R1150 rear frame removal

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by Loutre, Jul 27, 2020.

  1. Loutre

    Loutre Cosmopolitan Adv Super Moderator

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    Hi fokes ! Currently trying to remove my rear subframe. I'm stuck with this bolt on both sides. Does this thing just hammer out, or is there something différent that needs to be done to get the frame away from the bike ? DSC_2175.JPG
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  2. Welshman

    Welshman B.U.F.F.

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    Its a through stud, so put a nut on and hit it, but I guess corroded into place. :photog
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  3. Loutre

    Loutre Cosmopolitan Adv Super Moderator

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    ok thanks so I'll leave some wd40 overnight and start hammering it out. I guess it's N3 from the part fiche right?

    upload_2020-7-27_17-12-0.png
    #3
  4. ricksax

    ricksax Adventurer

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    Use a more aggressive penetrating spray than WD40, like Action Blaster. Best to lean the bike way over and hope it will work it's way in. You also might try some carefully controlled heat on the ends from a small butane torch. You will have to replace the No3 in any case, so you might try putting double nuts on on one end, and then trying to break it loose with an impact wrench. Once it moves, you can drive it out (I hope). And of course, put an anti-seize compound on the new one on reassembly.
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  5. Welshman

    Welshman B.U.F.F.

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    yes number 3 :photog
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  6. Loutre

    Loutre Cosmopolitan Adv Super Moderator

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    :(: :baldy as if BMW didn't want the frame to be disassembled once put in place :lol3
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  7. The Fabricator

    The Fabricator I didn't know it wasn't possible so I did it.

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    I like to drill a slight depression in the end of the bolt. then use a drift [blunt ended rod] to drive with. The drift should be a few MM's less diameter than the bolt. Helps to keep the driver from migrating to the edge and deforming the threads. Drive one side a few MM, then the other side 2x MM, repeat.
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  8. PaulRS

    PaulRS Dutch fool

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    Stack a few washers on one end and put a nut on.
    Torque the nut, and hit the stud from the other end.

    Paul.
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  9. vagueout

    vagueout Long timer

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    If you are going to hammer it out use a drift softer than the steel bolt/stud you want to move. I use brass drifts, aluminium drifts and on occasion have used a length of whittled down broom handle.:*sip*
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  10. Loutre

    Loutre Cosmopolitan Adv Super Moderator

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    thanks everyone for all your tips. in the end that thing wouldn't move, too corroded.

    I used a dremmel tool to cut it off, then remove the frame from the little studs that remained. Since I'm replacing the entire engine, I'm not bothered anymore to get it out, I just ordered a replacement part for the new to me engine. Otherwise I would certainly have drilled it out, as it wouldn't budge even when applying heat and other high penetrating oil to it.
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  11. Loutre

    Loutre Cosmopolitan Adv Super Moderator

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    on another note: those centerstand bolts (the one going through the engine) what a bitch to remove as well. Learned my lessons from this engine, everything that goes through the engine or needs to be removed to access bigger parts will be covered in grease.
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  12. PukaWai

    PukaWai Long timer

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    some good anti-sieze would be even better.
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  13. Francistor83

    Francistor83 Been here awhile

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    So how many km did the first engine have? Where did you source the new one?

    Thanks!
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  14. Loutre

    Loutre Cosmopolitan Adv Super Moderator

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    First one had 196000kms. Still gutted that it didn't make it to the 200k. The engine was mostly working but corrosion took a toll on some of the components like the the two threads where you fix your starter. They disintegrated and made it move thus eating up the flywheel.

    I repaired that twice with helicoils but recently it failed again and I want to put a hack on the bike to ride with my dog.

    Long story short I prefer changing the engine and making it repliable again.

    New engine came from ebay. 40k kms off an 04' GS for just 550€ including shipping. It was too good to pass on.
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  15. Francistor83

    Francistor83 Been here awhile

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    Indeed a very good deal. If memory serves me well, ABS removed sometime before, at least one driveshaft changed, anything else major? Original clutch?
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  16. Loutre

    Loutre Cosmopolitan Adv Super Moderator

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    very good memory indeed.

