Riding after prostate surgery

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Long Gone, Apr 4, 2013.

  1. Long Gone

    Long Gone Objectivist

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    Got the news of the positive biopsies during Easter dinner with friends and family. Nice time to call Doc. I don't fault him really as he let me know as soon as he could and he's very good at what he does.

    Now it looks like surgery is in my future so I'm wondering if anyone who's gone through that would share what their experience was afterward when riding. What helped or didn't and how long was it before you could do any real distance?

    I've been planning on ordering Russell Day Long saddles. Maybe I can get the Doc to write a scrip for them? One can hope.

    BTW, start getting your PSA and prostate examined in your 40s guys. It's not that big a deal and you could be very thankful later.
    #1
  2. No False Enthusiasm

    No False Enthusiasm a quiet adventurer Supporter

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    Most of us who live long enough will develop prostate problems. A significant number will develop malignancies.

    This version of the Airhawk may be of some help...

    http://www.airhawk.net/airhawk-r.aspx

    Good luck with your treatment.

    NFE
    #2
  3. KansasKawboy

    KansasKawboy KK

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    No advice but a good luck wish. I am high risk (Dad and Grandfather both had it) so have been getting checked for 18 years now.

    If you are a Vietnam Vet check with the VA, I've heard that Prostate Cancer is on the list of things caused by Agent Orange. You may be due a benefit.
    #3
  4. PT Rider

    PT Rider Been here awhile

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    Here's info about Agent Orange & prostate cancer:
    http://www.publichealth.va.gov/exposures/agentorange/conditions/prostate_cancer.asp

    Discuss the various ways of treating the aggressive prostate cancer with your chancre mechanic. This shows the various treatment options:
    http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/prostate/Patient/page4#Keypoint19

    Pick the options most likely to save your life, then the option that will affect your life after treatment the least, finally the option that relates to riding. For example, if the choice is between natural erections or getting back to riding a month sooner...hmmm, how long do I get to think about this?

    The PSA testing isn't an easy decision. It detects early cancers, but it also has way too many false positives with the inconvenience, pain, expense, and possible infection from biopsies that show no cancer. The sudden rise in my PSA level showed my aggressive prostate cancer at age 56, though. The cancerous prostate gland was cut out at stage IIb--aggressive but not spread beyond the gland. 11 years later I get annual PSA tests and the level is still undetectable.
    #4
  5. okennon

    okennon Been here awhile

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    Longone,
    I went with Russell day long seat and had them eliminate much of the padding below that sensitive area. I can now ride for hours and no longer experience the discomfort while riding or the after affects due to slight bruising and/or swelling.
    Personal note: take your time...be patient ...it'll happen.
    #5
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  6. Jacl-Kampuchea

    Jacl-Kampuchea Booze Merchant

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    Would it be an invasive surgery or lazer reduction?

    My dad had lazer on his a few years ago, it was benign thankfully.

    He was cranky and sore for a month or so but after that he was back to full action with no lasting ill effects.

    All the best with your recovery.
    #6
  7. OhBoy

    OhBoy Got Out

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    I had surgery Oct 2006.
    Dont remember all the details.
    Your doctor will probably tell to wait until you stop using the catheter.:D
    Remember, do your Kegel exercises!
    I experienced some leaking :eek1 for a few months. The exercises are important.
    Check with your doc, he may say it is OK to start doing them prior to surgery.
    I know I was riding in April of 07.
    Dont have any photos of riding that winter.
    My blood work comes back with 0 PSA now. :clap
    #7
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  8. t6pilot

    t6pilot Been here awhile

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    Long gone,
    You have many options,
    Six years ago I had partial cyro focal freezing, they only froze a portion of the prostate

    Had a tube you know were for three days, day it came out I was fine
    Prostate institute of America Dr Duke Bahn Ventura Ca
    I have sent at least a dozen pilot friends to him ALL have been satisfied with the result

    Don't let some one cut on you without second opinion
    I had three, surgery, radiation, and cryo, chose the later and couldn't be happier

    If you choose surgery
    Please ask these questions
    1 how many do you do a week, some do 5 or six some do one a month
    2 robotic the only why to go if surgery

    Feel free to pm me for more info
    #8
  9. tmm2good

    tmm2good Arvada, CO

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    I had mine removed Jan-11, was riding in the spring, a few months later. Do your PT- Kegals. That was a bugger to get under control, the leakage. But finally got it. My PSA comes back as a 0 now as well.
    #9
  10. OhBoy

    OhBoy Got Out

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    Just remembered a small detail.

    I was allowed two months rehab, no working post surgery. I used all of it. To answer your original question, "how long before you can ride again?" I may have taken a ride or two towards the end of the vacation.
    #10
  11. PT Rider

    PT Rider Been here awhile

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    Why? Do the robotic surgeries actually show superior outcomes, or is the machine more for marketing than for results? As with every type of surgery, the skill and experience of the surgeon is critical. The last thing I read is that the robotic surgery does not have better outcomes on average. Things might have changed in the mean time, but check. Most of us don't buy motorcycles based on the amount of chrome on them, so don't base a surgery decision on the gizmos in the operating room. Only go for the gizmos if there is a real advantage.
    #11
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  12. Long Gone

    Long Gone Objectivist

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    thjis
    Thanks Okennon. I'll take that up with Russell and maybe I can send my seat off for them to work on while recuperating from having my other seat worked on. My understanding now is that after about a month I'll be able to "resume a normal routine including golf". Yikes! That's ALL I'll be up to doing? No offense to golfers but to me it's a waste of a perfectly good shooting range.

