Rally-Raid Products Honda CB500X

Discussion in 'Vendors' started by ktmmitch, Sep 22, 2014.

  1. BOGWHEEL

    BOGWHEEL Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2010
    Oddometer:
    30
    Finally all done - just have to flip the ABS rear pulse ring. Rear brake seems useless without ABS.

    Is it true the TKC80 on the front will settle down a bit with a few kms - front screen is humming wildly. But excellent on the dirt. Easily upped the pace on my short local loop by 10 - 15km/h.

    20200615_125432.jpg 20200615_125459.jpg
  2. svo_jon

    svo_jon Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 10, 2019
    Oddometer:
    62
    Location:
    Bend OR
    Can't say it settled down for me because it was not a problem to begin with. I get small vibrations at very slow speeds like under 5 mph but they go right away as speed increases. Did you have the tires balanced?

    Jonathan
    Cruz likes this.
  3. Cruz

    Cruz Lost but laughing.

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    13,136
    Location:
    Northside Brisbane, Qld Australia
    What PSI are you running in the tyres? I don't have any problems either.
    svo_jon likes this.
  4. BOGWHEEL

    BOGWHEEL Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2010
    Oddometer:
    30
    Balanced - yes
    28PSI front and rear.

    Last bike had 21" front. Knobs much smaller. Probably not expecting the big difference.
    Can really feel the extra weight of the back wheel in regards to acceleration. When getting tyres fitted I had the opportunity to compare against a KTM 1090 rim. Wow, KTM way lighter.

    Did some serious single track yesterday, and still can't get over how this is basically a road bike.
  5. svo_jon

    svo_jon Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 10, 2019
    Oddometer:
    62
    Location:
    Bend OR
    Yep, it seems to magically adjust to whatever conditions/terrain you are riding on.
  6. mfitz

    mfitz Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2016
    Oddometer:
    57
    Location:
    CT
    I have a level 1 shock I purchased used and a stiffer spring to swap in, and was looking for some guidance on how to do this. I have the preload loosened so the spring moves easily, but I am not sure how to remove the collar so the spring will come off. Any thoughts?
  7. mcpenner

    mcpenner mcpenner

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2009
    Oddometer:
    584
    Location:
    Alberta
    Because of a tiny invisible economy destroyer I still can't afford the wheels. I feel fortunate to be able to just by rubber. This will have to do for now.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    My first try at real mud and sand. I wouldn't dare these conditions before. The biggest improvement I noticed write away is the ability to change lines and climb out of ruts as well as greater stability on loose gravel. Mud and Sand I have a lot to learn but I got through alright.
    Now I think I will have to play around with air pressure and suspension setting.
  8. bmah

    bmah Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2007
    Oddometer:
    183
    Your bike is too clean.
  9. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    8,995
    Location:
    California
    Looking good there McPenner!

    I wrote a missive on tyres recently on the main CB500X thread, and it's probably worth repeating here for people considering changing their tyres away from OEM...

    "I've written a lot about tyres over the years (and indeed recently on a thread on the CB500X Owners page on Facebook) and what you need to keep in mind, fundamentally, is that your tyres are the ONLY thing that make you stop, go, and steer.

    So whenever looking at changing your tyres to an alternative which might more closely suit your own needs, you need to weigh up what they are going actually offer you, and the corresponding compromise that might entail... put simply, if you want proper grip on loose surfaces and off-road, you need a more open/blocky tread - such as the TKC80 (or Shinko 804/5 for example), and alternatives would also include the Michelin Anakee Wild and Bridgestone AX41 which are both suitably aggressive and offer a marked improvement in off-road grip - while to a greater or lesser extent, still offering good on-road handling and grip too - the TKC80 being the best in that regard.

    If you are looking for a higher mileage [lower wear] capability, then you'll need a more mild tread pattern - often billed these days as a 'trail' or 'adventure' or '70/30' tyre, which have correspondingly more rubber in the centre [contact patch], more shallow and closer spaced grooves, and a typically firmer compound too - something like the 705 you mention above...

