Restoring look of rashed crashbars

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by texas_aggie, Nov 6, 2019.

  1. texas_aggie

    texas_aggie Been here awhile

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    On a recent foray into Mexico, I managed to rash up one of the Altrider crashbars on my R1200GS. The original finish was what I would describe as "bead blasted" or a "matte" look. The bars are stainless steel. Looking for tips on how to restore the rash back to the original finish (or as close as original as possible). I was thinking of maybe hitting them with a flapper wheel but then they'll be too smooth and shiny I think. Thanks IMG_7344.jpg
    #1
  2. south

    south Been here awhile

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    Sand out (at least the worst of the) scratches, then bead blast back to the "bead blasted" finish; might end up doing both sides just to match, if that's an issue.
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  3. concours

    concours WFO for 47 years

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  4. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

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    I'd file/sand that out, and finish over it. If there are much deeper gouges that I didn't want to keep filing, fill in with some JB weld, and file/sand a little more to have a smooth finish..
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  5. kantuckid

    kantuckid Long timer

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    Depends on whats at hand. It could be a hand file then an abrasive paper of the least aggressive grit possible.
    In my own shop I'd do a flap wheel as the least aggressive removal that follows the shape too, then blast them and re-install. I might use a 2-3" dia 80 then 120 pad then follow with a 3" scrub pad on same tool- which could make a nice dull finish on these if you lacked a blaster. Mfg used either an abrasive flap wheel or beads to make them or they had satin tubing for starters.
    There's bound to be enough metal tubing thickness to avoid use of a filler material? The issue is how you can best remove the nasty.
    That is an area that shows when MC's upright so winters a great time to doll it up.
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  6. Salsa

    Salsa Long timer

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    Nice badge of honor !!!

    Don't touch it.

    Don
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  7. kantuckid

    kantuckid Long timer

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    Said like a true millennial...:rofl all about the "look" ?
    The flip side could be a poor rider who can't stay up,etc..:dunno
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  8. Salsa

    Salsa Long timer

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    Sorry, I'm no millennial. 30 years to old to be the oldest millennial.

    None of my stuff is shiny


    Don
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  9. yokesman

    yokesman Long timer

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    file it, then blend it into the radius, use your fav color paint to match, if ss no need eh?
    #9
  10. Houstrom46

    Houstrom46 Adventurer

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    Not sure how it would ever look undamaged again. These are not superficial scratches; they are gouges that will never be concentric to the rest of the bar without adding material which would be alot of work. I'm not sure that simply matching the texture would mask the damage. If it were me, I would A) Leave as is because there's a story behind every adventure that you can recount, a fishing story of sorts, or B) get a new (or gently used) bar. Trying to fix something like this could turn out looking like something you tried to fix. This has been my experience anyway. Good luck on whatever you decide..
    #10
  11. DonM

    DonM Do-dah Do-dah Supporter

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    It’s your history, embrace it :)
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  12. Beezer

    Beezer Long timer Supporter

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    how about "fuck it" and just ride. belt sander and Krylon... or skip the sander part
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  13. Wentwest

    Wentwest How's that work?

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    If you really, really want it to go away you can sand it down however you want and have both sides powder coated with a color of your choice, in a pebbly finish.
    #13
  14. AZ Pete

    AZ Pete Been here awhile

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    smooth out the damage as outlined above and bead blast or hit them with plastidip spray..
    #14
  15. FTL900

    FTL900 White and nerdy

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    When I bought my FJR1300, it had been a rental bike and was dropped on the right side, scuffing the saddlebag. Rather than repainting it, the owner just shot it with some gray primer.
    Funny thing is, I didn't notice until I took that bag off months later. Because it was on the bottom, it just wasn't visible as gray instead of silver. So gray primer may work well for you too.

    [​IMG]
    #15
  16. JAB

    JAB Unsprung Weight Supporter

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    That's where you weld on the light tabs. Or use rattle can bed liner. Or clear coat to preserve.
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  17. squish

    squish Out of the office.

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    It's stainless, so you can sand the scratches down,
    Start by using a file 90 degrees to the scratch direction,
    Then using sand paper starting at about 400 grit wet or dry, start sanding 90 degrees to the filing directions.
    The idea is to keep doing that until all the scratches you are sanding out are gone, then you use the next grade finer on the sand paper, and sand against the last sanding direction.
    I'd go down to about 800 grit,
    Then I'd take the bars (both sides) into a shop that can media blast the bars. I'm guessing these bars are ball burnished... but a good media blasting shop will know how to get a finish that's close to whats on them.

    They won't look perfect, but they will look much better.

    Or, you could use some spot filler, fill the scratches, sand the tubes back to a round shape.
    Then paint them a bright silver. There are decent rattle can silvers out there, that are easy to work with and last a decent amount of time. Just remember that there are a lot of solids in good silver spray paint so it's a good idea to warm the cans up a little and make sure to shake the heck out of them, I like using towels warmed in a microwave and I'll shake the can for at least 2 mins rotating it in my hand as I'm shaking it to make sure that all the metallic flakes are picked up and are in suspension in the paint.

    Another option is having them powered coated, but then it's harder to repair them when they get scratched again.
    #17
  18. Riteris

    Riteris Dessert Runner

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    I would rather be riding than dealing with something like this.

    But, you might consider wrapping the bars with bicycle handlebar tape and be done with it.
    #18