    PT Rider said:
    "Pick the options most likely to save your life, then the option that will affect your life after treatment the least, finally the option that relates to riding. For example, if the choice is between natural erections or getting back to riding a month sooner...hmmm, how long do I get to think about this?

    The PSA testing isn't an easy decision. It detects early cancers, but it also has way too many false positives with the inconvenience, pain, expense, and possible infection from biopsies that show no cancer. The sudden rise in my PSA level showed my aggressive prostate cancer at age 56, though. The cancerous prostate gland was cut out at stage IIb--aggressive but not spread beyond the gland. 11 years later I get annual PSA tests and the level is still undetectable."

    I'm at the same stage and aggressiveness, T2B, 4+3 Gleason, and hope to have the same results.

    From what I've read in Dr. Patrick Wash's "Guide to Surviving Prostate Cancer" his nerve-sparing technique that was developed at Johns Hopkins to save the neurovascular bundles on either side of the prostate requires the surgeon to be able to feel for cancer outside of the prostate. That's something they can't do laparascopically with robotics. With a lesser grade I might consider that but the risk of cancer having escaped the gland isn't worth the risk IMO. Others MMV.

    As t6 pilot said it pays to ask about the surgeon's experience. Walsh says to ask for rates of success in preserving potency and continence along with how many does he do in a year. Preferably the surgeon does this particular operation several days a week with totals in the hundreds or is one that's devoted his or her life to doing this one operation. Whatever the process it's the surgeon who makes the decisions and the difference.
    #12
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  13. Bar None

    Bar None Long timer Supporter

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    I had 44 radiation treatments for my prostate cancer and rode a hour and a half each way from Robbinsville to Silva (NC) on my W650 to a lot of the sessions. I went to the gym in Franklin to work out just about every day on the way back to Robbinsville.

    Never had to quit riding but took about a year to get my systems back to normal.

    My PSA test the other day was .65:clap
    #13
  14. Garbln

    Garbln Been here awhile

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    The real advantage of the robotic surgeries is it's less invasive and recovery time is greatly reduced. Recovery is also less painful. As has been said doing the exercises will help you regain your urinary control sooner. I had mine done about 4 yrs ago and am doing very well.

    Good luck with whatever treatment you choose!
    #14
  15. Long Gone

    Long Gone Objectivist

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    Thanks again for all the input. I'm going with the robotic surgery. Apparently the info. I have on the open surgery is from the doctor who developed the procedure and wants to promote it. Advances in robotics make it the choice in my case. There are fewer complications and recovery is quicker. Radiation was an option but not the best one IMO.

    Riding will happen again in time. It's just life as life is the stuff that happens when one has made other plans.:lol3
    #15
  16. Long Gone

    Long Gone Objectivist

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    Three weeks today since the robotic surgery. I'm glad I had surgery as the pathology showed the original staging from the biopsy was too high, the lymph nodes were clear, and there were clear margins on the gland and associated tissues. The result is that I have the best prospect of being cancer-free, only a 5% chance of it recurring. :clap If I had gone with radiation I'd be treated with hormone therapy for a higher risk cancer and have to deal with tissue damage along with a higher risk of recurrence. For me it was the best choice, YMMV due to factors I didn't have to deal with.

    Sitting has been no problem and with six relatively small incisions the healing has been fairly quick so I'm looking at rolling the bike out next week. There's still some swelling in the abdomen so a strenuous ride is not the way to start but I have a Saddlemen seat coming and am anxious to try it out. The center stand won't see any use for a few more weeks as heavy lifting is to be avoided. I think I can live with that. Seat or not I'm going riding!
    #16
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  17. mqo233

    mqo233 Been here awhile

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    I am recovering from robotic surgery, my doctor asked me not to ride for 8 weeks, just to be sure everything heals, I am good with that,

    I am worried about leakage, I started the exercises when we first found out about the cancer, and am doing them now that the surgery is over.

    the surgery just took place, and I want the 8 weeks to be over, but, I will wait,

    I went to four different doctors and all said removal was my best option,

    I wanted to talk to guys on how the recovery turned out and could not find anyone to talk to.

    this is a big thing to me, if anyone has additional advice, please let me know,

    thanks to all

    James
    #17
  18. appliance57

    appliance57 Long timer

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    I had the TURP procedure and after a few weeks of recovery felt ready to ride. So I rode. For me it really changed my life for obvious reasons: I can pee like a pony, and I can ride hours before having to stop. Ahh - the simple things of life.

    Talk to your doctor - follow his/her advice. If you have to wear a maxi pad for a while consider it part of Atgat (or whatever that is). Pride is for suckers.
    #18
  19. Rabble

    Rabble mountain boy

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    I think I have a TURP procedure in my future. Going to try the drugs for another 6 months (Dutasteride & Flomax) but they don't seem to do much. I have to pee 25 to 30 times a day. Good thing I live in the country this wouldn't work at all in the city. I am scared of surgery however, of things going wrong.
    #19
  20. patmo

    patmo Long timer

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    Just saw this thread, so I'm late to the party....

    2 biopsies showed cancer only on the left side, so I opted for Cyo. In my case the left side was frozen and allowed to just disappear/fall away on its own. I still have the right side. Had no symptoms and only had problems for a couple of weeks after the surgery. Was riding short distances of 20-30 miles two weeks after surgery and 1 day after the catheter was removed. Was totally fine with absolutely no problems after a month.
    #20
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