    ABS removed about 60k before IIRC. One driveshaft went out at 111k, clutch was changed by previous owner at 60k (I bought it at 80) but he was mostly riding in Paris and around the Peripherique which took a lot of stress on the dry clutch (looking at your location you must know a thing or two regarding that).

    I changed the next driveshaft at 180k, not because the old one was dead, but because I found an entire used unit off ebay (you see a pattern here right?) for 70 EUR which had almost no kms on it. So I preferred swapping as the one I installed already had 40k when I bought it and it added up to about the same total kms that the previous one failed on me. I plan on getting this one serviced once I have the time.

    I changed the second clutch at 184k kms. Not because it failed but because I had to change the flywheel back then, because one of my starters moved and grinded the teeth. So while already in there...

    Last big thing was the big rear wheel bearing at 145k kms. I found metal chunks in the oil (changing it every 10kms to look for chunks). When I removed it, it was flawless. Turns out it was the smaller needle bearing inside which had failed, so I replaced both.

    Otherwise it has been good to me. I ride year round, so even during winter it never let me down. I always carry with me a spare stick coil just in case, but I love this bike too much to sell it. For the little value it still holds I prefer repairing it, changing parts and continue to drive around with it. I have the same kind of love / hate story with my 800GS where I changed the engine during our covid lockdown. It had 114k kms on the clock but had an engine failure in october 2018. I found a used engine with 3k kms on ebay for around 600 EUR.
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  17. Francistor83

    Francistor83 Been here awhile

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    I do :) And many ABS failures probably came from city riders in big cities holding the lever and using brakes more often. (I barely ride mine downtown, FYI).

    Any sign/noise of the driveshaft about to fail?

    How many pivot bearings? Just changed mines at 65k km, they were toast. Tried to install the Nylatrons but probably got an early batch a few years before and couldn't install them...so bought OEM ones.

    How did your splines look when replacing the clutch?

    It's nice you've been treating your bikes so nicely. Congrats!

    I don't want to sell mine either, it would be such a waste compared to the time and money I've put on her.
    #17
  18. Loutre

    Loutre Cosmopolitan Adv Super Moderator

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    regarding the driveshaft it was quite weird. Nothing noticeable before failure. Mine just seized and snapped off where the gearbox is.

    Pivot bearings were replaced just once at the same time the driveshaft failed so at 111k. From the invoiced I had from the previous owner he didn't replace them. I replaced them with the nylatrons nushings from an inmate here. I got the first batch where you didn't have the cutout for the spacer. They are still holding up well. When he created the updated version, I bought a pair but haven't installed them yet. I guess I'm waiting on my old ones to fail to do that (If it ain't broke don't fix it, right?).

    The splines looked like new. I don't remember if it's GSaddict or Steptoe (or another inmate) who says that basically your splines are either toast around the 60k mark and you have a bad unit, or they will last forever. Thankfully it seems like I have the latter one.

    I don't know if I treat my bikes so nicely. I like to travel a lot with them and keep them around. I prefer doing pre-emptive maintenance before anything major breaks down. After haven ridden both for more than 100k kms through winter, mud and rain, it was just time to replace the engines. The paint is flaking off and I started to have more and more smaller issues coming up. Parts are cheaper than ever and if you have the time it's not that difficult to do. Changing the engines from both bikes can be done in 3 days. Most of it is a one man job. The only thing is you need another person to align the frames.

    Funny enough the 1150 engine is lighter than the 800 one. Without flywheel assembly it was under 50kg for shipping. The 800 with still the clutch and flywheel was 76kg shipped. I can move around the 1150 engine without any issue, while I couldn't do more than lift the 800 a couple of cms from one place to another.
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  19. mouthfulloflake

    mouthfulloflake Not afraid

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    How could you not install Nushings?

    Did you get them from me?
    Or some knock offs?


    #19
  20. lewisjr1

    lewisjr1 Long timer Supporter

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    He purchased both ver. 1 and 2 from you, installed the first, and is holding the second as backup. That'll take awhile.

    He's my kind of guy, likes belt + suspenders.
    #20