Riding after prostate surgery

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Long Gone, Apr 4, 2013.

  1. canadasax

    canadasax Been here awhile

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    Well here’s an old thread am bringing back to life. I had a radical prostrate operation 3 days ago and I am laying here thinking I will never ride again .
    This thread has done a lot to boost my spirits.
    Thanks for the encouraging posts
    Ken
    #41
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  2. scott123007

    scott123007 Been here awhile

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    Depending on your age, and the quality of the surgery, you might have other problems like incontinence, or having to stick a needle in your dick to get a hard-on, but in a month or two, riding your motorcycle will be a non-issue.
    #42
  3. patmo

    patmo Long timer

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    I never saw this thread....

    Had my surgery 4 years ago at the beginning of March. Mine was done cryogenically....froze the gland and allowed it to be absorbed into the body. Mostly pain free. What hurt the most was having the catheter taken out a week later, and even that wasn’t to bad, just uncomfortable. I was back riding within a month. Have had almost no side effects or problems. Others have not been so fortunate. Everyone is different and it effects each person differently.
    Hope you are one of us lucky ones.
    #43
  4. portalespeanut

    portalespeanut nEARLY nORMAL

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    Update -
    I see this thread's been resurrected and thought I'd update my earlier post... I was 6 months post operative when I posted before...Still doing PSA tests every 6 months and have had low numbers to this point which is good. Impotent still...poor stream still. I've had a cystoscopy three times...the camera up the urethra to look for blockages...ouch.
    While I was back on my bikes quickly, it was a year or so before the tenderness subsided enough to do some aggressive single-track...on the road, much less problem. I really feel pretty good now, despite the side-effects of my surgery, and encourage anyone who's got bad PSA's to get checked out by the best Urologist you can find....skill and experience makes all the difference in your outcome.
    #44
  5. KICKNBACK

    KICKNBACK Old enough to know better young enough not to care

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    As soon as they pull that catheter out sit on that bike of yours, you will ride again and sooner than you think
    #45
  6. JETalmage

    JETalmage Been here awhile

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    Ken,

    Thanks for resurrecting the thread. I may have never seen it otherwise.

    I guess everyone's case can be different, but there seems to be an overall trend. I hope I can add another touch of encouragement. Since you're three days into it, if your recovery is anything like mine, the worst is over.

    It's now been 21 days since the operation for me. I've generally been amazed at how easy the recovery is going.

    There were only two things that I'd call anything approaching "pain" and both were fairly fleeting and really had nothing to do with having had the 'ectomy:

    • Shortly after coming to, I had about 45 minutes or so of involuntary muscle "tremors" in my thighs, which I think was an effect of coming off the general anesthesia.
    • I'm convinced the mattress of the torture device they jokingly refer to as a hospital bed was supplied by the same vendor from which KTM sources its 500EXC seats. Not because I'd had surgery, but because I just don't have much "padding" back there, and I'd been lying on my back for too long.
    Surgery was on a Tuesday morning. I was walking around (slowly) the hospital floor that afternoon. Just spent the one night in the hospital. They had advised me to "work up to" walking 15 minutes three times a day over the next week or so. I was pretty much doing that the next day at home.

    I'm no "tough-it-out pain hero". But I've only taken one of the pain pills throughout. That was before going to bed at home on Wednesday. Even that was not because I really needed it; I was just a little uncomfortable and the wife kind of urged, "Why not?"

    I remember waking up in bed early Thursday morning, after that first night at home and being amazed at how "normal" I felt, and that's been pretty much the story since.

    I wore the cath for 9 days. Even that was not the ordeal I had anticipated. I got pretty handy at just hooking my "handbag" on the nearest drawer pull while dawdling around the house, hiking up and down the driveway, helping with the dishes, etc. Nancy and I decided that there would surely be a market for one decorated to look like a small briefcase, with a pair of handcuffs for the handle, and a nuke symbol on it.

    I do database and graphics work, so had arranged to work from home for a while. I felt fine starting that the Monday after the surgery, two days prior to the post-op visit.

    That also went well. Removal of the cath was quick and easy with just a momentary discomfort (little bit of a sting). Thus liberated, on the way home we even stopped by the motorcycle dealer I frequent, just to see what was new. (That 2019 690 SMC looks great in person!)

    The whole "leaking" thing has also been much less than I feared. Really just amounts to occasional tiny dribbles, and that steadily improving. Seems to happen only when up and about, not during the night.

    The grandkids came down this past weekend. Saturday morning, before they arrived, my other son and I climbed in the Jeep and I drove us out to our wooded property about a half-hour away, to do some target shooting. Spent all morning out there, including some moderately vigorous walking about the hills and gullies. Felt great.

    And I'm still feeling great. No pain; nothing more than a slight tenderness sitting on a hard stool or chair. I'll be following the doctor's advice, but I really don't expect it to be "months" before resuming riding. I figure I'll start on my Trials bike, since I can ride it leisurely in the woods standing on the pegs at pretty much zero risk, and it weighs next to nothing. Then I'll gravitate toward the 500 and 990 as I feel like it.

    Best wishes and prayers for you for a similarly easy and restful recovery.

