Repowering a KTM 640 Adventure

Discussion in 'Some Assembly Required' started by Z50R, Oct 19, 2017.

  1. Z50R

    Z50R Not lost yet

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    And the results:

    A tight seam without lumps.

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    And a consistent spacing on the backside.

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    As you might imagine, this is time consuming. I also have other obligations in my life so I did not get too far today. More tomorrow hopefully.
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  2. Tanshanomi

    Tanshanomi Your Favorite Uncle Supporter

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    Great job, and mad respect for your skill!

    I, too, do a lot of sewing, and there truly is a really odd gender thing with it...especially with making women's clothes. I had three older sisters, so I came by it very naturally. I made lots of clothes for my MIL when she was alive and she thought having her own custom tailor was awesome.
  3. Z50R

    Z50R Not lost yet

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    The leather stitching is done. Here is a sample of the baseball stitching:

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    And an overview shot of the whole thing:

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    The baseball stitching is not water tight because rather than sandwiching two pieces of leather, the leather is butted side by side and further the stitches pull the leather causing the holes to open up. No amount of wax on the string will address this matter. To prevent the inside of the suede from getting wet i plan to glue a length of waterproof fabric along these seams.
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  4. Z50R

    Z50R Not lost yet

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    I don’t trust any seat cover in the long run to stay waterproof and since the memory foam bicycle seat covers are not waterproof, I don’t want them unprotected from the elements. Further, the seat could use a bit of extra squishy and something to allow the suede to sit flatter around the memory foam inserts. I went to T. J. Maxx and ransacked their fitness section for a closed cell yoga mat. The foam is 3/8 thick and quite pliable and should be waterproof since it’s designed to not become waterlogged in sweat.

    First I cut some “that looks about right” sized pieces.

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    Lots of trimming and beveling

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    More contact cement

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    And stuck in place.
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  5. Z50R

    Z50R Not lost yet

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    To make the suede somewhat water resistant, I needed to back the seams with something. I chose a material that consisted of two layers of cotton sandwiching vinyl with the intent of gluing it in place. I don’t want glue weeping through the stitching holes so I clogged them with more thread. Below is the seam held up to light showing the difference between clogged and unclogged holes.

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    And a closeup of the finished stitching.

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    I marked where I wanted contact cement and had at.

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    When everything was dried and I had test ridden the new foam addition for a few hours, it was time to finish the seat

    I turned two stainless washers on the lathe with two holes instead of one. Two holes were carved through the seat and a hole drilled in the pan. Strings were run through the leather loops, passed through the pan and tied off to the washers to pull the leather into the back of the seat.
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  6. Z50R

    Z50R Not lost yet

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    Lots and lots of fighting, pulling, and stretching and about 20 bad staples for each good one and the seat is done.

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  7. cedric

    cedric Been here awhile

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    Nice work, it's beautiful and fugly at the same time. I'm going to refer to this next time I'm messing with seats. Thanks for sharing.
    Z50R likes this.
  8. sorethumb

    sorethumb Wubba Lubba Dub Dub!

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    I like this. A lot.
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  9. Anthiron

    Anthiron Hell hath no fury like a womans scorn for Sega

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    Just read this start to finish. I love a proper build even though I am guilty of mostly bolt ons.
    You are going to get so much reward from riding this thing and it being exactly what you need it to be.
    Z50R likes this.
  10. Motogasoline

    Motogasoline Been here awhile

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    Great work. Definitely one of a kind.
  11. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Nice concept. I did some of the same* about 30 yr ago when the guzzi seat no longer cut the mustard. I used foamed polystyrene, but the end method and end result was similar. Cheap and easy to shape, repair or replacing bits cut too enthusiastically can be done with PVA/titebond.
    I had the choice of the original cover or one of the "professional" covers as the shape was different but not so much as yours. Also the base is steel and the factory trim clips still work.

    My hometown used to be famous for shoe making. Most of the traditional machines round the world were made there - I saw a documentary on Danner, and they still used them, complained there are no replacements.
    Lots of guys had leather working skills, a guy worked for my dad was a clicker - layout and cutter. He showed me how to make a wallet, banging along the seam to make it flat.
    He used waxed linen thread, stronger, he said.

