Reprogramming TPM?

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by Taylorro, Jul 13, 2019.

  1. Taylorro

    Taylorro n00b

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    Does anyone know how to program a different set of TPM to a bike. If I trade wheels with someone and get their TPM, is it difficult to mate those different ones with my bike? Thanks for any assistance.
    Rob
    #1
  2. TurkeyRun

    TurkeyRun Been here awhile Supporter

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    I’ve heard (so I’m no authority) this is a dealer computer thing.

    Don’t know if the GS911 can do it.

    I’d be interested in an answer on this too
    #2
  3. NoiZboy

    NoiZboy Dirt to Track and Back Again

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    #3
  4. StevieVVet

    StevieVVet Been here awhile

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    Replaced my rear TP monitor last year with the GS-911. Your bike will support two front and two read TP sensors. So if you swap wheels there isn't any need to due it thru the GS-911 once you set it up. You will need to get the coding numbers off of each tire and input it into your bikes computer. There are numerous tutorials on this on line.

    You do not need a "waking" device for your tires sensors. I think if there is a 4 PSI bleed off of your sensor, they automatically activate. Hope this helps
    #4
  5. NoiZboy

    NoiZboy Dirt to Track and Back Again

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    On number of wheels, that depends on the bike: WC GSs only support one set of wheels. Hexheads support two. Yup - the older bikes have the "better" feature here, sadly. I was disappointed enough to confirm with Bob's BMW, and that is apparently the deal.

    The emergency activation approach (bleeding out sufficient air quickly) did not work for me, but I do talk about it in my post. Hexcode (maker of GS-911) also describes it only as something that might work. Maybe also something to do with the generation of the TPMS hardware, but I don't know for sure.
    #5
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  6. Pch123

    Pch123 Bar Crossings

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    If you have the code numbers from the sensors you are going to replace, you enter the codes through the Gs911.if you dont know the sensors code number ( quite a few have it stamped on them) you will first need a simple code reader.
    It really is easy to replace a sensor
    #6
  7. LAFS

    LAFS Long timer

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    Except for the cost!
    #7
  8. Pch123

    Pch123 Bar Crossings

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    Bought my sensors on Ebay at a third a cost of quoted dealer price
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  9. NoiZboy

    NoiZboy Dirt to Track and Back Again

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    Note with this approach you want the Sensor ID code, not the S/N. Some of the sensors have two bar code stickers with numbers. According to Hexcode, the shorter number is the Sensor ID.
    #9
  10. BMWBOB51

    BMWBOB51 Going slower, but bench race faster :)

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    I had a sensor replace by taking the wheel into the dealer, went home and put the wheel back on and headed to the dealer to activate. TPM activated itself on the way to the dealer!
    #10
  11. NoiZboy

    NoiZboy Dirt to Track and Back Again

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    That's interesting - all I've read says you have to get the controller into "learn" mode and the only way to do that is through software access to the controller. It is definitely true that the wheel spinning at speed turns on the sensor - that's how they work most of the time. I also know when I switch between wheels the bike never "auto recognizes" the non-programmed wheels. I've ridden for days on those wheels and never had that happen.

    What year & type is your bike?
    #11
  12. Lead Wrist

    Lead Wrist More Gelände less Straße

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    This would be partially true - WC does support one set of the wheels at-the-time ie. 2 sets of TPMS can't be stored simultaneously but there's work around it! :deal

    It is true that old Hex/Cam platforms were able to store TPMS for 2 sets of the wheels so once programmed for both sets, swapping wheel sets would be seamless...

