removing a damaged bearing race

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by yokesman, Sep 24, 2019.

  1. yokesman

    yokesman Long timer

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    had a bearing come out in pieces, man wanted 80-90 US $ to remove.
    I have a few tools.
    to start I bought a cheap pilot bearing puller.
    marked the bearing race where I wanted to grind some notches to match the tool foot locations.
    used a dremel with a cutoff wheel.
    starting at the far side of the bearing race walking it toward the nearside where I want the notch to form.
    once the notches start to form , I fitted by grinding the legs on the pilot tool to have a sharp outer edge for maximum grip.
    then ground the length of the foot of fit into the bearing bore without interference. now is in a form of a triangle.
    Once all is at its best, test torqued the tool grip.
    warmed the hub with a propane torch .
    With tension applied on the tool and checked regularly, it will give when the temp is right.
    #1
  2. Richarde1605

    Richarde1605 Long timer

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    If you have a welder, just run a bead of weld on the inside of the bearing shell, this shrinks the shell and most times it will just drop out.
    #2
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  3. MotoChris521

    MotoChris521 expert apprentice

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    Sorry you bought a KTM.
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  4. YesRush

    YesRush Long timer

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    I thought heat expands?
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  5. NJjeff

    NJjeff Long timer

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    When it cools the bearing is drawn inward and becomes loose.
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  6. Richarde1605

    Richarde1605 Long timer

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    It's not the heat, the weld goes on hot, as it cools it contracts. If you run a bead of weld along one side of a straight piece of steel as it cools the steel will bend to the side with the weld. If it is a bearing race it shrinks. It works.
    #6
  7. YesRush

    YesRush Long timer

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    See there, that’s why asked questions .:lol3
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  8. Richarde1605

    Richarde1605 Long timer

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    No problem, some things are counter intuitive. Blind bushes like spigot bushes can be "driven" out by packing grease into it then forcing a close fitting rod into it, the grease tries to get out bringing the bush with it.
    There are no silly questions
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  9. yokesman

    yokesman Long timer

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    my race was about 1/4 inch recessed, heating thru the webs in the hub expands the bearing bore reducing the wear during removal.
    the bead idea wasnt considered to be possi ble by the shop.I havent welded for over a year.
    I documented this as another possibility not to repeat previous methods.
    #9
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  10. Richarde1605

    Richarde1605 Long timer

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    Cool, I was just mentioning another method, and it is much easier with a MIG.
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  11. yokesman

    yokesman Long timer

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    If nothing else an additional methods placed here will give the reader the same option I had before coming to this process . So if anyone else has experience with this situation please add it.
    I do want to add that the shop was talking of welding pieces to the race and pressing it out, which i was not agreeable to, besides paying $80-90
    for his experimentation.
    #11
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  12. Richarde1605

    Richarde1605 Long timer

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    Well after he had welded the pieces on, it would have fallen out anyway. Same reason.
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  13. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    I have worked on bikes, cars and HGV's and big mining machinery. The go to method for removing bearing races was as outlined by Ricarde1605.

    Sometimes welding a piece of bar across the race and using that to welt the thing out.

    The various pullers were mostly scattered around the shop, took too long to gather them all up.
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  14. small_e_900

    small_e_900 Amanda carried it

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    I've removed bearing races by welding dozens of times, in aluminum, cast iron , and steel. In a motorcycle wheel bearing, a one inch weld is usually sufficient, but you can go farther if you'd like.

    Welding a piece of flat stock across the race is possible, but I think that I'd have to use TIG to get a decent weld. The set-up time would be a pain. It's a method I'd try if a weld on the inside of the race didn't work, but it's never not worked for me.
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  15. Zuber

    Zuber Zoob Supporter

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    I've welded a bar across a race in a bore. Cut the bar kind of short so you have to weld a gap shut on the ends. When it cools the weld pulls the sides in and often it will just fall out. Otherwise, you have something to beat on and drive it out. I've have a box of large nuts that fit my slide hammer. I've welded those to things too, then slide-hammered them out. Set-up for a MIG is fast. You can hold the piece with plyers.
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  16. LuciferMutt

    LuciferMutt Rides slow bike slow

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    I use wax. Less critical to have a perfect fit on the rod on the ID, and seems to be more tolerant of my stupidity. I've driven out blind bearings this way too.
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  17. Wingboy

    Wingboy Been here awhile

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    Weld! Also removed steering head races this way. Just be sure to remove the ecu if the bike is a fuelie before welding.
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  18. Richarde1605

    Richarde1605 Long timer

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    Soap is another alternative I use if the bush is out of round, I hadn’t considered wax but always have soap it also triples as fuel tank repair...
    So many ways around things if needs be :-)
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  19. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Welding a nut inside - or the head of a bolt. Then you can make like a small slide hammer. But usually the weld on its own is enough.
    3 cheers for a mig. I have only used gas ones, the flux core ones looks spattery.
    #19
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  20. Bounder

    Bounder Typing...

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    I have seen cheap white bread used as a blind bearing remover, much like wax I guess.
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