REVIEWED: 12v mini air pumps\inflators\compressors (need input)

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by HaChayalBoded, Nov 21, 2007.

  1. HaChayalBoded

    HaChayalBoded Brooklyn Bored

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    I'm going through another one of those gear dilemmas. Which 12v mini compressor do I want? So like I usually do, I buy em all, check em all out and sell off the ones I don't like or give em away as gifts.

    I'll be testing the following units, if anyone has any others they can recommend me testing please let me know.

    Airman Sparrow
    Airman Owl Battery powered or 12v (I'll be testing it directly connected to a battery)
    BMW pump from BMW mobility kit
    Campbell Hausfeld RP0500
    Campbell Hausfeld RP0600
    Campbell Hausfeld RP0650
    Slime 40001
    Slime Smart Spair
    Slime something or another :D
    Cycle Pump
    Mystery pump - A friend has one which is about the same size as these others, I'll pick that one up today and get back to you with the make and model.

    I have read the MCN article which tested these pumps but I wanted to test them myself because they left out some information. It would have been nice to know the temperature and or humidity level during the tests. If its hot and humid the pumps don't have to work as hard to reach 35psi, if it's cold and freezing they have to work much harder.

    Another problem, they are human and may have lost a few psi during the install and removal of the air hose, I will address that concern by using a permanently attached hose to the bike and a threaded bard on each pump so I will not lose any air.

    Concern #3 with the MCN review, they tested the pumps kind of weird, first they used the pumps for 3 minutes, released the hose, checked the pressure, then reinstalled the hose and pumped for another 2 minutes and checked the pressure again. Their reasoning was to give the Cycle Pump an edge because it's disclaimer was to not exceed 2-3 minutes for inflation. Well screw that! They also had to gauge the pressure between those cycles so again they probably lost a few psi.

    My test will be to deflate a 180\70-16 tire by removing the valve core. I will then use either an EZ air gauge or professional pistol grip air gauge in line between the pump being tested and the tire. I'll hold a stopwatch side by side the whichever gauge I'm using and time inflation to 35psi and 40psi. (Hope I don't burn out the cycle pump)

    If anyone has any concerns or ideas to be able to put all the pumps on a more equal footing I'd like to hear it. I'm currently just waiting on the two Airman pumps. I'll be picking up the Campbell Hausfeld RP0500 later today and will order the RP0650 later this afternoon.

    I cannot currently source the RP0600, it seemed to have simply been an RP0500 with the addition of a built in gauge. But according to Dehager's post the specs are differing. He goes on to say

    "Campbell Hausfeld RP060000DA
    Specs:
    12VDC, 15A
    5.5" x 5.0" x 2.5"
    Internally mounted gauge, max 200psi

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Very close to the RP0500 but it has a gauge...
    12VDC
    5.7" x 6.5" x 3.3"
    Max 120psi, no gauge

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...&s=hi&v=glance"

    I dig the size of the RP0600, on paper it seems like a nice size.

    I have also seen dozens of other slime branded pumps that look to be pretty much the same size as most of these pumps, but I will not be picking them all up.

    They include the
    Slime Smart Spair
    Slime 40003
    Slime COMP04

    Any and all input is welcome.

    I would also be interested in testing the Motopump but I don't think I know anyone local who has one. Maybe I'll put it out there
    #1
  2. cmack

    cmack Been here awhile

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    Try Walmart for the CH compressor with the guage. That's where I got mine about a year and a half ago. I'm not sure if it's the same part #, but I gutted it, and it's tiny but works VERY well. I used a small PVC tube (about the size of a toilet paper cardboard tube) and a couple of screws to secure/protect the internals and the guage is still visible. It fits in a waterproof bag inside my welding rod tool tube with plenty of room to spare for tools.
    #2
  3. PunkinHead

