Rally-Raid Products Honda CB500X

Discussion in 'Vendors' started by ktmmitch, Sep 22, 2014.

  1. Wind_Rider

    Wind_Rider Been here awhile

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    look in the Gear / Flea Market / Bikes section of this site and just search for CB500X. Also the AZ Craigslist. If you find one already built it will save you some time. In my own workshop with my familiar tools it took me a couple of days and about 4 beers to install the whole kit. If you are a skilled Moto mechanic it could probably be done in one day.

    If you have a few months to shop ahead of your trip you can likely find one ready to go. I sold my RR CB earlier this week and they pop up from time to time in the flea market.
  2. Brokenhorse

    Brokenhorse n00b

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    tdella11 pm sent
  3. Rob-Houston

    Rob-Houston Adventurer

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    Juan Browne update: https://youtu.be/7m1xcX

    What bike is he riding here? Where's his CB500x?
    Perfect example of Californicate STUPID! :imaposer(Not refering to Juan) :D
  4. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    That is a Suzuki DR200.

    The issue is not 'California' per se - In a nutshell, it is the power company PG&E trying to protect themselves from the thread of prosecution if damaged cables are found to be the cause of a wildfire, and are effectively holding California to ransom - of course one might suggest that company ought to be investing in more appropriate insulated cable routing in rural areas, rather than letting their executives cream off the profits for over-inflated salaries while the company which is now on the verge of bankruptcy continues to hemorrhage money.

    Jx
    dirtytroll and bmah like this.
  5. sscardefield

    sscardefield Adventurer

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    Hello folks,

    I am struggling with tire selection for my new Rally Raid tubed type wheels. There are very, very few 150/70R17 TT style tires, they are all TL. I noticed even the TKC80's that everybody runs on these wheels are TL's. I understand that you can run a tube in a tubeless type tire, but I was under the impression that in general it's not a good idea for full time use, more of an emergency get me off the trail type of scenario. In doing some more reading it seems to depend on the construction of the TL tire on whether or not it can be used full time with a tube. I guess my question is, how do I know which TL style tires I can safely run on my Rally Raid TT style wheels?

    Thanks!
  6. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    Hi sscardefield - you can run a tube inside a tubeless tyre with no problem whatsoever, it's the other way around you can't/shouldn't do - ie. try and run a Tube Type tyre without a tube, as typically the bead of those tyres are not designed to seat on the rim tubelessly.

    These days, almost all tyre manufacturers make a 150/70x17 rear tyre with a tubeless carcass, as a lot of 'adventure' bikes have cast wheels that are tubeless by design - but again, there is nothing to stop you using a tube in those tyres if you're fitting them to a bike with non-tubeless spoked wheels. People do it all the time.

    That said, the Rally-Raid spoked wheels are designed to accept a more narrow rear tyre than 150 anyway if you wish, and recommend a 140 width for improved 'nimbleness' both off and on road.

    As always, Rally-Raid (and myself) continue to recommend the Continental TKC80s for this bike - I've ridden many tens of thousands of miles on this bike with these tyres and they just work really well both on and off road. Ideally the sizes you want for the CB with RR wheels would be 110/80x19 front, and 140/80x17 rear, tubes or not.

    Hope that clarifies things!

    Jenny x
  7. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    2019 indicators (turn-signals) on earlier bikes

    A pre-[r]ambling introduction... For a while now I've wanted to replace my big orange egg-shaped turn-signals on my 2014 model with something slimmer and sleeker looking... of course there is nothing wrong with the OEM indicators - indeed they are excellent at what they are designed to do, being very bright and also pretty robust [in the event of a drop], and other than the running light filament [in the US spec bikes] blowing on a couple of occasions, they have proved faultless through many tens of thousands of miles. Honda also use them on any number of their other models too, so their track record is proven.

    However, ever since the new Africa Twin came out in 2016 with it's slim LED indicators (only in Europe the first year), I always felt the traditional filament bulb style lamps now look a bit bulky and dated? At the time I bought a set of the Africa Twin indicators, thinking they'd be essentially plug-and-play together with simply swapping the OEM flasher relay for an LED specific one (note. it's a four-pin relay on the CB, and a dedicated replacement designed to maintain the original flash rate with LEDs is cheaply and readily available on Ebay for example) - only to find those original first generation [ie. 2016] Africa Twin LED turn signals were actually 7.4v and also required a stupidly expensive step-down transformer relay to drive them... yes, I blew two of them before I realised*... at least I was able to return the other two.

