Quitting my job to travel the world

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by atravelingteacher, Jun 2, 2019.

  1. Themastermike

    Themastermike Think you caught me in a coma Supporter

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    Bob Knarly dude.

    That trucker must have been like a mirage.

    Other wise you'd be "Dust n' Bones"

    Maybe the one dude in the truck didn't have water.... Who knows. With all the awful crap going on everywhere people can be pretty skittish.

    Note to self....
    #81
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  2. Golden955

    Golden955 Been here awhile Supporter

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    Glad you made it out of there with nothing more serious than a humbling lesson.

    I once rode Barstow to Kingman on 40 through the Mojave in August, left at 6am rode three hours and a half hours and that was with a couple stops to drench myself. It was over 110 and by the time I got to Kingman I was so wiped out I found a motel and slept until early evening. Later that night I rode through Flagstaff and it was 40 degrees. My body, with two pairs of jeans and three or four layers up top shook and shivered uncontrollably so much I had to stop every half hour for coffee just to warm up. In 12 hours I experienced a 70+ degree swing, my body didn't know what was going on. Stories that last a lifetime.
    #82
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  3. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    They definitely last a lifetime! Arizona is an interesting place climate wise. I guess the crazy swings are what you can expect near the desert though.

    Definitely going to start better planning, and not going as hard consistently from here on out

    Thanks for sharing!
    #83
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  4. yokesman

    yokesman Long timer

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    They wont make it beyond that first layer but certain places, india , mongolia. personal space is known to be almost non existent so the alarm gets exercised frequently. several layers of security are needed. By letting it be known that you are Not an easy "picking" ,using the bicycle cable or disc alarm, whichever is easiest to put on. this is while in view. During a stop to eat etc. but out of view the cover with alarm connected , the cable and some serious attachment to an immovable object. Not anything you are carrying you can do without, without it blowing the whole ride.
    This is especially true if on a time constraint, cant wait for insurance to process the loss in countries where its only value is as a sheet of paper.
    #84
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  5. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    Thank you!
    #85
  6. Sal Pairadice

    Sal Pairadice Captain Obvious

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    You gotta be some type of low life scum to be sitting in your SUV and refuse a begging man a drink of water.
    #86
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  7. Davidprej

    Davidprej Davidprej Supporter

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    This is just anecdotal, but I read several ride reports of inmates traveling in Central and S. America. Seems their experience with breakdowns is just the opposite of what atravelingteacher experienced. Or, more accurately, their experiences are more like when the trucker stopped to help. Of course there are a lot of scammers out there, but it seems that, given the circumstances, that possibility could have been easily ruled out.

    In any case, kudos, teach, for posting as it is a good lesson for all.
    #87
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  8. Jedi2Rider

    Jedi2Rider Been here awhile

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    +1 Totally agree.

    But it could be, as someone pointed out, that maybe he was out of water too...

    Or perhaps @atravelingteacher looked a little deranged in his dehydrated state -- wild-eyed, foaming at the mouth, hair standing up, incoherent ramblings, waving his pocketknife around...and scared the guy off!! :photog
    #88
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  9. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    I had the most fun spending the last couple days doing some bike maintenance.

    I ended up swapping:

    Clutch Cable
    Steering Bearings
    Full Fork component replacement (including Sonic Spring .90kg/mm)

    For both the steering bearing and fork components, I followed Black Lab's write ups. They are very well done, and he has important notes in there that help you not make really messy mistakes.

    A couple comments of my own I would like to add:

    In terms of the steering bearing replacement, Black Lab had it right about cutting the previous race out of the column. By putting a few notches into it, it was easy to pound out.

    When replacing the races that go into the frame, where the new tapered bearings will sit, I was using a PVC pipe to try and bang them in. It was important that if one side was going in and the other was not, to even it out again before continuing. This took a little getting used to.

    Also, with the pvc pipe, I got the races in til they were flush with the frame, then used the old race to really get a good grip and pound it in the rest of the way to the bottom. This seemed to help significantly, as I did not have the right sized pipe.