    These types of tyre are [usually] constructed from thicker rubber and on a stronger carcass (both helping to prevent punctures) than a traditional road/sport-touring tyre - but be aware they will not offer the same grip characteristics on the dirt as a more open tread, and ironically not quite as good grip for 'spirited' paved riding either, due to their firm (and more often 'budget' compound). Certainly what prompted my missive on the Facebook page recently was the OP who posted a video saying how disappointed he was with the Shinkos in wet paved-road conditions.

    While you would be correct to assume that generally speaking a tyre with thicker 'all terrain' tread is inevitably going to be heavier than the same dimension sport-touring tyre, a further consideration is that you do tend to get what you pay for with tyres - cheaper brands using less refined carcass designs while the [quality and density of the] compound can not only affect grip, but also vary the weight quite considerably too.

    So while you might assume a blocky open tread 'off-road' tyre (such as the TKC80) would be significantly heavier than a more mild tread, the fact there are large gaps between those blocks, plus a more refined compound and carcass can mean they don't weight much more, or indeed often weight less than cheaper more mild 'trail' tread pattern tyres, which have been moulded in a more dense compound or heavier carcass.

    What I'm saying is if rotational weight is a potential issue for you (and really, it shouldn't be), do take time to look at the published weights for the respective tyres - in like-for-like dimensions of course - you are considering, and you might well be surprised - pleasantly or otherwise...

    Ultimately what ought to direct your choice is the correct tread for the application - as I say, tyres are the only thing that make you stop, go, and steer - and that you will inevitably need to trade [outright] grip for longevity, depending on your priority. All tyres eventually wear out, so I'd suggest what is most important is what they offer you while you are actually riding."


    Hope that helps...

    Jenny x


    ps. ask me about oil, that is a much shorter conversation ;o)
  10. radex7

    radex7 Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 26, 2019
    Oddometer:
    22
    Location:
    Willows, CA
    Quick question: are there any vendors in the US that sell RR products? Looks like Giant Loop is not doing it anymore... Thank you!
  11. Herman1

    Herman1 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2013
    Oddometer:
    560
    Location:
    UK
    Please take this as intended to help but most folks see an obstacle such as the mud above barrel up to it, brake and wobble thru it on a closed throttle whilst creating a brown trouser moment. The secret is to identify a hazard early, same as road riding, brake and down gear really early and hope the numpty following does not tail gate you then gently accelerate through hopefully nailing it at the exit point covering the wobblers behind you in dirt.
    svo_jon and mcpenner like this.
  12. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    8,995
    Location:
    California
    Hi Radex - this question crops up from time to time, even though Giant Loop stopped retailing Rally-Raid Products about three years ago now (note. they did continue to offer the option of sourcing the parts and building the bike for you if you wanted, however with most retail enquiries nowadays they will simply direct you to the UK web-shop).

    And in that regard, Rally-Raid sell direct to customers from their UK HQ, with worldwide shipping - in your case to the US, it is usually less than 5 working days if a product is in stock.

    All the info (including PDF fitting instructions) is here on their website: www.rally-raidproduct.co.uk - do note that if you have a 2019-on model CB500X, they have grouped those specific products in their own sub-section with a link button at the top of the main CB500X section.

    Hope that clarifies things!

    Jenny x
    Piscoot, radex7 and 32dgrz like this.
  13. bmah

    bmah Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2007
    Oddometer:
    183
    Jenny, I would be curious to know your experience with mud and the TKC80 vs the Shinko 805. I’ve found the 805 to be pretty sketchy in mud. Thanks.
  14. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    8,995
    Location:
    California
    Hi Bmah - I've not used the Shinko 805s myself - as a self-confessed tyre snob I don't like to use budget brand tyres (that is a whole other post ;o), but those that have used them - @Visualiserent (Blancolirio on YouTube) for example have reported that although superficially similar to the TKC80, the block pattern of the 805 doesn't seem to offer as much lateral stability (ie. on a wet/greasy side slope) off road - so it has a tendency to step out sideways; while the slightly firmer compound also doesn't give the same grip and feedback on the pavement, especially in the wet.