    PunkinHead Moobless Adventurer Super Supporter

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    Does it really matter how fast the pump reaches the desired pressure? If I just plugged a tire on the roadside all I care about is that it's capable of getting the pressure back to 35 psi or so. 2, 4, or 6 minutes doesn't seem important. If I were in the market for a new pump I'd be much more interested in other features:
    • cord/hose length
    • battery connection options (BMW plug, battery tender style plug, clips)
    • overall size (for packing)
    • optional nozzles for pumping up air mattresses, etc.
    I'd consider all of those plus cost before I'd worry about speed.
    #3
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  4. worldrider555

    worldrider555 Been here awhile

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    i bought one of the cheaper cambell hausfields. It was around 12 dollars at walmart, it seems go pretty quick and only takes a few minutes to fill up a tire. It came with an accesory plug for an outlet so i just cut it off and put alligator clips on it.
    #4
  5. toolfan

    toolfan Broken Hearted

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    +1 Seems like a lot of effort. All I really want an emergency pump to do is get me 15 or 20 psi so I can make it to a gas station. And fit in my kit.
    #5
  6. bmwktmbill

    bmwktmbill Traveler

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    Every Christmas another tire pump thread.
    Easier to use the search button.
    The good guys lost....
    b.
    #6
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  7. HaChayalBoded

    HaChayalBoded Brooklyn Bored

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    I did use the search button, I wanted to test them myself, still waiting on 3 pumps in the mail.

    So far I did find out that the Slime takes the most juice to run, I was able to run every pump here off a PC power supply except for the slime, it kept tripping the overload shutoff. I think the test PSU I have in the garage is 24 amp, the one I was using here at the house was only 5 or 7 amp.
    #7
  8. Motopumps

    Motopumps Long timer Super Supporter

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    I have a MotoPump if you would like to test one! :1drink

    Seriously, I build and sell them...

    What is your testing plan? I make mine out of SLIME and Campbell Hausfeld parts, same as the CyclePump... but not for $100 each...

    Rob

    http://motopumps.com


    #8
  9. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    Wow, and all this time I thought I obsessed over getting the "right" gear too much.

    - Mark
    #9
  10. HaChayalBoded

    HaChayalBoded Brooklyn Bored

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    Hi Rob,
    Sure I wouldn't mind testing yours also. I could hold off a few days for the test, this way all of them are done during the same atmospheric conditions. I'll get back to you with the testing plan, gotta run to court! (I didn't even do anything wrong this time, I swear!)
    #10
  11. NBeener

    NBeener Long timer

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    I didn't read the whole thread, but one question comes to mind: power.

    How will you ensure a constant, equal power supply fuels each unit?

    Can you get ahold of a regulated 12VDC power supply, of adequate amperage capacity, like this guy (just an example):

    http://www.powerstream.com/12-volt.htm

    If not, then you /could/ be introducing a bit of a confounding variable, no?

    Ideally (as I think about it), you'd test off the regulated supply, AND THEN off a bike's power outlet (with the engine running at a constant RPM to prevent the test from chronically discharging the battery).

    Actual amperage draw would be another good thing to know.

    Of course, that presumes that ANY of this stuff is actually "good to know."

    :D
    #11
  12. richc

    richc Long timer

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    I got mine for $9.99 at Walfart.
    #12
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  13. davidpetersen

    davidpetersen BestRest Adventurer

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    MCN wasn't giving the CyclePump "an edge". The reason the CyclePump has a disclaimer against running the unit for more than 2-3 minutes is because of the possibility of unintentional tire overinflation. It inflates quickly so the longer inflation times required of some other pumps isn't necessary.

    The 2-3 minute warning isn't there because of concerns that long term inflation will harm the pump. In testing we've run the CyclePump continuously for more than 30 minutes without failure, filling tire after tire after tire, until the aluminum case was too hot to touch, but it was still pumping. We finally got bored and stopped for lunch.

    Here's the inflation performance figures for a typical CyclePump. Tires off a BMW R1150GS (same as an R12GS):

    CyclePump Inflation Times
    BMW R1100GS

    Front tire 110/80x19
    Minutes PSI
    2 zero to 28
    3 zero to 37.5
    4 zero to 46

    Rear tire 150/70x17
    Minutes PSI

    2 zero to 17.5
    3 zero to 25.5
    4 zero to 31.5
    5 zero to 36.5
    6 zero to 42

    In our testing protocol we deflated the tire between each session. The bike was on the centerstand so the pump wasn't having to lift the weight of the bike, in addition to filling the tire.