    As for the fork components, I was having some difficulty putting the guide bushing into place fully. I honestly think my main problem was being worried about the force I was putting on them. After a while, I realized these things can take a good beating.

    What I did was take the old fork seal, and put it on top of the bushing and washer. I used an allen wrench that took up the full gap, and used that and a hammer to pound the bushing into place. A couple taps while continually turning the fork, and it worked out very well.

    Once I felt a solid tap, meaning the bushing was fully set, I lifted the fork up a little, and the old fork seal came right with it. Then I replaced it with the new one, and called it love.

    With everything back on, I took it for a ride, and noticed the steering bearings were too tight because the bike was doing the low speed "swaying" Black Lab had mentioned. So I brought it back and backed it off a half turn, and now it feels great.

    The new fork springs with 10w oil give the front end a whole new feel. I definitely feel the little bumps in the road more, but I like the stiffer suspension. It doesn't dive like the old springs used to.

    Here is an abbreviated time lapse of the job. I really enjoyed doing all this before heading to Mexico, knowing I replaced everything I could in the front end.


    Check out the time lapse

    IMG_1044.jpeg IMG_1053.jpg IMG_1059.jpg
    #89
  10. mjs3800

    mjs3800 Adventurer Supporter

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    Good for you getting to know the bike. I used to dred taking the tank off my 11 Strom ... so much plastic and rivets. I did the Sonic spring upgrade and had the rear rebuilt and it changed everything. I could not fault that bike for touring.
    #90
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  11. Davidprej

    Davidprej Davidprej Supporter

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    Great job. Could you provide a link to the Black Lab write-up. I want to the same thing...eventually. Tks.
    #91
  12. Jedi2Rider

    Jedi2Rider Been here awhile

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    That is a hilarious "time lapse." I could almost see you doing the work in my mind's eye! :lol2
    #92
  13. Sal Pairadice

    Sal Pairadice Captain Obvious

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    Good luck is 75% good work. Your Strom is getting in shape. I am following with anticipation.
    #93
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  14. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    #94
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  15. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    I want to do a rear rebuild but it is a little too expensive for me at the moment. Hoping the rear will hold strong with all the weight for a while
    #95
  16. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    I have looked online in many sources, and it mentions USA is exempt from needing a visa to visit Mexico? Am I safe to assume this is correct and they will just stamp my passport at the border?
    #96
  17. mjs3800

    mjs3800 Adventurer Supporter

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    In 2017 it was under 3 hundred for re-spring and rebuild. Just in case...

    Jamie Daugherty
    DMr Performance Suspension
    (260)710-4049

    Edit : BlackLab has saved more Strom owners then he is aware of. Knowledgeable site.
    #97
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  18. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    So my time in Sedona has come to an end. It has been a very relaxing time spent at my cousin's house. I really enjoyed the fact that I had time to integrate all the knowledge I have gained about traveling on a motorcycle from the whirlwind of a trip to California.

    One thing that has stuck out to me in terms of what I have learned is listening to my gut. I would do it with most things, but on this trip there really is no option. Anytime I try to do otherwise, it always ends up happening the way my gut initially told me.

    I did have to go back through the desert, and this time was much more prepared and humble about it.

    I ended up traveling at night to a halfway point, got a few hours rest, woke up early and finished out the trek to San Diego. I am here now making sure I have everything I need for the border crossing into Mexico.

    I will be spending a couple weeks meandering my way down to La Paz, Mexico. I will be doing my first workaway at a hostel right on the beach for one week. I plan on exploring Baja Sur in depth, and from there taking a boat over to the main part.

    Pictures to follow once my phone decides to bring them over.
    #98
  19. Davidprej

    Davidprej Davidprej Supporter

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    May I ask what a "workaway" is? I'm not familiar with the term. Working away from home? Tks.
    #99
  20. twowings

    twowings Comfortably Numb... Supporter

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    I believe this thread's title is one of my favorites of all time...what a dream come true! :thumb