Quitting my job to travel the world

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by atravelingteacher, Jun 2, 2019.

  1. vt700guy

    vt700guy Been here awhile

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    I teach middle school math in NW Oklahoma. If you find yourself in the area you are welcome to stay here.
    #61
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  2. motocopter

    motocopter ˙˙˙ƃuᴉɥɔɹɐǝS

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    Bike cover can double as an emergency blanket...
    #62
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  3. Jedi2Rider

    Jedi2Rider Been here awhile

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    For what it's worth, I've noted several RTW folks mention they have a cover and they feel it helps keep the bike secure.
    #63
  4. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    Thank you!
    #64
  5. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    This is also true!

    I'll probably start it out with it, feel out mexico before deciding to dump it or not
    #65
  6. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    Thank you so much! Really appreciate it
    #66
  7. yokesman

    yokesman Long timer

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    There are places in this world where personal space is not a concern of the locals, the cover and an alarm keeps the riders to a minimum.
    On those bad days , hot , wet or cold a more comfortable seat. we did buy a cheap cover in borneo, silver but it still cooked the seat.
    #67
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  8. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    Sorry could you clarify that top part? Are you saying with a cover and an alarm I’ll be ok for the most part?
    #68
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  9. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    So I initially stayed in Sedona for a few days, then headed out to California to meet my friends.

    What a time it was!

    It had only been 2 weeks on the road by that time, but it felt honestly like years. I think the reason behind that is because at home, things were pretty consistent. The amount of new things I saw skyrocketed within each day, and that's what I attribute the feeling of time to be from.

    Anyways, I showed up and we all caught up for a while.

    First spot was a botanical garden, which was actually really cool. Some plants I had never even seen before or known existed. Tons of different species of plants in different climates.
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    After that, we went to Encinitas, where I had known of this amazing Peruvian restaurant that I wanted my friends to try. We ate there, and it was just like last time. I got two full dishes I don't even remember how to spell, and we headed to the beach after. My friend and I noticed there was a surf shop renting boards, but it was too late and they wouldn't rent them out.
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    So we enjoyed some swimming and checking out the local area. It's funny how some parts of the beach are where families hang out, and others are where young adults hang out. It's like an invisible border.

    We watched the sunset there, and went back to the AirBnB.

    The next day was Death Valley. It was about 105 degrees out when we arrived, but when we got onto the sand dunes to check them out, it easily hit 115-120. Luckily, my friends had rented a car with AC so we could cool off in between stops.
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    Now here is the craziest part about the whole thing:


    My buddy wanted a break from driving, and gave me the keys. We're leaving the park, and get about a half hour into the desert. On both sides of the road, there is nothing but sand and small shrubs. All of a sudden, I see a Lexus veer off the road in front of me coming from the opposite direction. They fly off the embankment, got some serious air, and crashed down over a set of shrubs.

    I pull over immediately, seriously baffled this guy didn't flip the way he hit the sand embankment. He literally hit it perfectly so the car wouldn't have flipped over.
    Screen Shot 2019-08-22 at 1.58.07 PM.png Screen Shot 2019-08-22 at 1.57.23 PM.png
    The family was shaken up, but they were fine. He was just digging himself deeper into the sand trying to get out, so I gave him a hand. (Who would've thought the New England winters would have given me insight into getting out of a sandy ditch)

    I'm glad we got the car out, and the family was fine. They continued onto Death Valley, and we continued to the campground we were staying at for the night.

    To be continued tomorrow!


    Pete
    #69
  10. roger123

    roger123 Long timer Supporter

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    My '07 Wee and my buddies '05 always used oil on the highway or when riding very hard in the mountains. Mine had 75K on it when I sold it and it ran like a top. Just be sure to keep an eye on the level when running hard and you'll be fine.
    #70
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  11. roger123

    roger123 Long timer Supporter

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    I like a small 1/2 cover when trtavelling just to keep things under wraps so to speak. Takes up virtually no space if you use a compression sack and I feel it's worth the peace of mind, especially when leaving the bike unattended.
    #71
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  12. AdventureTrail

    AdventureTrail Wannabe Adventurer and YouTuber

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    In! #stromlife

    Safe travels!
    #72
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  13. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    From Death Valley, and after helping out the family who somehow hit the embankment in the only direction where they wouldn't have flipped the car over, we headed over to our next AirBnb. We stayed the night, and went off to Sequoia National Park the next day!

