Quitting my job to travel the world

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by atravelingteacher, Jun 2, 2019.

  1. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    Glad you asked! Workaway is when you exchange work at a destination for 4-5 hours per day, 5 days per week, in exchange for 3 meals and a free place to stay. Because I am traveling on a budget while I am building my online ventures, this is a great way to save money on food and sleeping arrangements.

    My main place I check out is www.workaway.info


    Thank you! I am so excited to be doing this, it lights my heart up in a way I've never felt before!
  2. Davidprej

    Davidprej Davidprej Supporter

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    I'd never heard of that. It looks like a great resource for a soon-to-be-retired person on a fixed income who wants to travel. That is, assuming they don't just want youngsters like you. Thanks.
    atravelingteacher likes this.
  3. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    All are welcome for those types of jobs!

    Another thing you might enjoy is housesitting, look into it!
  4. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    I made it to San Diego! this place is really amazing. I stayed at USA Hostels for 2 nights, and the amount of people I met there was really cool. People who travel the world working from a laptop and have done so for 4 years, to others who it is their first time traveling. This place was full of amazing people. The atmosphere in the hostel was very calm, unless you decided to go out on the town for the night with the group.

    I'm only 27, but my part days are way over. Maybe once in a blue moon my college devil will come out, but I'm good with just enjoying a nice beer and heading home for an early night.

    I've heard of the cops being pretty strict about parking, so I didn't want to take my chances with the bike. The cool thing is they have designated spots for motorcycles, so it wasn't really that bad (plus they were free!)

    My last night there, I walked down to the port to watch the sunset. There is something about watching sunsets that really puts me in the moment. I feel that we all struggle to be present in the moment consistently, but man is it an amazing feeling.

    The weather here is just perfect. Not too dry and not too humid, a cool 80 degrees pretty much all day! I'm also used to the water in New England being mind numbingly cold, so the warmer water here is refreshing without wondering if you're going to get hypothermia.

    Off to the border to get to Ensenada!

    By the way, this Rasta guy and his pup were the hit of the town. He'd stop every block and people would ask for pictures with him. Insta: @ali_rasta_pup

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    Sal Pairadice, cdj, Davidprej and 5 others like this.
  5. The Breeze

    The Breeze Been here awhile

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    Just saw this post.....and I think you may be crossing into Mexico today.....so hopefully not too late to give you this info.

    The info you received online is INCORRECT!!!

    You will need the following:

    1) FMM (visa) which is a form you fill out at the Migracion Office and pay $20-$30 dollars. Tell them you are traveling throughout Mexico and need the maximum amount of time (180 days). They will then sign/stamp this form and then stamp your passport. With this document and stamps "you personally" will be in their country legally.

    For your moto, you will need:

    2) Mexican insurance (liability). You can buy it online and it is bound instantly. I use Bajabound....but there are many others. You can buy additional coverage for your bike as well, if you want. But liability is required buy law. Also note, that for your Mexican Insurance to be valid.....you must be in their country legally....so you must have the FMM/Passport paperwork/stamps.

    Now the last piece......

    3) If you were only riding/traveling the Baja....you would only need the above two items. But, if you are crossing on the boat to mainland Mexico....you will need to temporarily import your bike into Mexico....they will not let you on the boat without it. This paper work is a TVIP (Temporary Vehicle Import Permit)....they call it a "Permiso". You will need to make a deposit of $400US (may be less depending on the age of your bike)...this can be paid with cash or credit card + a paperwork fee of around $30-$40US. This paperwork is obtained at the Aduana Office. Sometimes the Aduana and Migracion Offices are in the same building...sometimes not. It depends on the border crossing. When you exit the country....you go the Aduana at the border crossing you're exiting from and make sure to cancel your TVIP. At that time, if you paid cash....they'll give you cash back....if credit card.....they'll credit your account. This is all legit and no need to worry about getting your deposit back. After which you would go to the Migracion Office and turn in you FMM and Stamp your passport out of their country.

    In order to get a TVIP.....they will need to see (and want copies of), your original Title or Registration (sometimes both) for your bike, your drivers license and your passport. MAKE SURE that all the information on your TVIP paperwork is exactly correct...especially the VIN number....if there is an error....make them redo the paperwork. If not, you will have a major league hassle when you exit the country.