    *there is tiny printing on the lens of each lamp stating the voltage.

    So I shelved that idea until more recently when Honda started fitting [very similar shaped] LED turn signals on their latest generation of bikes, and a quick noodle at the parts fiche revealed that these latest ones (which are also fitted to the 2019 CB500X of course) are traditional 12+ volt LEDs and don't require any special transformer/relay, just a regular LED relay designed to maintain the original flash rate with less load - which is something I now already had on my bike of course.

    So enough of the waffle Jenny - what do you need to fit the 2019 style turn signals on an earlier generation CB500X?

    First of all, the front and rear turn signals are different - the fronts include an extra wire (as did the US spec earlier style) for running lights, but otherwise physically they are the same shape - and here a size comparison with my existing lamps:

    [​IMG]

    As you can see, they are not actually any shorter - which personally I think is a good thing, since the whole reason for sticking with OEM style turn-signals and not tiny little aftermarket variants, is so that I can actually be seen in the chaos that is California traffic...

    However, I trust you agree the longer/thinner lens section immediately looks much more contemporary and gives the visual effect of them being much more compact?

    So along with the FL, FR, RL and RR individual lamps (see parts list below), you'll also need the matching rubber mounting boots/grommets, plus the metal inserts for those - and four M5 bolts to sandwich them all together.

    note. If you look on the 2019 parts fiche, you'll see the rear rubber mounts and metal inserts are both slightly longer, and a slightly different shape - this is because the rear turn signals mount to the same 'eye' shaped recess in the tail piece (which is carried over from the previous generation model), while at the front, the new fairing has recesses specifically to match the revised shape of the LED turn signals.

    However, Honda being Honda, I was confident that the actual oval section of these rubbers that fits through the body panels would still be the same, and it is:

    [​IMG]

    ...which means I elected to buy two pairs of front rubbers and their corresponding inserts, as these are lower profile and also cheaper than using the dedicated rear mounts - and that other than a slight difference in the tear-drop shape of the outer flange (which really isn't noticeable unless you really know what you're looking for), they bolt right up and still look 'factory'*

    *note. if you really are being precious, there is nothing to stop you ordering two pairs of the rear rubber mounts (and their metal inserts) instead, which have the exact 'eye' profile to match the earlier generation tail and headlight fairing recesses - but these are essentially twice the price of the new shape/front mounts.

    [​IMG]


    Rear turn signal mounting

    The rear pair of turn-signals have only two wires, and are plug-and-play into the existing connectors on the loom - you just unplug the old ones, and fit the new ones in their place.

    note. The LED turn signals require a separate bolt to mount them (rather than having the threaded part on the lamp unit, and just a dome nut to secure as the earlier lamps do), and if like me you're using the front rubbers all round, you'll simply need four 20mm long M5 bolts to mount them - you can order the Honda ones of course, but I simply used some button-heads I already had in my metric stash at home.



    Front turn signal mounting

    At the front, things are slight different - you can still 'plug and play', but you need to do some plug swapping first...

    [​IMG]

    As you can see, while the earlier generation lamps had a single block connector with three terminals, the 2019 LED version for the CB has the flasher as a pair, plus the third [running light] wire is on a separate plug... why? goodness only knows - particularly as the very similar looking turn signals on the CB300R (for example) seem to just use a single (three pin) plug as before.

    However, it is actually easy enough to unclip the pins from the existing block connectors, and swap all three wires from the new lamps into the connector from the originals, so that they just plug straight back in to the loom as before.

    note. You could be an animal and either cut off the original connector blocks and re-solder the joints, or even cut both ends off and use your own bullets or similar - but why would you when you can do a pukka job as long as you have a tiny flat-blade screwdriver (or similar poiky piece) to unclip the tangs and slide the pins out.

    [​IMG]


    I would admit that while the two flasher pins are easy to unclip, the third (running light) pin can be an utter bastard to undo, as you can't see inside the tiny hole... I'm sure there is a proper tool to do this job, but as I say, with a little perseverance, it's possible with a small 'watchmakers' screwdriver for example.

