Realistic riding speeds in Central and South America

Discussion in 'Latin America' started by wanderind, Jun 1, 2012.

  1. wanderind

    wanderind kailasv.com

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2007
    Oddometer:
    437
    Location:
    Hornet's Nest
    Thanks, Rodrigo !
    #41
  2. oldgringo

    oldgringo Jacked it all

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2008
    Oddometer:
    149
    Location:
    Lima, Peru
    The Pulsar is a great moto, I'm told that they are bulletproof, as already mentioned there are dealers all over South America. I'm sure performance would suffer on the high passes but overall it would be a great choice.
    The Mavila is Chinese and built by Loncin, it's higher quality and more expensive than a lot of the Chinese motos sold here in Peru. The main dealership in Lima is great, a full service including an oil change is about $30.
    Another good moto sold here is the Honda CTX 200, photo attached.

    [​IMG]
    #42
  3. wanderind

    wanderind kailasv.com

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2007
    Oddometer:
    437
    Location:
    Hornet's Nest
    Here's my estimates of average distance (in kilometers) I am planning for...The chart shows ave.dist per day and ave.dist per riding day...Whattya think? Too much? Reasonable? (I like crunching numbers :evil:evil)

    [​IMG]
    #43
  4. Airhead Wrangler

    Airhead Wrangler Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2008
    Oddometer:
    7,269
    Location:
    Back in Seattle, FINALLY
    My inclination would be to say "don't overthink it". I'd just show up and see what you're comfortable with. That said, all those numbers seem pretty reasonable. I never had any problem doing 200 miles a day in any of those countries when I needed to. Just know ahead that 200 miles in the US is not the same as 200 miles on libres in Mexico or 200 miles of dirt in Peru. I had one day in Bolivia when 80 miles in a whole day was a struggle, but you have to go looking for trouble to get in a situation like that. I've done 400 miles on libres in mexico in a day, but it was not enjoyable. Until you get to Chile or Argentina (or if you don't mind paying for toll roads) I wouldn't plan on more than 200 miles a day in Latin America. While you may very well be able to do more in a day, until you ride the road, you don't know how long it's going to take, so try not to put yourself in a situation where you NEED to do 300. Have a back up plan.
    #44
  5. DiasDePlaya

    DiasDePlaya Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2003
    Oddometer:
    796
    Location:
    Santiago, Chile
    Here in Chile from Arica to La Serena on the Ruta 5 you can ride at 100 km/h, from La Serena to Puerto Montt at 120 km/h.
    With my friends we do ussually 500 km/day riding fast but with very long time to lunch. Is realistic to plan one day from Santiago to Puerto Montt (1000 km).
    #45
  6. wanderind

    wanderind kailasv.com

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2007
    Oddometer:
    437
    Location:
    Hornet's Nest
    I am not overthinking...being a data geek, I like playing with numbers..this is just for fun. Once I get on the road for this trip, I am just going to EXPLORE AND ENJOY, without setting limits, conditions, daily targets and whatever people might do on a rally. My trip is never gonna be a race.
    That said, I do have a constraint on the total amount of time I can be away from home. 'Four months' is the ballpark maximum. Some level of judicious planning will help, I believe. As they say 'planning is the most exciting part of the trip' :clap
    #46
  7. markharf

    markharf Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2008
    Oddometer:
    712
    Location:
    Bellingham, Washington
    "They" are sadly mistaken.

    Mark
    #47
  8. wanderind

    wanderind kailasv.com

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2007
    Oddometer:
    437
    Location:
    Hornet's Nest
    Please help me correct it :D
    #48
  9. markharf

    markharf Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2008
    Oddometer:
    712
    Location:
    Bellingham, Washington
    Ok. The TRIP is the most exciting part of the trip. Riding. Meeting people. Going through great and resounding changes. Absorbing fresh perspectives. Accumulating wisdom. Responding with glee to the inevitable screw-ups (as well as to unpredictable moments of ecstasy).

    Planning isn't even in the running.

    Mark
    #49
  10. Throttlemeister

    Throttlemeister Long timer Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2007
    Oddometer:
    4,488
    Location:
    Okie near Muskogee
    I can vouch for "repairing you bike" is way the hell better than planning:rofl

    Plans will only leave you upset because it didn't go right, better to shoot from the hip in Latin America. I've had a hell of a go just doing what feels right.

    John repairing in Caracas, thankfully much less than what I thought I tore up:lol3

    btw, triple or by all means double your intended/planned miles for Colombia:deal
    #50
  11. bananaman

    bananaman transcontimental

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2007
    Oddometer:
    7,898
    I like being able to twist my throttle and 12 hours later be 1000 miles away. South America is big. It's a great place to do that. I love my R1100GS.
    #51
  12. JDowns

    JDowns Sounds good, let's go!