    We inflated the tire thru one of our EZAir Gauges, which slightly restricts and slows the inflation process. We drew power from the bike's battery. Because we were running continuous tests, we had a battery charger hooked up to the battery so voltage didn't drop.

    Oh, yeah, the temperature was 68 degrees, the wind was from the SSW at 7 mph, barometric pressure was a steady 29.92, and I was wearing blue jeans and a short sleeve shirt. :lol3

    In your testing you could also examine real world reliability scenarios reported to us by customers. Run over the pump with another bike, drop it from a moving motorcycle, drag it down the road by it's power cord for 3 miles. Then see which one still works.
    #13
  14. NBeener

    NBeener Long timer

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    I have a stupid-sounding question for you, regarding the testing protocol you described:

    The first time you blow up a balloon, by mouth, it's a bitch.

    The second time, it's much easier.

    The third, easier still.

    I imagine it's a logarithmic curve that flattens out rather sharply, but ... whether tubed or tubeless tires are used, how do you account for this?

    The only way I could think of is to conduct the test, say, a dozen times, changing the order (randomizing it) in which each pump is used (which is used 1st, which 2nd, etc.).

    Did you factor this in? Thoughts??
    #14
  15. davidpetersen

    davidpetersen BestRest Adventurer

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    Tires aren't like latex balloons which start out in one shape and are designed to dramatically stretch and enlarge. One factor to consider is the final shape of the baloon. Poodle shapes require more tire pressure than clown shapes, as poodles tend to be wound more tightly than clowns. :rofl

    Tires have a pre-engineered shape that really doesn't change much from the mold to the tire. Of course there is some small amount of "ballooning" that occurs as you inflate the tire, but because of the sturdy cords and steel bands, it's not really all that much.

    If you wanted to eliminate any chance that the "ballooning" of the tire would affect the testing results, most scientists use a protocol that inflates and deflates the tire 103 times before starting the tests. Not 101 times, or 102 times, but 103 times exactly. Nothing more, nothing less. Then any stretch would be gone and you'd have an even playing field for all the testees.

    Hey, these are just tire inflators! Not NASA moon rocket inflation modules. :eek1

    Just having some fun..........
    #15
  16. NBeener

    NBeener Long timer

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    Thanks, David. An excellent, and informative answer.

    And, hey, 103 makes PERFECT sense to me.

    I mean ... 102 ... OR 104 ... well, those would be just ridiculous numbers.

    But, clearly, you knew that :D

    So ... to the OP ... you hear that? Hit that bad boy 103 times BEFORE you start logging data.

    Ya got it? :lol3
    #16
  17. HaChayalBoded

    HaChayalBoded Brooklyn Bored

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    David,
    Did you provide them with the pump for the test or did they purchase it on their own? If provided by you, you should have informed them of the above because according to tthe article they mentioned the lack of ventilation just before they mentioned the warning decal on the cycle pump which stressed "INFLATE 2-3 minutes". So the article makes it sound like not running the pump for more than 3 minutes is a safety issue or a warning that the pump may fail.

    When I first pumped up the rear tire on one of my bikes with some of the pumps I have here I had it up on jack stands. I later realized that testing these pumps might be better with the tire on the ground. Not all of us have centerstands. But since most of us HERE do, I think I'll test it both with and without the bike being on a centerstand. Again some ADV input would be great.

    If you want to market the pump towards ADV riders you should have been wearing a 1 peice roadcrafter, otherwise the whole test might be corrupt! Thanx for the temp info though!
    Most of us who can fix our own flat and bikes on our own might be a little smarter than leaving the pump attached to the bikes before taking off. But if I do and scratch the pretty case up can I send it back for a new one? Mind if I run it over with a 40 ton rig? Afterall you say it's military grade, willing to back that up? :D
    #17
  18. HaChayalBoded

    HaChayalBoded Brooklyn Bored

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    Think thats bad? This year I went through maybe 7 or 8 jackets, the same amount of gloves and I think 5 or 6 pairs of boots. This is in the last 8 or so months. Reading reviews of those products is nice, but trying them myself and using them daily is another thing entirely. When I drop money on something, I want it to be good.