    [​IMG]

    One thing to note at the front, is that for some reason, the LED + and - wires are reversed in the 2019 block connector/loom, so when you reconnect them in the three pin block, make sure they match up with the actual loom on the bike, as LEDs don't work with reversed current.

    So with that little job done, all you need to do is mount them to the front on the bike in a similar fashion - note. it is far easier to remove the whole fairing assembly and work with it on your lap upside down than to try and fiddle around with the connectors and bolts from underneath!

    cont.
    ncroadtoad, Herman1 and dirtytroll like this.
  8. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    cont.


    [​IMG]
    photo. front LED turn signals include a running light circuit on US spec bikes.


    [​IMG]
    photo. being OEM, they are just as bright as the filament style ones they replace.


    [​IMG]
    photo. view from the cockpit - much more contemporary!


    [​IMG]
    photo. and from the front, very tidy thank you!


    [​IMG]
    photo. similarly at the rear - they also work really nicely with the R&G tail-tidy too.


    [​IMG]
    photo. close-up of backside.


    [​IMG]
    photo. close-up of front. you can see how the 2019 style rubbers are only a slightly different shape to the previous version, and as I mention above, if this bothers you at all, then you can always buy two pairs of the 2019 rear rubbers, which are slightly longer, but do have the exact profile to fit the 2013-18 model recesses.


    So that is pretty much it!


    List of parts required:


    33450-MKP-A01 Turn Signal L. FR (x1)

    33400-MKP-A01 Turn Signal R. FR (x1)

    33650-MKP-A81 Turn Signal L. RR (x1)

    33600-MKP-A81 Turn Signal R. RR (x1)


    33452-KZZ-J00 Rubber L (x2)

    33412-KZZ-J00 Rubber R (x2)


    33415-KZZ-J00 Collar, Turn Signal (x4)


    note. you do need to buy 2 x left and 2 x right rubbers, as they are shaped inside to mate up with the corresponding tabs in the lamp unit assembly. The metal inserts (collars) are all the same however.

    As I mention above, the only other thing/s you’ll need is 4 x 20mm long M5 bolts - to mount each turn-signal in place; plus a replacement LED specific flasher relay for the CB500X (Ebay).


    Hope that helps, or at least inspires!


    Jenny x
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  9. speedmaster

    speedmaster Been here awhile

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    Hello, is there any sort of way to determine if your suspension is too stiff? I have a Rally Raid level 2 conversion and am pretty happy with it, but I am a little worried about the front suspension. It’s definitely working but seems stiff. I don’t do a lot of harsh off-road riding but do a lot of washboard gravel roads and forest service roads (for those familiar the first 3 miles of the Steens mountain loop road as an example). The bike stays planted and is very controllable, but the ride transmits some harsh bumps up the handlebars.

    My only source of comparison is a 250cc enduro with 11 inches of suspension.

    Also, should note that I have the preload adjusters backed all the way off. Sag is about 1.125 – 1.25 inches and I have the stiffer springs.
  10. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    Hi Speedmaster - if the bike feels planted and stable, then it's doing it's job... you have to remember that compared to your [competition] enduro bike with 11 inches of travel, the CB forks are a very basic [open bath] design, with modest stanchion dimensions and significantly shorter travel - so it's never going to feel like a pukka dirt-bike in that regard - unless you fit similar specification forks...

    However, it does sound like you might have your set-up a little stiff - or at least stiffer than you'd like for the terrain you're riding, so consider the following:

    First of all, if you've backed the preload adjusters all the way out and you've still only got an inch & an eighth to an inch & a quarter of sag on a 7" travel bike, then yes, it's sounds like you don't/didn't need the stiffer of the two spring rates after-all (most people don't to be honest).

    Although you've only got 7" to play with (ooh er missis), you ought to be using most of that up on bigger hits - there is no point in having travel if you don't use it, and fundamentally, for a bike to feel 'plush' over a variety of terrain, it ought to be sitting somewhere closer to the middle of the travel so it floats between the extremes, not up towards one end in an effort to maximise compression travel for the odd occasion you get clumsy and hit a big hole a bitt too hard*.

