADV.
  8. xr-nut

    xr-nut Out Ridin' Around

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    who gives a crap?
    Please forgive this newb for my question, I am only on page 111 following along on your blog! 300 pages to go. So, my question, at least one of many... how you do know what doors to knock on "casas" to find your next room? I think this one was in Ahuachapan, El Salvador(on page 111 for example). Loving the ride report, you truly are living the dream. Ride on, ride safe- joe
  9. Spicciani2

    Spicciani2 Been here awhile

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    huh.... must be the format youre viewing this in... I have a total of 325pages
  10. xr-nut

    xr-nut Out Ridin' Around

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    who gives a crap?
    Im reading it on their blog- http://www.ridedot.com/rtw/114.html and as you can see, ive made it a couple more pages! just read about the dog named boob aptly posed near some boobs!

    edit :and and maybe Ive answered my question from above. I google hostiles in el salvador and boom, there are a lot of them! so with some planning and internet connection, finding them is easy. what does everyone do, when you roll in with out plans and have no google to rely on?
  11. Cheftyler

    Cheftyler Adventurer

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    I believe they're following along on the blog vs here on ADVrider, but I could be wrong about that.

    ETA: too slow :D
    xr-nut likes this.
  12. John2

    John2 Adventurer

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    Regarding where to stay. Easy, look for for signs, hotel, hospedaje etc. If looking for a particular place, write down a few places in advance and use an offline mapping software. GPS coordinates are the best. But, seriously, most of the world is easier and less expensive than the USA for travel. Also, most most small towns are similar, look for the church, swivel your head, and chances are you will see a hospedaje and food. I rarely had plans, just drove till I felt like stopping. Granted, plans are better for cities (traffic and chosen area of stay), and more affluent countries if your are on a "tight" budget.
    xr-nut likes this.
  13. lightcycle

    lightcycle Nomad

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    Haha, I'll talk to our sponsors and see what I can do!
  14. lightcycle

    lightcycle Nomad

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    Oh yeah, that was a nice one!

    In Latin America, hospedajes are easily found in the larger towns and cities. What we'd do is follow the signs to the centro historico. The closer you get to the centre of town, the more accommodations there will be. They are clearly marked by the signs above their buildings. And the larger accommodations will have signs on the road along the way.

    Find one that looks to be in your budget and then you can "knock on the door" to inquire about availability and price. They'll also show you to the room so you can inspect it. Easy peasy.

    If a hospedaje doesn't have availability, typically they'll know of similar places in their price range they can refer you to - and most will even call ahead for you to so you don't have to go out and knock on doors yourself.

    It gets a bit more difficult in the smaller towns and villages. It's good to know a bit of Spanish, then you can ask at the local bar or restaurant and they'll probably know someone who runs a small guesthouse. These are usually the cheapest because they have no advertising costs!

    If you don't know exactly where you'll be stopping for the next day and you do have Internet the evening before, you can do some research in the towns along your route and write down the names and addresses of some of the guesthouses along the way. So if you want to stop early the next day, you'll have a closer accommodation, and if you want to ride a bit longer, you'll have the name and address of a place further away.

    We may not know exactly where we're going, but typically we'll know a direction that we want to go in, so a little prep the day before makes the evening hunt for places a lot smoother.

    The only problem with doing this is that typically places that advertise on the Internet are sometimes more expensive than local places that don't have a web page. If the town/city is large enough, we'll typically just wing it.

    Hope this helps.
  15. Sunday Rider

    Sunday Rider Adventurer Wanabe

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    I will even pay! I am sure a few of us would love to get one and add to the beer/needlepoint fund.
  16. lightcycle

    lightcycle Nomad

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    We often get asked about the reasons why we undertook this trip. Was there any one precipitating factor that led us to quit our jobs, sell our home and hit the road with no plans for return? Unhappy at our jobs? Lottery winnings? Wanted by local law enforcement for making bad puns in public?

    Origin Story

    I love comic books. Decades before this recent trend of superhero movies, I was the kid with the flashlight underneath the bedcovers, thumbing through the pulp pages of Peter Parker, the Spectacular Spiderman and Detective Comics (Batman), while my parents downstairs thought I was fast asleep.

    These were the stories of my youth - Aesop's Fables with a punch (literally). Each tale crafted with a set of morals and lessons that never wavered from issue to issue: The good guy always wins. Crime never pays. Stay in school. Order your X-Ray specs and Sea Monkeys now!

    [​IMG]

    I was much older when I gained a deeper appreciation of the actual depth of narrative and conventions that went into these stories, beyond alliterative names and primary coloured pajamas.

    The most popular titles at the time featured some kind of tragic origin story that compelled the hero to fight for truth and justice. Batman's parents were gunned down by a mugger in an alleyway. Daredevil's father, a boxer, killed because he wouldn't throw a match. The Punisher's family murdered in front of his eyes by the Mafia.