    Simple, I want to know not only which is fastest, but which can pump a tire up without overheating itself to the point of uselessness or scolding your hands. I also want to know exactly how much power each draws, Murphy's law say you will only get a flat 500 miles from home, while it's raining and hailing in 10 degree weather. Which is when your battery is at it's weakest.

    It would really suck to have to fix a flat, pump it up and then realize your bike won't start back up.

    Rob, you should charge an extra $10 and mount them in a radioshack or other aluminum project box, for those guys who whine about using an opened up or "cobbled together" pump. (I didn't say that, but there are those who feel this way, but they ride goldwings and harleys)

    Yes I will be a regulated power supply for the tests. I played around with the one in my home recently and noticed all the pumps worked except for the mini slime, which seems to require 20-25 amps to start and then settles back down to 10 amps while in use. The power supply I was using was only good for 10 amps. The one in the shop is good to 30 amps. That one would be closer to that of a good, fully charged bike battery, unless you notice your flat in the morning on a 20 degree day, then your battery will not be providing the amperage required for these pumps to work at 100%.

    I'll test them with 10 amp power supply, 30 amp, 12v small bike battery and fully charged truck battery and see what the differences are.
    #18
  19. HaChayalBoded

    HaChayalBoded Brooklyn Bored

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    Well what your describing is the stretching of the rubber in the balloon, tires do not stretch. With that said, a tire with 10k miles on it would probably inflate easier than one that was brand new. I say this because popping a bead on a new tire is almost always more of a bitch than doing so with a used one.
    #19
  20. davidpetersen

    davidpetersen BestRest Adventurer

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    We provided MCN with a CyclePump for free, at their request. We didn't provide additional operational explanations or disclaimers, beyond the printed label and the instruction manual. There was really no reason to do so, because once you read the manual it explains everything. Maybe MCN didn't read the manual, who knows.

    The manual explains the reason for keeping inflation periods at 2-3 minute intervals is to prevent over-inflation AND to extend service life of the CyclePump. Long inflation periods are hard on any inflator, so keeping them short is good a good thing. Kinda like your engine - yes you can run it at redline, but for maximum life keep it in the midrange.

    The CyclePump's "lack of ventilation" is intentional. There's more than enough ventilation and air flow. The aluminum case acts like a huge heat sink, drawing away and dissipating heat, so we don't need a fan to keep things cool. Extra ventilation holes might allow dirt or grit to get in the case, which is a bad thing for any inflator.

    If you're gonna inflate tires with the bike OFF the centerstand, you'll also be lifting the weight of the bike as you inflate. That makes it harder for the inflator. Make sure you seal the gas tank so there's no fuel evaporation during the testing period, lest any weight change taint your test results. :lol3

    The 1-piece roadcrafter labcoat dress code was abolished shortly before we ran our tests. Blue jeans and t-shirts were found to be more user friendly in the parking lot. (As a concession to ADVrider types, we often answer the phones while wearing an Arai XD).

    Ah, yes, we're all smarter than that, aren't we? but occasionally silly things happen to most of us. Like forgetting to latch our touratech pannier lid, or forgetting to put up/down our kickstand, leaving our sunglasses at the restaurant, etc. All the incidents I mentioned have been reported by customers, but the CyclePump still worked even afterwards.

    Military grade?...Yes
    Fool proof?... No
    So far we haven't come up with a product that will handle intentional acts of destruction. Nor can we make a product which compensates for truly foolish acts on the part of the owner. That being said, we've spent a considerable amount of time and money anticipating typical roadside fauxpaux(s), so we've armored the switch, made the case as indestructible as possible, etc. And should something happen where you actually break a CyclePump, we can usually fix it for a nominal fee. :clap
    #20