    Don't get me wrong, they do the job for a lot of people, and cost less than the Continentals for sure; but ultimately you are going to have to accept the compromise one brand/tread/compound tyre has over another - and also consider that with tyres particularly, there is a degree of subjectivity - plus ambient temperature, pressure and how worn they are can all play a part too... I know people who love a certain tyre on a certain bike, while others don't feel confident on them at all (on the same bike, or a different bike) - and ultimately all that really matters is if you feel confident on them, on your bike, under the circumstances you like to ride.

    I always say, ultimately tyres are a consumable - and how much enjoyment you derive from them while you're consuming them is always going to end up as a balance between 'performance' and longevity/cost. Personally I want the maximum grip and predictable handling over and above any longevity, which is why I always choose a higher quality/higher performing tyre, and suck up the cost as and when they need replacing.

    In that regard, I find it interesting to consider that it is only ever adventure riders (ok, and commuters perhaps) who are particularly attracted to 'cheap' tyres - you'd never put bargain tyres on your sports-bike would you? - and yet ironically tyre grip and feedback is just as important from an all-terrain tyre as it is on the track. Sure you might be riding many more miles on your ‘adventure’ bike than you do on a typical sports bike you might only take out for a couple of hours on a Sunday, but you still need to ask yourself how much enjoyment (and confidence) you want from your actual saddle-time?

    Hope that helps!

    Jenny x
    appliance57 likes this.
  15. bmah

    bmah Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2007
    Oddometer:
    183
    Thank you for your input. The Shinko’s let go in a hurry in mud, in my experience. I was curious as to how much better the TKC80’s are in mud. My bike went sideways faster than I could react in what I thought was a pretty benign muddy spot and I dropped the bike as a result.
  16. 32dgrz

    32dgrz Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2017
    Oddometer:
    281
    Location:
    Ankeny Iowa
    Here’s my two cents worth. I purchased my bike used with a set of Shinkos in a similar condition to the TKCs currently on my bike. I have no clue the mileage on them. I found them to be horrible in mud in the condition they were in. I changed them out to the recommended TKCs and mind you they were new but it felt like I was Superman with the cape compared to the Shinkos.
    You can see by the picture on the previous page I see some mud and with nearly 2,700 miles on this set they still work well and much better than the memory I have of those Shinkos.
    This set did the Dakota adventure loop,900 miles, for their first miles and haven’t seen many on road miles.
    I’ve researched a lot of tire options. My next set will be TKCs.
    78ABBFC6-F1F3-4438-98C1-F4084E369620.jpeg 1FEA966C-EC9D-4848-BFAC-B43A7DEF7213.jpeg E7EDD9A1-27AC-4F98-85ED-75C1172809B3.jpeg
  17. bmah

    bmah Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2007
    Oddometer:
    183
    Well, it seems that I need to source both a set of TKC80’s AND get fitted for a cape!
    svo_jon likes this.
  18. BOGWHEEL

    BOGWHEEL Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2010
    Oddometer:
    30
    Took a wrong turn on Sunday and passed a sign that said dry weather road only. Red sticky clay.
    If not for the TKC80s, would still be stuck their. Had enough traction, but front guard clogged up and spat me off. Took a couple of clean outs to escape.
  19. mcpenner

    mcpenner mcpenner

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2009
    Oddometer:
    584
    Location:
    Alberta
    My Children got me a camera for Father's Day. Great kids! I went for a ride and talked about what ever came into my head. Here is a little bit of it.
    JMo (& piglet) likes this.
  20. Herman1

    Herman1 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2013
    Oddometer:
    560
    Location:
    UK
    Just to rub it in I got a set of TKCs free and luckily really liked them but I now have the dilemma that when they wear out do I put the part worn MotoZ ones back on (which I have never ridden on) [​IMG]DSC01892 by herman munster, on Flickr