    * if you are doing that with any regularity, I'd suggest you take your 250cc enduro bike instead ;o)

    Your sag ought to be between 35-50mm on a LEVEL 2 bike (that is 1.5 to 2" imperial), so I'd suggest swapping the fork springs for the softer/regular weight is your first port of call, then tune the sag with the preload adjusters - which currently aren't doing anything if your spring is too stiff in the first place.

    I'd also recommend you use a 5w fork oil, as for off-road use particularly, it means the damping reacts more quickly so doesn't pack-down in the same way, transferring any vibrations through to the bars.

    Ultimately though, you are riding a 400+lb 'adventure' bike, not a lightweight dual-sport/enduro, so your expectations need to be adjusted slightly and your line-choice etc. considered more carefully if you're going to start to ride more aggressively off-road.

    Hope that helps!

    Jenny x
  11. Oyabun

    Oyabun 親分

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    That certainly seems to stiff to me.
    While the RR L2 with its 7-ish inch travel and higher weight won't be the same as a 250 dirt jumper on 11" travel suspension, but it is fairly good for an adventure bike.
    Front rider sag should be roughly 1/4 of total travel, and rear somewhere between 1/4 and 1/3. So your 1.25 is rather on the stiff side.
    As usual, Jenny had beat me by a split second with her post.
  12. speedmaster

    speedmaster Been here awhile

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    Thanks Jmo and Oyabum.

    I will probably order the lighter springs and try them this winter. Its not that big of a deal to swap them out so I will just keep both to see which I like better.
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  13. dirtytroll

    dirtytroll Adventurer

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    I do also feel that the front is a bit on the stiff side. (I already use 5w oil) The only rates from RR seems to be 5,0 and 5,5 Nm. Is it possible to order softer springs from RR or Tractive? Maybe it would feel less stiff if damping was reduced. Is it possible to do something to the shim? Will it help to bleed out air from the forks? I tightened the caps before the legs was remounted to bike. It may be some pressure inside?
  14. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    Hi Dirty' - if you've cycled the forks hard over rough terrain for a prolonged period, then certainly some pressure can build up (which is why the original Rally-Raid preload caps had bleed screw/press valves too of course) - so it's possible that is starting to have an effect; but ultimately you've got to balance the fact that you've got a 200Kg bike with 7" travel, that potentially will quite often have luggage and/or two people on board - so you don't want to go too soft on the springs - this isn't a trials bike after all.

    As long as your sag is somewhere in the 25-30% range at the front, your spring rate ought to be correct for the wide range of conditions you are likely to encounter on a multi-terrain 'adventure' ride, without having to resort to constantly adjusting things.

    As I mentioned above, ultimately we are still talking about a pretty rudimentary fork design of modest travel and overall proportions, and while it has been significantly improved over stock [with the addition of the RR shim vales and damper rod/revived spring rate], is still ultimately going to be limited when you start to compare it to the action provided by more expensive and complex cartridge USD forks for example.

    Jx
  15. 32dgrz

    32dgrz Been here awhile

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  16. dirtytroll

    dirtytroll Adventurer

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    Thanks @JMo (& piglet). Yes its better than stock and I am satisfied with the longer travel (and the better ground clearance). For me its worth it, its just a bit on the stiff side. Its an advantage when doing the fast cornering on paved roads and hard braking. Overall an ok compromise :-)
  17. BDMaha

    BDMaha Mud loving street rider

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    I am in the middle of putting my level 2 Rally Raid suspension together. I have a question about fork fluid. I have read that we are to put in 450ml of fluid. I also have watched Rally Raid's video on the forks which say to add oil to forks until the fluid is 120mm from top of fork tube. To get 120mm fluid level, I have to use 575ml of fluid. What am i doing wrong? Love the kit by the way.
  18. Oyabun

    Oyabun 親分

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    You have to measure fluid level with the forks collapsed, so when the chrome stanchions are bottomed.
    But I'd reread the manual also. I can't remember the exact numbers, but I'd expect the air gap higher than 120mm.
  19. BDMaha

    BDMaha Mud loving street rider

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    The forks collapsed and the spring out?
  20. BDMaha

    BDMaha Mud loving street rider

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    It's with springs out and forks compressed. Thank you for the help. Hope to ride the heck out of this thing this weekend. Fun bike to work on!!