Rally-Raid Products Honda CB500X

Discussion in 'Vendors' started by ktmmitch, Sep 22, 2014.

  1. markinthailand

    markinthailand Long timer

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    @ktmmitch and @JMo (& piglet) what are the specs for the 19” front wheel hubs? I just had the bearings tear up so I need to replace them and rebuild it.
  2. markinthailand

    markinthailand Long timer

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    Here’s the damage.
    6EB4FCEC-F612-4D8F-85BF-B64A6E880642.jpeg E9AC09D0-E743-4767-A729-71306489A01E.jpeg F6CAD5A4-40B3-4EA0-A42B-5DF44A10C367.jpeg 43AB9DED-F8F3-45B7-988F-1F1E9E8145CE.jpeg
  3. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    Hi Mark - looks like you have the earliest front wheel there (like mine) - the bearings for those are the 27mm I/D you'd fit in a KTM EXC etc. - any KTM dealer should have a replacement set in stock.

    The spacers do look pretty badly scored though! Drop John at Rally-Raid an email and see if he can help you with a replacement, although those have long not been in production (see below).

    note. for anyone else reading, the later/2nd generation iteration of the CB wheels (typically from early 2016 onwards) use the stock/OEM size wheel bearings and spacers from the original bike, it was just the first year production which used the oversize 27mm axle bearings.

    Hope that helps...

    Jenny x
  4. 32dgrz

    32dgrz Been here awhile

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    Cold and nasty here today. I found this picture I failed to post earlier this summer.
    Man that was fun



    23D6145F-773C-4027-8F86-37717934F941.jpeg
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  5. NOrrTH

    NOrrTH Adventurer

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    I just picked up a 2016 RR yesterday. Very excited about it as I didn't know these things existed until I saw a used one on my local Honda dealers showroom. It saved me about $8k because now I can get my deposit back on the 790 Adv R I was waiting on and, I think this bike might be even better suited to my wants (although I may be kidding myself) time will tell.

    Couple of questions:

    1. Is there a seat that's less square, possibly even lower, that people like? I've got a 29 or 30" inseam and I can barely tip toe on both feet. Looking at the Seat Concepts site doesn't mention "lower or narrower"

    2. How are people adjusting their preload on the rear shock. The hand adjuster is buried up behind the battery box. I can't even see it. I think you'd have difficulty getting a wrench in there on the spring.

    3. Just a comment but I was excited about the LED head light until I used it for the first time and found it very underwhelming. It just seems dim on low beam.

    4. What is the big plug under the seat by the tool kit?

    Thanks!
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  6. Manray

    Manray Killing Time

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    Welcome to the club:

    1: There is no lower seat but the new 2019 CB500X seat is a bit narrower at the front which helps people with shorter inseams. This 2019 OEM seat is a perfect fit.

    2: The RR remote pre-load adjuster makes changing the preload a breeze.

    3: The LED front headlight is weak. Adjusting the aim by removing the cover under the speedo helps but your best bet is to add a pair of auxiliary led lights. Many to choose from (cheap to expensive). I like Vixion X lights.

    4: The big plug under the seat is one of 2 options plugs (keyed power source). This plug includes a "male" end to attach any accessory (i.e. gps, aux lights etc..). Search "options plug" in the main CB500X thread and you will find all the info you need.
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  7. Twempie

    Twempie Been here awhile

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    When you say “big plug under the seat”, does it look like this? I added an OEM ciggie-lighter “big plug” to supplement a pigtail that I use for a trickle charger.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  8. NOrrTH

    NOrrTH Adventurer

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    No, it's the plug that's inside that open black rubber sock thing on the lower right side of your last pic. I'd like to know more about that socket though
  9. NOrrTH

    NOrrTH Adventurer

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    CB500X RR mysterious plug.jpg

    This guy at the top
  10. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    Hi NOrrTH - that red plug is for the dealer diagnostics tool... as Twempie shows, the opaque plastic one in the centre is the switched (with the ignition) aux feed, fused at 7.5A. There is another aux socket up under the headlight surround next to the right hand front turn signal too. According to the workshop manual, the larger plug in your photo above is the DLC (diagnostics) plug for the ABS (XA models only).

    As for adjusting the preload with the ring - yes, it is tight in there (and especially so on ABS bikes) - if you remove the left hand pillion footrest hanger you can get the TracTive tool in there (don't forget to undo the set-screw first too, it's in it's own threaded hole), but other people suggest using a short screwdriver* (with the tip cut off).

    Personally I wouldn't recommend using any other tool than the proper one unless you're confident the diameter of the shaft is a snug fit in the holes on the adjuster ring, as I've seen a number of ham-fisted people damage the adjuster ring by using the wrong shaped insert and/or forgetting to undo the locking grub-screw first. Also, as you may already be away, it is far easier to adjust the preload if the rear wheel is unweighted - ie. on a jack stand.

