REMEMBERANCE DAY - 100 years on.

Discussion in 'Australia' started by Tenerrod, Nov 8, 2018.

  1. Tenerrod

    Tenerrod Make it shiny

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    Remembrance Day has a special significance in 2018.

    Sunday, 11 November 2018 marks the 100th anniversary of the Armistice which ended the First World War (1914–18).

    One hundred years ago, on 11 November 1918, the guns of the Western Front fell silent after four years of continuous warfare. With their armies retreating and close to collapse, German leaders signed an Armistice, bringing to an end the First World War. From the summer of 1918, the five divisions of the Australian Corps had been at the forefront of the allied advance to victory. Beginning with their stunning success at the battle of Hamel in July, they helped to turn the tide of the war at Amiens in August, followed by the capture of Mont St Quentin and Pèronne, and the breaching of German defences at the Hindenburg Line in September. By early October the exhausted Australians were withdrawn from battle. They had achieved a fighting reputation out of proportion to their numbers, but victory had come at a heavy cost. They suffered almost 48,000 casualties during 1918, including more than 12,000 dead.

    In the four years of the war more than 330,000 Australians had served overseas, and more than 60,000 of them had died. The social effects of these losses cast a long shadow over the postwar decades.

    So next time you're stopped for a pie in a small country town, take a walk over to the cenotaph, and see how many names a writ there upon it. How many of the same surnames. Fathers and sons, brothers and uncles.
    Imagine the town and farms missing all these men, imagine the wives, daughters, sisters and aunties doing their part, keeping the country going.

    Lest We Forget.

    https://www.awm.gov.au/commemoration/remembrance-day
    #1
  2. lentil

    lentil King of the Dad Joke and Senior Status Legume Super Moderator

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  3. Suncoaster

    Suncoaster Been here awhile

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    I will remember two great uncles that paid the ultimate price, one in Shrapnel Gully, Gallipoli, and his brother at Courcelette, the Somme.

    On Sunday 11/11, "They Shall Not Grow Old" will be released at cinemas.

    It's a compilation of WWI film footage that has been restored and colourised.
    Directed by Peter Jackson.
    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt7905466/
    #3
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  4. gavmac

    gavmac Been here awhile

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  5. Rider 101

    Rider 101 Time poor

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    Still in our collective psyche.
    Miserybrook only shows two sessions of "They Shall Not Grow Old" bugger. We are out for brunch ( nephew's birthday ) but alarm is set in phone for 10:59.
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  6. enookway

    enookway Are we having fun yet?

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  7. BOOTLACE

    BOOTLACE Bikie Scum. Supporter

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    Spent ten days touring the Somme in 2010. Overwhelming, to put it mildly...

    The poppy installation at Parly House Canberra is SO fookn impressive. Goodonem.

    Can't seem to find the ABC story from this morning, but truly remarkable. Stunning.
    #7
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  8. flinders_72

    flinders_72 Long timer

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    Not sure how many of you have heard of the 5000 Poppies project but the two ladies that started it are my sister (Lynn) and sister in law (Margaret). I'm very proud of them, as I am of my dad to whom the initial tribute was for, along with Margaret's dad. The project has knitted and crocheted almost a million poppies over the past 5 years and they've installed them in a number of countries but mainly at different venues around Australia.

    https://5000poppies.wordpress.com/

    I just quoted your post to my sister. Thanks :)
    #8
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  9. ToriMish

    ToriMish Long timer

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    I visited the battlefields of Villers Bretonneux and Polygon wood in 2015 . . . where my grandfather (on mum's side) fought in both battles. He took a machine gun round in Polygon Wood (shoulder wound); they patched him up in time for the Battles of Villers Bretonneux.

    I visited these battlegrounds for my mum, who always wanted to visit France and Belgium to see these places where her father fought bravely. She never had a chance, my mum passed in 2011. I hoped dad would make it over with me in 2015 but it wasn't to be. Dad passed in June this year.

    So many lives lost in the Great War. A horrible, horrible thing. Lest we never forget the scale of loss, for Australia and for the other countries involved.

    I was deeply moved by the visits to these battlefields and monuments.

    I sincerely hope that the hegemonic change in the next decade or so is peaceful, but part of me worries that history often repeats . . .

    This is a pic I took of a poppy growing on the outskirts of Polygon Wood :

    DSC_0780.JPG
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  10. vagueout

    vagueout Long timer

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    Been looking at some of the clips from the Peter Jackson doco and likewise about the making of it, really looking forward to seeing it in a cinema to do it full justice. The loss of life in ww1 was staggering, still saddens me on any ride when i see the small monuments in country towns, the impact on families and communities at large back then could not be fully appreciated today.:*sip*
    #10
  11. Gone Troppo

    Gone Troppo Somewhat bemused observer

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    I took the family to the Somme in 2008, to visit the Battlefields where their great-grandfather fought.

    Pozieres-Windmill-Plaque.jpg
    #11
  12. Gone Troppo

    Gone Troppo Somewhat bemused observer

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    The scars of the Great War are still apparent in Australia today. There are many, many streets named after little French and Belgian towns.

    Every Australian family either was directly impacted by the war, or else knew someone who was....
    #12
  13. 3legs

    3legs Real men ride sidecars Supporter

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    Back in early 1979 I was in the Army and had a major motorcycle accident.

    After the initial surgery in a public hospital I was transferred to the local Repat hospital.

    I was placed in a ward with about 10 other people.

    I was the youngest and most of the others were elderly WW1 diggers some of which passed away during the night during my 2 week stay there.

    During those 2 weeks I got to talk to some of those diggers. We never talked about nor did I ask about what they went through during the Great War.

    They seemed to be more interested in me and my role in the Army (I was in the Royal Australian Artillery).

    To this day I consider myself to be honoured and privileged to be able to have spent some time with those diggers in their final days on this earth before they met up with their mates that never returned.
    #13
  14. Gone Troppo

    Gone Troppo Somewhat bemused observer

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    My grandfather was in Concord Repat (not battle related, all veterans were sent there for general medical treatment) - I remember visiting him in the late 60s. There was a gigantic cross on the building, from memory. There were poor bastards who had been there all their lives...
    #14
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  15. Gone Troppo

    Gone Troppo Somewhat bemused observer

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    This is very good.


    'Broken from the inside': how four devastating years are still shaping us
    It was a patriotic adventure turned nightmare: more than 60,000 men killed overseas, only two bodies ever returned home. One hundred years on, the scars from World War I linger on Australia's streets and in our psyche.

    By Tony Wright

    9 NOVEMBER 2018

    https://www.smh.com.au/national/bro...01DpUCE-AW4D8agmdfAfoG5fEojMY2JzfOj6BsX-yyFDU
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  16. Gone Troppo

    Gone Troppo Somewhat bemused observer

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    Some more pics of the Windmill site from my trip.

    [​IMG]
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  17. Gone Troppo

    Gone Troppo Somewhat bemused observer

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    [​IMG]
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  18. Gone Troppo

    Gone Troppo Somewhat bemused observer

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    [​IMG]
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  19. Gone Troppo

    Gone Troppo Somewhat bemused observer

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    [​IMG]
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  20. flinders_72

    flinders_72 Long timer

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    Images not working for me.
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