    If you didn't get your TVIP at the border....I've been told that you can get it in La Paz (not sure where....I think the airport)....but they will not issue it there unless you have a valid FMM (which they will not issue there!!). I've read ride reports where people had to ride all the way back to the northern border to get their FMM!!!....So at minimum.....if you didn't get your FMM when you crossed into Mexico, go back to the border and get it now!!! While you're there....you may as well get your TVIP!!!....then you'll be good to go for your entire stay in Mexico!

    This will be the same process you'll go through throughout the America's. The visa/passport stamps...are painless. The TVIP/permiso can be a pain in the ass. In Mexico, it quite easy and should take no longer than an hour total....in Central America....it can take several hours....

    Anyway, hope this helps!!! Also, you make want to check out the "Is Mexico Safe" thread in the Trip Planning section.....lots of great information regarding paperwork, best roads to ride, hotels, towns, food, and places to check out.....very helpful inmates/info.

    I've travelled throughout Mexico many times on my bike and it's fabulous!!! Probably my favorite country to travel in North and Central America....Take your time and enjoy Mexico!!!!
  6. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    Thank you for all the info! I have since crossed the border, and they set me up with everything I needed for Baja. Once I get to La Paz I will take care of the TVIP. Luckily I have my title and registration with me, and I had gotten Mexico insurance for the bike prior to arriving.
    td63, The Breeze and Davidprej like this.
  7. dcwn.45

    dcwn.45 Frozen Rider

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    Great trip! I had a red 06 Dl650 that I bought new,I put almost 80,000 miles, British Columbia- Puerto Vallarta, rocky mts, blue ridge mts deals gap, etc.
    perfect bike!
    As many would advise, don’t rush, meet people,soak up the local culture!
    atravelingteacher and Golden955 like this.
  8. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    I crossed the border over to Mexico!

    I have to say, I was really nervous and did not know what to expect, but it was very simple and pain-free!

    With my paperwork all in order, I made it down to Ensenada. About a 2 hour drive from San Diego, the view of the ocean from the main road was so cool.

    My first night here, I stayed with a couchsurfing host. He was very friendly, and took me and another couchsurfer out with his friends for some beers and food. His hospitality was on another level. He brougth both us couchsurfers into his group of friends as if we had known each other for years.

    The next day, Jorge (our host) brought us to the open air market, and to La Bufadora. La Bufadora is a blowhole where the ocean water flies really high in the sky. To be honest, it's one of those things that you should just check out because you are there.

    But upon arriving there, I noticed something that lit my heart on fire.
    To see men, women, and children of all ages laughing and giggling like little children together when the water would splash them was something I will truly never forget. The joy it brought to my heart is indescribable.

    I feel that as a society, we don't experience joy and happiness like that enough. We are too caught up in our work lives to even sit back and enjoy the moment.

    Anyways...

    The next day I went to a hostel, and met up with a friend I met in the hostel in San Diego. We are staying here for a few days now and enjoying some exploring. We went out to eat a couple nights ago, and the next day was pretty rough. Montezuma's revenge in full force for me. I feel better today, but man was that an interesting ride. I realized people put lime on everything here because it kills the potential bacteria on the food.

    Another valuable lesson learned.

    I will be here for another few days before continuing to La Paz, about 1000 miles from here. I will hope to spread it over the course of 5 or 6 days, and try to explore some of the areas before I get there.

    I am excited for the workaway opportunity in La Paz, and the host said I would only have to walk the dog and landscape the backyard, which are both things I enjoy greatly! I was expecting toilet duty to be honest...

    Til next time

    Pete
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  9. Duanob

    Duanob Been here awhile

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    Excellent write up Bro! This should be a sticky somewhere if it isn't already.
  10. td63

    td63 Been here awhile Supporter

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    Great start to an epic trip, and in my experience we get whole lot more out of doing a little work beside locals vs. simply staring at them as a tourist. My wife and I travel as tourists and it's fun, for awhile, but I've also taught and volunteered a fair amount overseas and it's always profoundly more interesting and "deeper", for lack of a better word, since working alongside people builds cool connections it's hard to replicate in other ways.

    Also, just looking at stuff eventually gets boring; it's nice to put yer hands to work, especially if it's helping others.
    atravelingteacher likes this.
  11. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    I totally agree! Very well said!
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  12. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    After my couchsurfing host in Ensenada, I decided to get a hostel for a few days and relax! Ensenada Backpacker was an amazing place to stay. The hostel owners were beyond welcoming, and I met some seriously amazing people.

    The beach was great, the viewpoint at the top of a steep overlook was just as nice!

    I took a boat tour of the port, and it was cool to see the sea lions, and just be on the water in a boat again. It had been quite a while since I had done that.