    And my favorite superhero, Spiderman - acquired amazing powers through the bite of a radioactive spider, but initially used these abilities to get into show business. Then he failed to use those powers to stop a robber as he ran past him in the studio, that same robber who would later murder his beloved Uncle Ben.

    So sad! :(

    [​IMG]

    "With great power comes great responsibility". Heavy stuff.

    More time passes. We get into motorcycles. We travel. I voraciously devour motorcycle travelogs and ride reports. There are fantastic journeys, some small, some large. Some near, others from far-away lands. Most are short, but some are epicly long - spanning weeks and months! All capturing the excitement, the joy, the uncertainty and the freedom of hitting that open road and exploring the great unknown on two wheels.

    [​IMG]

    But I pay extra attention to the ride reports with compelling origin stories:
    • The guy who was diagnosed with a brain tumor, who made his long-time dream come true by riding his sportbike across the United States and Europe.
    • The girl whose brother died in a motorcycle accident, making that ride to Alaska that she and her brother always talked about doing together
    • The guy who survived a terrible car accident. Months lying in a hospital bed spurring him on to finally undertake that ride around the world that he always wanted to do.
    These aren't trivial comic book stories, but real life accounts of tragedy and triumph. But although their authors may not have been intending to proselytize, their tales are still modern-day fables and I was listening to their message loud and clear.

    [​IMG]

    I remember one of the comic books that I loved reading again and again was an issue of "What If?" The series hypothesized what the comic book universe would look like if key events never happened. What if Professor X never started the X-men? What if the Hulk had Bruce Banner's brain? The issue I most enjoyed was:

    [​IMG]

    Each one of them fails at being Spiderman because they weren't smart enough, brave enough, or able to overcome their inner demons.

    In each alternate reality, the Peter Parker in that world observes what is happening. He picks up the radioactive spider that bit each "Spiderman" of that timeline and backward engineers a serum that turns him into the Spectacular Spiderman, while learning the lessons of each of his predecessors!

    [​IMG]

    The story was primarily about destiny. That some things were always meant to be. But what I took from it was that:

    You don't need a tragic origin story to motivate you to action.


    We're not going to wait for a death in the family, a medical issue or a terrible accident to remind us of our mortality and what short time we have to do the things we've always dreamed about.

    So if you're reading our story and wondering what the takeaway is, it's this: Don't wait to get bitten by a radioactive spider. Go make your own spider serum and buy those X-Ray specs and stuff your side cases full of Sea Monkeys!

    Your plans don't have to be as grandiose as a cut-all-the-strings motorcycle ride around the planet. They could be anything you've always wanted to do but never got around to it because you're too tired. Or because it takes too much effort. Or because there'll always be time enough later on to do it.

    Because there might not be.

    So go skydiving. Run that marathon. Learn how to play the tuba. Call that friend or relative you haven't talked to in years because of that one silly fight you had that you can't even remember now what it was all about.

    [​IMG]

    Just because an origin story wasn't written for you, doesn't mean you can't write one for yourself.
  17. Jimmy the Heater

    Jimmy the Heater Dirt Farmer

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    Wow... Incredibly well said.

    I wish I could have taken that advice to not wait. Sadly I did have the origin story written for me by an idiot driver. They had to cut my Jeep apart to get me out. 2 years later I was doing the cross country museum tour I had always put off til someday and I'm leaving for France in less than 2 weeks. It was a painful reminder to do things while you can, never ever wait til someday.
    Tallbastid, BigEasy, Old fool and 2 others like this.
  18. roadcapDen

    roadcapDen Ass, Grass or Gas, no free rides.

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    Very insightful Gene!
    Yup, I had Sea monkeys too, never bought any Charles Atlas stuff thou'.
    CowboyFatBob likes this.
  19. Rich Rider

    Rich Rider Adventurer

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    I've been following along vicariously for a couple years now and this "raison d'etre" post is one of the most moving, eloquent and inspiring pieces I've read. I took a two week ride this past August to feed a bit of my own desire to escape and live my story. The hunger didn't go away. It grew. Your blog has been hilariously entertaining, emotionally moving when discussing real interpersonal challenges on the road, and inspiring. This post reminds me of two quotes I have pasted to my work computer every day:

    "Don’t let the fear of what could happen make nothing happen." – Doe Zantamata

    "Stop wasting your life doing something you hate.
    Jobs will always be there; HEALTH, DRIVE and AMBITION WILL NOT"

    Thank you for this Gene. It hits home hard.
  20. JoeBiker25

    JoeBiker25 Been here awhile

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    Your insight on the "why" behind leaving a secure life behind to head off into the unknown really touched me...I constantly dream of that ride to Alaska and even have the perfect bike for it. Just need to do it!
    Sunday Rider, mikegc and rubline like this.