Rev range when riding - on average

Discussion in 'Parallel World (790/890)' started by TrailTrauma, Oct 16, 2019.

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Average rev range when riding spirited offroad trails/roads

  1. Idle - 4500 RPM

    22.2%
  2. 4500 - 6500 RPM

    66.7%
  3. 6500 - 8500 RPM

    7.4%
  4. 8500 RPM - redline 'cause um batshit cwazy!

    3.7%
  1. TrailTrauma

    TrailTrauma Nemophilist

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    This is a bit vague, but try and think what rev range you like to be in on some spirited riding trail. Pick a range, and detail why you prefer to be in that range most of the time offroad.

    For instance I would likely pick 8K-redline, however the vibes I get as the RPM's rise aren't good for my CTS so I tend to stick around 6-8000RPM (sometimes lower), with my average sticking to 6K. Before I caught on to how the vibes were negatively impacting my riding I was riding at 8000 RPM-redline. IOW's I've simply gone up a gear now to combat pump and also to address my speeds slowly creeping up, as I become more familiar with the bike. 6-8000 I was usually around 75 kmh, and now a gear lower I'm around 95 kmh. I just find it easier all around at this point to run a gear lower, endure fewer vibes and enjoy an easier, faster pace in that gear. (usually 3rd).

    Cheers
    #1
  2. Noyah

    Noyah poser

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    For hooligan_gravel_rallying im up at 8500-redline digging ditches out of corners for whoever comes behind: 95-120km/h, 15/46.
    #2
  3. a.c.e.

    a.c.e. U Mud, Bro?

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    I'd tell 4-7 k - cause that's the range where power/torque is neat
    but good control on wheelspin/grip and able to unload the frontwheel at any time.
    #3
  4. NomorBills

    NomorBills WesternExplorer

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    I don't like to run it under 4 much unless I am just putting. Don't like to run it up high either just for short burst if I am going up thru the gears.
    So I keep it around 5-6500 most of the time. Most fire roads if not to rough are handled at 45-60 mph On long straights that are visible good I have a problem not doing 90mph but WOW I would not want any surprises at that speed.
    #4
  5. Smashy

    Smashy Been here awhile

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    As low as I can without lugging the engine, but I am new to offroad riding. Am I doing it wrong?
    #5
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  6. TrailTrauma

    TrailTrauma Nemophilist

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    I can't tell if you're pulling our leg, or not...
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  7. windblown101

    windblown101 Long timer Supporter

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    Nope. As long as you're not lugging the motor and have as much power as you want on tap at a twist of the throttle you're doing it right. No advantage to spinning up the motor more than needed and or desired.

    Keeping the revs down keeps throttle inputs smoother. High revs have a useful purpose but they aren't the end all be all. You wont see many pros riding around with their motors screaming unless there is a very good reason for it.

    So yeah... just do you. Smooth is fast. Gratuitous wheel sliding and trench digging works better at high rpms and can be good fun, but can be hell on trails and tires.
    #7
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  8. Sfcootz

    Sfcootz fap:hoon Super Moderator Super Supporter

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    I love hearing the engine scream In the twisties. On an unpaved surface I’ll be at lower rpms.
    #8
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  9. SEK_Nick

    SEK_Nick Been here awhile

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    I stay above 4000 for smooth power delivery, between 3k and 4k it can be a little hurkey. I am sure we all know the power pours on at 6k, so when i need the ass it is up around 6 to 7k.
    #9
  10. TrailTrauma

    TrailTrauma Nemophilist

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    There is another approach. I find stability is RPM's. I honed that idea on my HOG believe it or not. When I ride in town, in stop and go traffic I very rarely dab. I can balance at a stop light like a guy on a road bike (pedal) does. And it's all about keeping the engine moving, and feeding power with the clutch by tapping into that spinning engine when an inch forward is required to keep from toppling. So in technical trail it's sometimes quite beneficial to not be just above lugging RPM's. Create a more lively throttle routine, keep those RPM's in a higher area and tap into that easy power by releasing the clutch. Versus almost lugging, and feeding power with a snap of the throttle. By keeping your RPM's in a good range, and feeding off of that you will be a smoother rider through the rough stuff and become quite good at modulating that power. It's a dance between your throttle and clutch, but you reverse the mindset - it's the clutch release when you want to move forward, versus a throttle snap or some combination of both. But you start with that power already being on tap by raising the RPM constantly. If you go to a motorcycle course, and watch if they do a slowest-wins race, you're sees this employed. You should hear more revs than you might expect, but those riders will be the last ones over the finnish line. Also watch trials riders; they do this sort of thing to the extreme. Or watch videos of enduro guys sailing up waterfalls, and huge rock faces and listen as he goes up. You won't hear the engine. All the energy he needed for that is stored up after he revs sufficiently, and the instant he's about to make that move, you'll hear his throttle shut off, and he modulates power via the clutch to climb. Otherwise he'd break traction and just spin. The better a rider becomes the quieter and more subtle this all sounds. It's quite discouraging watching Chris Birch pivoting here and there, or taking an obstacle course while in a constant wheelie. And everything is soooo damned subtle, it's hard for us mortals to spot, or hear what he's doing clutch & throttle wise.

    YMMV
    #10
  11. braaap!

    braaap! Long timer Supporter

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    Yes in technical terrain, control(s) modulation is key to bike control and controlled, forward movement... as is sight. Picking your line is paramount.
    Revs are really immaterial as a benchmark.
    Like others have said, it's all about matching throttle and clutch to the terrain / situation... Plus the 790 TC and throttle response settings add a whole lot to the equation / possibilities.

    Seat time counts big time. Practicing slow manouevres (sp), balance and control modulation drills are vital to gaining confidence in the snotty stuff. Practice, Practice...

    I'vve seen Toni Bou, up and real close down here a few years back.
    There's a jillion thought calculations going on seconds before an attack. But like you say, lots of revs / noise on the immediate obstacle approach... then almost silence, as traction and momentum launch bike and rider up and over / onto the obstacle - Incredible to watch live.
    Aliens. Chris Birch included :)

    Oh yeah, commitment helps too.
    #11
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  12. chippertheripper

    chippertheripper motorcycle junkie Supporter

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    As they say, hesitation will get you killed; metaphorically, in most cases. of course.
    #12