    I met a fellow overlander who shared his story of traveling to Alaska from Argentina. Great guy.

    I met up with a hostel-mate I had met in San Diego, and we explored the town together for a few days.

    Now, I knew it was inevitable it was going to happen, but I got sick in Ensenada from the food. A few days of sleeping, drinking water and electrolytes, and sipping Pepto Bismol like I was back in college allowed me to get back on the road again.

    Ensenada is a great place to check out, and I highly suggest it to anyone who wants to see Baja!

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  13. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    From Ensenada, I drove south to San Quintin. I set up a couchsurfing host there, and was very glad I found Rodrigo.

    Rodrigo was very knowledgeable of the area, and even took me surfing! The beach was really nice, and the surf was just the perfect size waves for a beginner like me! Starting off on a boogie board was nice because it helped me accustom myself with the waves.

    Rodrigo is looking to create a tour company for San Quintin, something I think he is definitely capable of doing!

    A lot of Baja is more desert than I had expected to be honest, but I have really enjoyed re-entering into the desert much more prepared than last time in California. I am finally starting to feel more settled into this lifestyle over the last two months. I am thankful for this for sure!

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  14. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    Alright, this is a long one but worth the read.

    I was pulled over by the Policia Municipal today. Now I had read many things about how corrupt they are, and to just do your best to pay them on the spot and move on with your life.

    The officer pulls me over, and says I am not wearing a helmet, which is true. However, I had previously looked up helmet laws, and for most of Mexico, I read that you do not need a helmet if you are above 18. I explained this to him, but he was insistent. While he is holding my license, he is telling me I will not get it back until I go to the jail and pay the fine.

    I figured bribing the cop was in my future, as he was pretty insistent on getting money. So I asked him how much he wanted. He told me if I were to go to the jail to pay the fine, it would be 400 pesos (About $20). Instead of this, he offered to settle it now for 300 pesos.
    I was just about to pull the little money I had out of my wallet, when something told me to take my phone out and have him show me where the law was.
    He starts scanning a file that was all the driving laws for the municipality of La Paz, and tries to lie to me pointing to a different law! I said that is not what that law says, so he keeps scanning. Eventually he gave me my phone back and said give me 200 pesos, to which I said if you can’t find the law I am not paying.

    He handed me my phone and license, shook my hand and said I was all set!

    NOW:

    A couple hours later, the same thing happens. I get pulled over again!

    This time a different group of officers. I go through the same thing with him, but this time he actually shows me a piece of paper for a helmet law.
    I figured I wasn’t getting out of this one without paying, so I bribed the new officer again. What I noticed in both instances, the officers wait for people to not be present around the scene before they accept the money!

    Because we were on the main road, he said to me let’s go up around the corner so I can pay him. I bantered back and forth with him and his partner for about 5 minutes before moving around the corner.

    At this point, I remember I have no more money in my wallet! And he still has my license. A predicament indeed.

    We go around the corner, and he says ok you want to settle this? I asked him how much he wanted.

    Here is the best part:

    He says if I were to go to the jail and pay the fine it would be 800 pesos, so he would settle for 600.

    I said “how come two hours ago your comrade told me it would be 400 pesos at the jail and he would settle for 300?”

    At this point, I have his partner laughing loudly at the other side of the street, because he knew exactly what was going on.

    I look at him and said I know I think it’s funny too!

    The officer who was speaking to me said ok well how much money do you have in your wallet?

    I take out my wallet to find a whopping 20 pesos ($1), and start hysterically laughing! I said I have 20 pesos, do you want it? At this point, him, his partner, and myself are laughing like we are old-time friends who haven’t seen each other in years.

    He gives me my license back, rips up the ticket he was writing, shakes my hand, and they both go back to their car laughing saying “we are friends now”.
    This all happened with my broken Spanish, and needless to say I know how to say helmet, among many other things, in Spanish because of these incidents.

    It’s a learning curve, my friends! And I am just here for the ride, folks!

    'Til next time,
    Pete
  15. Sal Pairadice

    Sal Pairadice Captain Obvious

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    Wow, thanks for that story Pete. I suppose an american rider is a pretty easy target to pick out.
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  16. td63

    td63 Been here awhile Supporter

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    On the even brighter side, maybe you'll start wearing yer damn helmet! ;)
  17. atravelingteacher

    atravelingteacher A Traveling Teacher

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    definitely!
  18. Jedi2Rider

    Jedi2Rider Been here awhile

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    An excellent point!!