    It was definitely worth getting the National Parks pass, because it also accepts one full car load of people!. So we squeezed everyone in, and headed to the park.

    What a spectacle these trees were. Anywhere from 1,300-2,300 years old, and you could definitely tell. One thing I noticed about pretty much all the sequoias was they all had burn damage. After some thinking, I realized, how could they not all have burn damage?! They've lived through A LOT of years, it is inevitable in that time for them to have endured some kind of fire, big or small.
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    I was under the impression Redwoods were the biggest, but the definition of biggest has two different ones. Redwoods are the tallest trees, while Sequoias are the thickest.

    After doing a short hike there, we spent one more night in the AirBnB, and headed to Pismo State Beach, CA.

    We finally got a chance to rent surfboards! As an avid snowboarder myself, I really wanted to give this a shot. We got the boards and the wetsuits (thankfully, because it got pretty cold), and headed for the waves.

    It was tough to start, but I got the hang of it, and caught a few waves along the way. By far the best workout I've ever experienced, and within 2 hours I was GASSED. I couldn't even get myself off the board!

    While I was sitting on the board waiting for a wave however, this totally brought me to what I am going to do as my next stop. I am buying a board, strapping it to the bike, and surfing the coast of Baja, Mexico. I figure if I get ten days on the board it is well worth the money, and I plan on doing many more days than that.

    My gears are already spinning as to how I'm going to strap it to the motorcycle, but I'm up for the challenge!

    Anyways, two more days we spent at Joshua Tree, camping and having a final send off with friends before everyone went their separate ways.
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    The time with friends was really special and important, and it marked a turning point in my trip. No longer do I have to rush my way through anywhere. I can actually breathe, and spend time in the places I want to. Thank goodness, because my body was not happy with me after all those miles.
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    Thanks for reading!


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    Attached Files:

    #73
  14. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    My hairy desert run...


    Ok so I have to say I am grateful for everything that happens, good and bad, because it offers valuable lessons for the road ahead. And honestly, I would say it was probably best it happened in the States rather than in totally foreign lands to me.

    My lack of planning did this to me, but everyone has to learn somehow right?

    I wrapped up my time in California with friends, and it was time for us to go our separate ways.

    From camping in Joshua Tree National Park, my friends went towards to coast again, and I left to head back to Sedona. About a 5 hour trip door to door. I woke up early, gathered all my things, had a bite to eat, and hit the road.

    Now, the further east you go from Joshua Tree, the deeper in the desert you are. I thought I was prepared with some water and some snacks to munch on. Apparently that was not the case.

    As the day progressed, it got REALLY hot. (I know, it is to be expected in the desert!) But I'm talking from 105 climbing. I started to get pretty hot, and would spray myself with my camelback to cool off, accounting for a lot of my water usage. The water would cool me for 20 seconds, and just totally evaporate.

    So 105 ended up being 120, and I was really feeling it. I mean I started to get low on water, and noticed my gas gauge was dwindling as well. I stopped in some shade of a boarded up gas station for a few minutes to find the closest gas station, which was about 50 miles away. In my mind, all I was thinking was "I just need to get there". So I left the shade and kept going. I got about 25 miles in, and I'm totally out of water. I can no longer soak my body to cool off, and I'm getting really thirsty.

    40 miles hits, and my arms and legs start getting tingly. (Just writing this is making me anxious)

    It got to the point where I pulled over a pickup truck to ask for some water, and to maybe sit in the AC for a couple minutes, to which he replied no to both.

    I was getting really anxious. I have had heat stroke in the past working on a farm, but never in these conditions. I was pleading with the guy to give me some water at least, and he said no, backed his truck up and left.