    * no memory foam/gel pads back then - at least in my bubble of knowledge.
  12. Z50R

    Z50R Not lost yet

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    It is already the favorite of all the bikes I have owned. I got the carburetor sorted with an EMN needle and now the front end goes up when I whack the throttle in first or bang into second. I can get to 55 in third while still pulling hard and it cruses nicely (for a thumper) at 80.

    I think this thread dies here for me. The bike needs minor things. Eventually it will get a neutral sending unit and an s model shift drum so I can have an idiot light on the dash. It needs a new chain guard and other parts like the chain are getting the miles but overall the build is done and I don’t want this to become a maintenance thread. I have been acumulating parts for my next build and will probably start a new thread when I have enough to warrant posting about it.
  13. WilliamArcher

    WilliamArcher Been here awhile

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    You should post a final round of glamour shots.
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  14. Z50R

    Z50R Not lost yet

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    I’ll do that but it’ll be after the trails open for the year so there is something other than my house in the background.
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  15. sasho

    sasho Dual Personality

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    Amazing thread. I enjoyed it start to finish.
    I admire your fab skills.
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  16. Z50R

    Z50R Not lost yet

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    I went trail riding today and pulled a muscle in my back moving a log from the trail. As I was wallowing in pain on the ground looking up at my bike I remembered that there still wasn’t an “all done” shot in the woods.

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    There you have it.
    Honda-50, MotoPolo, cjbiker and 8 others like this.
  17. tobiism

    tobiism Been here awhile

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    Fantastic. :clap
  18. MotoPolo

    MotoPolo So many places, so little time Supporter

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    Well done - you got to get a big satisfaction smile as you ride this!!
  19. Z50R

    Z50R Not lost yet

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    Giant shit eatin’ grins that push the cheeks against the helmet. I took this bike on a ride through Ontario between Calabogie and Bancroft. The carb sucked water and got in the accelerator pump at the first really deep spot. An hour of trail side bike rebuilding and some tow starting got her back in the game. I am going to build a manifold that works like a petcock to close the lower carb vents and overflow hoses for deep crossings to prevent future reoccurrances of the problem. Other than that, she performed outstanding on back to back days and covered 300 miles of dirty remote riding in two days.
    MotoPolo likes this.
  20. Z50R

    Z50R Not lost yet

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    I enjoy traveling on remote, infrequently traveled trails. Often that means water crossings instead of bridges. On previous bikes (DR-650 and 640 Adventure), with a vent line piped to a place above the carburetor, the height of the air-box inlet was the limiting factor for how deep the bike could run. The DRZ400 has a much lower carburetor and I was limited to about knee deep before water entered the bowl and forward progress stopped. Much thinking and research finds a workable solution but with no part available to buy, I made my own.

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    This is my second gift to the motorcycling community. The first is here:

    https://advrider.com/f/threads/tool-kit-screwdriver-solution.591897/

    I believe this may be a patentable idea and I am choosing not to patent it. I encourage anyone who can use one to make their own and anyone who wants to sell them to do so. The purpose of this device is to allow a motorcycle rider to quickly close all carburetor vents that empty under the motorcycle prior to attempting a deep water crossing. It is a simple manifold with a valve that is fuel safe. In order for this device to work one must plumb all vents and overflow lines to the manifold side and allow the hose on the other side to vent to atmosphere below the bike. Additionally, a vent line must be plumbed in that runs from the carburetor vent to a place above the deepest water that will be crossed so that the carburetor maintains the atmospheric pressure reference on the gas in the bowl.

    The build process:

    I started with a brass 1/4 turn fuel shut off for a lawn mower, purchased from Tractor Supply Company. https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/raider-shut-off-valve-1-4-in?cm_vc=-10005

    I also had a brass pneumatic ram from a paintball gun, 1” throw and 1/2” diameter. This was used because I had plenty of junk rams on hand and it could easily be made into a manifold...get creative.

    I also used three brass wood screws to make nipples. You could buy the nipples or make them out of brass round stock easier.

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    After disassembling the ram for the two brass components, I turned the cap to make it fit over the input nipple on the valve and soldered it in place.

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    The screws were turned into nipples and threaded 10x32 on the back. The ram body was drilled and tapped for the nipples and they are soldered in place.

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    Finally the whole mess is cleaned and assembled.

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