    If you don't want to go to the expense of adding the optional hydraulic preload adjuster (as Manray suggests), then the best thing to do is to work out approximately how much preload you need to add or remove based on your weight and the weight of the spring (printed on the coils, in Nmm) and remove the shock and adjust it on the bench - the thread pitch being 1.5mm a full turn as I recall.

    There is more detailed info buried in this thread if you search using 'preload adjustment setting' as key words...

    Hope that helps!

    Jenny x
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  11. NOrrTH

    NOrrTH Adventurer

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    Wow, so incredibly helpful! Thank you. :super
  12. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    No worries - I've edited the post to refer specifically to the plug in your photo above - that is a second DLC socket for the ABS equipped bikes.

    Jx
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  13. markinthailand

    markinthailand Long timer

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    We're having difficulty locating them in Thailand. Is this the correct set? Front Wheel Bearing Kits, Fits: KTM (2003-2019): All Models and Engines (Amazon link)
    JMo (& piglet) likes this.
  14. Oyabun

    Oyabun 親分

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    I don't have mine at hand, but as I remember they are standard 6xxx series bearings. If it doesn't clarified by then, I'll check for you and report back when I get home (in about 10 hrs).
  15. Med.Jeeves

    Med.Jeeves Adventurer Supporter

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    Fork/front end question for the massive RR CB500X community.

    2017 CB500X. Was a leftover with 1 mile on the odo (!!!!) that I picked up in October. Recently completed the LVL 2 upgrade, everything but the wheels, which I'm still waiting on. I park my bike in my shed, which has about a 2" high lip I have to drive over. Hitting that lip, or anything similarly sharp edged, causes a noticeable metal on metal "chink" from the front end. No idea specifically where. Can't reproduce it any other way, not bouncing on the front end, not hard front braking, not potholes, nothing (thought to be fair, I might just not be hearing it on the potholes). I've only put about 30 miles on the conversion so far. Anyone have any ideas?

    I did the conversion myself, but I was a professional auto mechanic for years before switching career fields and I know my way around a shop/garage. Used either RR torque specs or Honda torque specs for everything. Install included the Fatbar and the BB Storm, which I did with the 1" hole reposition on the right side only

    (p.s. Thank you for all the tips JMo and Juan!!!)
  16. Oyabun

    Oyabun 親分

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    Most if not all of the converted bikes do that.
    What fork fluid have you used?
  17. Med.Jeeves

    Med.Jeeves Adventurer Supporter

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    10W Bel-Ray, with the tops of the stanchions level with the top of the RR triple crown, per the written instructions. I measured out 450mL, instead of doing the 120ml from the top of the fork tube, or whatever the measure was in the Adam Mitchinson build video on the RR website.
  18. 32dgrz

    32dgrz Been here awhile

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    I think I have the old bearings for my swap out still in a box if you need bearing part numbers. I think I have a set from KTM new in the box too if you need the part number.. I have the older style like you. I purchased my from a local bearing store. My spacers had some scoring and polished out. If they didn't I was going to have a machinist turn then down at the damaged area. Make a stainless steel sleeve and press it on. Then turn it down to the correct size.
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  19. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    Hi Med.Jeeves - the 10w is wrong... I was speaking to John about this last week. TracTive always developed the CB fork kit and shims using 5w oil, but for some reason, somewhere along the line (quite possible a mix up when the G310GS kit was introduces which does use 10w oil) the CB instructs had 10w put in there too...

    Everyone, including Adam after a recent build he did and reverted to 5w, feels the bike is much better & reactive on 5w oil* - and the instructs will be corrected to the original spec.

    note. The volumes as you've ascertained remain the same, however the '120ml' air-gap is not correct to the volume either - use the volume measurement on the CB forks, and then add a little more oil (+20ml more) if you find you are ultimately blowing through all of the travel towards the end of the stroke.

    *obviously there is nothing to stop you using 7.5w or 10w if that is your personal/circumstances preference for slightly slower damping action, but the baseline ought to be 5w - trust me ;o)

    As for the chink sound - as Oyabun suggests, it is not uncommon for some people to notice that, particularly after the initial install (although it doesn't happen in every example). Trusting that the installation instructions have been followed correctly (and unfortunately it has come to light that for whatever reason, some people have missed out on or other step on occasion - be it the top hat spacer or the OEM bush from the original damper rod being swapped on to the RR rods for example) - do consider that the RR springs are 5" longer than the OEM springs (which use a long plastic tube/spacer that inserts into the top end of the spring), and it's quite likely that during a short sharp hit - such as a kerb or lip you've described - that the spring deflects inside the tube just enough to touch the inside wall of the stanchion momentarily. This is one of the limitations of having what is essentially a free spring inside a conventional fork tube, rather than a more advanced cartridge design.

    Hope that clarifies things!

    Jenny x
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  20. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    Hi Mark - yes, those should do you just fine... as I say, as long as they are designed for the 27mm axles which were used on all their enduro/mx bikes after 2003, they ought to be all the same - although different brands may be of different quality of course.

    Jx
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