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2005
    Oddometer:
    3,174
    Location:
    Bassett, NE
    While I like to keep it simple and have a mechanically sound bike and a general direction to head, I understand some people need more than that. I try not to rain on other people's planning parade. Some people really enjoy planning things and looking forward to upcoming rides. For me it is torture sitting around collecting money so I can take off.

    I used to think having an itinerary with destinations in mind was like putting a straightjacket on your riding. Maybe I'm wrong. I am going to try something different next fall. I'm heading south and have been offered places to stay along the way. I've never stayed anywhere other than a flat place next to my bike or a cheap hotel when traveling in Latin America.

    This time I intend to actually plan and visit folks along the way. When I look back, some of my best memories are the great riders I met in my travels. There are some cool folks out there and I intend to take the time to meet more of them.

    I will take more pics and report back what it's like having an itinerary as opposed to wandering aimlessly which is my usual modus operandi. Who knows? Maybe I'll make it past the Darien gap this time. The older I get the further south I make it.

    Best,
    John Downs
    #52
  13. Throttlemeister

    Throttlemeister Long timer Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2007
    Oddometer:
    4,488
    Location:
    Okie near Muskogee

    I know I've had a hell of a lot better 12 hours of riding in a day and covering 100 miles than I ever had covering 1000:deal

    There is a lot more to see than just riding the PanAm right down to the bottom and never getting to ride any other roads. Some are looking for a new notch if that's their thing but they missed a whole lot of South America just covering big miles every day. Riding to Ushuaia is far from 'riding' South America that was just the Pan American Highway, hell Brazil is most of South America and many never even go there, let alone one of the best Adventure riding countries in all SA; Bolivia. I'm not saying there's a right or wrong way but to me it's a huge difference when somebody say's "yeah I rode South America" when they just went down the Pan American Highway to the bottom and joined a "club" imho
    #53
  14. Airhead Wrangler

    Airhead Wrangler Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2008
    Oddometer:
    7,269
    Location:
    Back in Seattle, FINALLY
    Big +1 on that. All the days of "doing miles" on highways just kind of blur together, but years later the days you really remember are the hard fought 80 miles of muddy/sandy/steep/rocky/rainy/ flooded agony kind of riding when your ____ quit working and you had to fix it with a random ____ you found in the bottom of your pannier that you had forgotten you were carrying. Type 2 fun: fun in retrospect. Days that are followed by the best night of sleep you've had in months even though you you're just curled up on the ground wearing your riding gear and maybe even your helmet to keep the mosquitoes off your ears.
    #54
  15. Lone Rider

    Lone Rider Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2002
    Oddometer:
    25,130
    Location:
    out and about
    I agree.

    It's an abrupt , in-your-face, roaring current of serendipity, only waiting for you to open the valve

    Crack it open a tad, and see what you think about it....:D
    #55
  16. Strave19

    Strave19 n00b savant

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2011
    Oddometer:
    77
    Location:
    WA
    Poetry! :freaky
    #56
  17. bananaman

    bananaman transcontimental

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2007
    Oddometer:
    7,898

    I have two kids in school. I didn't have 2 years, or even 6 months. And I have zero regrets. I rode exactly the way I wanted to, and if I ever get to do it again, I'll do it the same way. For me, it's the ride, not the stopping. I love the next curve, the next hill, the next storm, the next "next." I can not sit still or stay in one place. Three days in one place drives me fucking crazy.

    I almost rode my RS to Panama. I rode it to Tampico. If I'd not had it overloaded, I'd have made it. A buddy of mine just got himself a K1200S. I'd ride THAT bike to Panama, and then Ushuaia.
    #57
  18. Throttlemeister

    Throttlemeister Long timer Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2007
    Oddometer:
    4,488
    Location:
    Okie near Muskogee
    Like I said
    Quote:
    <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=4 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD class=alt2 style="BORDER-RIGHT: 1px inset; BORDER-TOP: 1px inset; BORDER-LEFT: 1px inset; BORDER-BOTTOM: 1px inset">I'm not saying there is a right or wrong way </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
    just saying a person misses the majority of riding South America when they only ride the Pan American Highway down to Tierra del Feugo.


    Hey Max you might look into riding Brazil next time,
    I hear it is quite nice and it's really big, surely easy iron butt miles to be made there :lol3
    #58
  19. jimmex

    jimmex Guero con moto Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2003
    Oddometer:
    4,237
    Location:
    West Texas/Rico
    Very lyrical; I like this.:jose
    #59
  20. jimmex

    jimmex Guero con moto Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2003
    Oddometer:
    4,237
    Location:
    West Texas/Rico
    That little Honda reminds me of my childhood.
    #60