    JET
    #46
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  7. KICKNBACK

    KICKNBACK Old enough to know better young enough not to care

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    Just keep on doing kegals when you go pee try stopping the flow with a kegal a few times during the day, when your at a red light do them hold them 3-5 seconds before doing the next one get that muscle strong and your drips should go away.
    When you go to lift something heavy kegal hold it then lift then stop your kegal, after awhile you kegal and don’t even realize your doing it. You only have one sphincter muscle holding back your piss that’s on the bladder.
    #47
  8. canadasax

    canadasax Been here awhile

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    Well, the catheter is out , and I am into the “dribble” stage.
    You guys actually have been a big help!
    Thank you
    Any guy over 50 who hasn’t been “checked out”, just do it!
    See you on the road
    #48
  9. KICKNBACK

    KICKNBACK Old enough to know better young enough not to care

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    That first piss after the catheter was removed is a doozy burn/sting lol it all gets better. Keep walking get a cane to help you with getting out of bed out of chairs and off the potty.
    Make one of these to work your junk out hahaha
    58F2CAC8-586C-475A-9EC7-1A985F3DBFB1.jpeg
    #49
  10. georgian cliff

    georgian cliff Adventurer

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    I just had the rezum treatement and can say it made a huge difference to my quality of life.

    Now, ride with pee stops only every few hours, max up once at night and flow rate like when I was 20!

    Painful only a bit, done in the clinic in under and hour, uncomfortable for a few days, back on the bike in 3 weeks.
    #50
  11. KICKNBACK

    KICKNBACK Old enough to know better young enough not to care

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    Isn’t that for hyperplasia basically enlarged prostate? After my prostate was removed and the swelling from all the trauma and catheter went down I went back to normal flow but then I never had problems before surgery as a matter of fact I didn’t even know I had cancer, no symptoms 2 doctors doing the finger wave (my general doctor then urologist once PSA was up) both said everything felt normal it was only because my testosterone was unusually low for my age and they wanted to give me replacement therapy and they did the PSA test is how they found mine.
    #51
  12. georgian cliff

    georgian cliff Adventurer

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    Yes, rezum is for enlarged prostate. All my tests show no cancer - thankfully.
    #52
  13. Emu1500

    Emu1500 Adventurer

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    Did the dance 8 years ago. PSA level has been virtually non existent since the surgery & radiation. I was told not to ride after the prostate surgery for 3 weeks ... but by week 2 was feeling my oats and did a short ride to the store ... back to the doc's and a return to the catheter and a stern lecture on following doctor's orders ... I did ... That was about 150,000 miles ago. I go to the cancer clinic once a year for blood testing and a general "how you doing" talk with the doc ... Life after cancer has been grand. The only draw back ... when I thought I was a goner (PSA was so high ... a 49, figured I was a dead man walking) ... I sure ran the twisties a lot faster than I knew I could. Then the cure took hold and the riding envelope returned :augie... Funny thing, my surgeon asked why I thought I was dead ... I told him that on the internet a 6 or 7 PSA was bad ... I have a 49 ... He said I'm going to write you a prescription for that and handed me said prescription reading "stay off the "F"ing internet" ... still have that one. Oh, one last thing ... during the post opp recovery I had a day bag strapped to the inner leg ... sure could have used that lil sucker during the Avengers movie ... :jack
    #53
  14. eddie bolted

    eddie bolted BOING!!! Supporter

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    Robotic Surgery is Less Invasive.
    #54
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  15. eddie bolted

    eddie bolted BOING!!! Supporter

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    Had mine removed at 50... all is Good... think I was riding 2 months later.
    #55
  16. Meriwether

    Meriwether Following big footprints.

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    It's a sobering thought when the doc advises you that your best chance of survival is to have the sucker cut out. I did that 8 years ago, the best advice I've ever had. I recovered pretty quick and continued to improve over time until a stroke up ended me, that was a much bigger deal. In both cases the best therapy has been riding the bike, at least mentally.
    Keep on keeping on.
    Cheers, Mark
    #56
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  17. canadasax

    canadasax Been here awhile

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    Two and a half weeks and counting !
    #57
  18. CaptCapsize

    CaptCapsize Long timer

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    Diagnosed yesterday. Thanks for the encouraging words.
    #58
  19. Lorretto

    Lorretto City Dweller Crushperado Supporter

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    Capt. - Good luck with whatever treatment path you elect. I went with the robotic removal in 2016 at 60 and no regrets. Mine was caught at the mid to approaching bad stages with Gleason 7s and an 8; so watching was not an option.

    The catheter coming out was a non-event a little weird feeling but no pain.

    I did develop an new awareness of where WCs are just in case. I had a few leakage events, some close calls but no full on pee'd my pants. I consider myself lucky and very grateful to the skill of the surgeon. Riding was not a problem, in fact for me it helped. My mind would tell me I needed to pee just suiting up before even getting on the bike. Got on the bike anyway and my mind would relax to focus on the ride and forget about the pee.

    As I am sure you already figured out the potential for incontinence is real. The other big issue is potential for impotence. I think most MDs now do try to save as much of the nerve bundles as possible. If the cancer is caught early before hitting the edges of the prostate gland the better the chances of keeping full function. In my case the numbers were actually worse than what the biopsy told so getting it cut out was the right choice for me.

    Hope you get the same or better results - still cancer free and 0.0s on the PSA.
    #59
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  20. canadasax

    canadasax Been here awhile

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    I’m going to get a bumper sticker that says
    “Incontinence is pissing me off”
    Only those who are going through it or have gone through it will get it.
    I am on week 10 since my prostate removal and every day is getting a little better
    ✔️
    #60