    So at this point I'm trying to wave people down, and no one was stopping.

    I'm basically in survival mode at this point, and go into the middle of the highway to beg for people to slow down and help me out.
    This trucker ends up pulling over, lets me get in the truck, and notices how wiped I am. I was at the point of passing out as I got into his truck.

    He pulls out some water, dumps it over me, blasts the AC, and gives me another bottle to start drinking from. This whole time I'm pretty quiet and he is just helping me get a little more hydrated and calm.

    With the water and the AC I start coming to again, and we start chatting. I'm more listening at this point, asking him questions to keep the conversation going. I'm just in awe of the situation I had allowed myself to get into at this point. He tells me his story about coming from Iraq to make some money on the road. About his family, his future wife, brothers and sisters, everything. I was in the truck for about 40 minutes before he could tell I was feeling a little better, and really had to continue on his route to get to Phoenix.

    I have to be real with you. I cried in front of this man for how grateful I was that he stopped and jumped into action the way he did. I really didn't know what was going to happen, and the fact I had to go into the middle of the road for help kind of shows you where I was at in that moment.

    I made it the rest of the way to the gas station with the extra water the trucker had given me. I left my bike (which had about 4 miles left on the tank) and went inside. I stayed there for about 3 hours just drinking anything, and showering myself with ice.

    I was planning on continuing at night, but I ended up getting a hotel 10 minutes from the gas station, and went for a cold shower and sleep. (I laughed when I realized there was no cold water, it was far too hot in this area for cold water to even exist, and that was fine with me.)

    I slept from about 5 pm on and off until 3 am, where I woke up, packed my things back up, and realized the desert is nothing to joke around with. Night time riding was much better than day time, even at a cool 93 degrees.

    Did I put myself in this position with poor planning? Yes. Do I regret it? No. I learned the most valuable lessons about desert heat, rest and hydration, that I don't believe I will ever find myself in that situation again (although I never say never).

    My rule #1 with all my friends is "don't get cocky", and I totally got cocky.

    A humbling experience to say the least.
    #74
  15. Wayward Gypsy

    Wayward Gypsy Been here awhile Supporter

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    Mother Nature will always win.
    #75
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  16. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    Ain't that the truth!
    #76
  17. Jedi2Rider

    Jedi2Rider Been here awhile

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    +1

    Every. Single. Time.

    If you think you won once, you're just damn lucky, and she'll get you eventually.
    #77
  18. Jedi2Rider

    Jedi2Rider Been here awhile

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    Whoa! Gnarly story. Thanks for sharing. You've surely helped someone else avoid the same fate or worse.

    #1 -- Really glad you're OK. Remember that after dehydration episode, it takes 24+ hours to rehydrate, so take it easy, keep drinking (and eating to make sure your electrolytes stay balanced.)
    #2 -- Can't believe people didn't stop to help, and can't believe the guy in the pickup wouldn't give you water. Dem is bad people.
    #3 -- I like to tell my boys that there are some mistakes you usually only make once in life, and then if you're still OK, you've learned your lesson. Even though I am an Eagle Scout, I ran out of water on a hot hike once, just once, and it was a memorable 5 hours spent thinking of water, fruit, cursing myself, and suffering. Never again.

    I think the Dakar dudes are required to carry 3 liters of emergency water on the bike. This is in addition to their regular water that they are using for themselves. Sounds like good advice to me.
    #78
  19. Bigguy136

    Bigguy136 Been here awhile

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    OMG!!
    Glad it worked out. I've been thru that area but saw 109 for a high.
    A long time ago, I mounted camel back type hydration to my bike. My current setup is two 3 liter bags on the front. I like it so I can sip every 5 minutes when really hot. I also use one of them as a shower bag at night.
    20190825_200725.jpg
    #79
  20. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    I have since bought more electrolytes and take them as a "shot" each morning. It tastes a little funky, but it really does the trick.

    And yes I have definitely learned my lesson and will not be doing something like that again.

    That's an interesting thought! I like that.
    #80