    Not all is that difficult for WC either: if swapping one-wheel-at-the-time so there's always one known TPMS being paired with one unknown, the unknown sensor will be recognized within a 1mi or so of riding. A bit of labor involved of introducing one wheel at the time, going out for a ride, coming back once first wheel is recognized then replace second wheel and go around for another ride to get the second wheel recognized too... Other options do include a bit of legwork with GS911 providing that hexa-decimal codes for TPMSs are known... Or, as always, visit to the dealer can take care of it too...
    #12
  13. NoiZboy

    NoiZboy Dirt to Track and Back Again

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    Ah, and that clears up what BMW Bob experienced as well. Seems overly complicated when being able to just keep two sets of wheels programmed was so simple ... oh, wait ... these are BMW's ... silly me. :)

    Thanks for the clarification, LW! That could work well for me insofar as I was thinking of just leaving the TKC on the front and swapping out rears since it's really the rear TKC that takes a beating on road and the front is a little bit more of a hassle to swap out.
    #13
  14. Lead Wrist

    Lead Wrist More Gelände less Straße

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    Yer welcome... :D

    Didn't know that myself as that was what one of the inmates, whose handle I forgot, who brought that fact up - sadly in my case, that was after I went to dealer to have my second set (cast wheels) programmed in... After initial programming at the dealer, I did successfully swapped wheels back-and-forth, one wheel at the time, and can confirm that the "procedure" works ie. theoretically your bike does recognize 2 sets of TPMSs as long as it's one "unknown at the time" that gets introduced... That is, procedure works on my '16 GSA and I'd think that it'd work on previous as well as subsequent Model Years of LC GS/As... :deal

    There was a thread titled something like "Everything you always wanted to know about TPMS..." that had all of the tribulations of what inmates were trying out to get second set of wheels to work on LC platform... :thumb
    #14
  15. BMWBOB51

    BMWBOB51 Going slower, but bench race faster :)

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    Maybe because it was the expensive OEM version? I don't know if the eBay versions are a little diffrent and need the dealer or 911.
    #15
  16. Pch123

    Pch123 Bar Crossings

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    They all need the code entered
    #16
  17. NoiZboy

    NoiZboy Dirt to Track and Back Again

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    See Lead Wrist's explanation above - Post #12. Mystery solved!:clap
    #17
  18. LAFS

    LAFS Long timer

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    Yes even pulling the valve stem would not wake my stock wheel after I took my spare rear wheel of death, running in the wrong direction of the running arrow, ticking time bomb, spare rear wheel.

    I went to NTB tire they brought out a little machine and read the sensors for me, I took a cell phone pic, came home put the GS-911 on it and entered the rear number and bang all was fine. Just write your sensor numbers down in you shop book and all is well.

    I can tell you I removed the factory wheel, put the wheel of death on, and within a block it had found the new TPM and all was well. I expected putting the replaced stock wheel with new tire to behave the same, find it and done. NOPE. It did not pick it up even tough it had picked the wheel of death running against the direction arrow that is going to kill me, right away. The 15 RT would pick up a new wheel very easy and quickly as it would pick up the dark side (real wheel of death) wheel every time no issues.

    I can not believe in this day and age it cant remember but two TPM sensor codes?
    #18
  19. GrusMC

    GrusMC Been here awhile

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    Am yet to replace any on my bike but i have replaced both on my 1290 and did not need any device. That said i have a motoscan odb and it do that when that day comes.
    #19
  20. NoiZboy

    NoiZboy Dirt to Track and Back Again

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    Yeah - I'm also pretty disappointed about the "step backward" from the earlier generation of RDC/TPMS controllers on GS's. Your experience matches mine. Like you nothing was picked up on my bike, even after days of riding, when I reinstalled the original wheels. In my case I reinstalled both wheels, which sounded like was maybe the issue based on posts above. But your experience also suggests the "one wheel at a time" approach is - at best - unreliable and the only sure thing is to take the time to reprogram manually. The plot thickens...

    Either way, that's a good tip on going to a tire shop and asking them to read the codes. I knew the more expensive/pro units both trigger the unit and read the code and other signals, and have to admit that never even occurred to me ... LOL. But I also like being able to just do things at home and the maintenance is just another part of my motorcycling life, so I have a habit of buying tools for doing my own maintenance tasks as long as they aren't outrageously expensive. I also thought I might use the "waking device" on my cars. But running to a local shop is definitely a quick, cheap alternative for something like this! Especially since I of course agree that once you have the codes, you can just type them in and so don't need the waking device.
    #20
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