Riding to History in Virginia

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Day Trippin'' started by The Virginian, Feb 5, 2019.

  1. The Virginian

    The Virginian Long timer Supporter

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    PA memorial off to the right.
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    Unknown civil war soldiers buried 2 to 5 at a time with a number on top of the tombstone depicts how many are buried in that grave. Lots of blood spilled in Culpeper...
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    May god rest their souls in peace.

    Eric
  2. DCrider

    DCrider Live from THE Hill

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    thx VA, I always bypass Culpeper so didn't know it had much of a historic downtown nor the cemetery, will have to check them out.
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  3. The Virginian

    The Virginian Long timer Supporter

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    What a joy to read that someone enjoyed my meanderings and weaksauce photos! Thanks for that. Michael lives in Key West, FL. Thanks for reading and commenting.

    Eric
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  4. The Virginian

    The Virginian Long timer Supporter

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    I'm glad you enjoyed it and there are many good places to eat if passing through. I live about 45 mins from Culpeper at Lake Anna and you're welcome to come by if in the area.

    Eric
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  5. The Virginian

    The Virginian Long timer Supporter

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    Ned,

    Thank you! I don't know how I got that info but I have corrected the post. PM sent as well.

    V/r,

    Eric
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  6. ssgmiddleton

    ssgmiddleton Adventurer

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    That’s a neat little spot about a half mile from my house. I’m going to have to go see some of the places you’ve listed.
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  7. B10Dave

    B10Dave Long timer

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    Thanks for the pictures and continuing history lessons Eric. I enjoy your reports very much. But; don't you think your plate on the scooter is a bit "presumptuous". HaHa; Sea Monster indeed. LOL.
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  8. The Virginian

    The Virginian Long timer Supporter

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    :rofl
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  9. The Virginian

    The Virginian Long timer Supporter

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    Cuckoo
    Yes, Cuckoo, VA

    Today's ride was to check out a tiny town in Virginia, Cuckoo, VA...

    I grabbed a few scooter tags along the way.
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    Pics along the way.
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    I love this old barn with the brow above it.
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    Cuckoo is a small unincorporated community in Louisa County, Virginia, United States. It is located about eight miles southeast of Louisa, roughly between Charlottesville and Richmond. The Cuckoo Tavern stood nearby, which in 1781 was the beginning of Jack Jouett's ride to warn the Colonists of the arrival of Banastre Tarleton's British cavalry (similar to Paul Revere's Ride). There was also a large house named Cuckoo built in 1819 for Henry Pendleton on the former property of William Overton Callis. A historical marker is at the spot. Its post office has been closed.

    The tavern was named for the cuckoo clock on the wall, supposedly one of the first in Virginia.

    George Jackson, the father of Shirley Ann Jackson, American nuclear physicist and President of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, was a native of Cuckoo.

    Jack Jouett - deserves to be remembered for his historic ride much like Paul Revere's. imo

    John Jouett Jr.
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    The only known depiction of Jack Jouett made while he was living, a silhouette by his son, Matthew
    Member of the Virginia House of Delegates
    from the Lincoln County district
    In office

    October 16, 1786 – july 15, 1787
    Serving with Benjamin Logan
    Preceded by John Edwards
    Succeeded by Baker Ewing
    Member of the Virginia House of Delegates
    from the Mercer County district
    In office

    October 15, 1787 – June 22, 1788
    Serving with William McDowell
    Preceded by N/A
    Succeeded by Samuel Taylor
    Member of the Virginia House of Delegates
    from the Mercer County district
    In office

    October 18, 1790 – October 16, 1791
    Serving with Anthony Crockett
    Preceded by Samuel Taylor
    Succeeded by Samuel Taylor
    Member of the Kentucky House of Representatives
    from the Mercer County district
    In office

    1792–1792
    Member of the Kentucky House of Representatives
    from the Woodford County district
    In office

    1795–1797
    Personal details
    Born
    December 7, 1754
    Albemarle County, Virginia
    Died March 1, 1822 (aged 67)
    Bath County, Kentucky
    Resting place Bath County, Kentucky
    Nationality American
    Occupation farmer, officer, politician
    Military service
    Allegiance
    [​IMG] United States of America
    Years of service 1775–1780
    Rank Major
    Unit 16th Virginia militia
    Battles/wars American Revolutionary War
    John Jouett Jr. (December 7, 1754 – March 1, 1822) was an American farmer and politician in Virginia and Kentucky, but may be best known for his heroic 40-mile (64 km) ride during the American Revolution. Sometimes called the "Paul Revere of the South", Jouett rode to warn Thomas Jefferson, then the outgoing governor of Virginia (and the Virginia legislature who had fled the new state's capitol before electing his successor) that British cavalry had been sent to capture them. After the war, Jouett moved across the Appalachian Mountains to what was then called Kentucky County.[1] He thrice served in the Virginia House of Delegates, first representing Lincoln County and later Mercer County before Kentucky's statehood (which occurred in 1792). Jouett also represented Mercer County at the Danville Separation Convention in 1788. He later served three terms in the Kentucky House of Representatives, first representing Mercer County, then adjoining Woodford County.



    William O. Callis was the son of William Harry Callis and Mary Jane Cosby. He was a childhood friend of Presidents James Madison and James Monroe, was with Washington at Yorktown, and was known to Lafayette, Thomas Jefferson, and Benedict Arnold.

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    I'll let the pictures speak for themselves.
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    Folks, when I read about William O. Callis and the folks he rubbed elbows with.. ground zero for this country. :deal

    Until next time, be safe and peace to all.

    Eric
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  10. The Virginian

    The Virginian Long timer Supporter

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    Today's scooter ride was to visit the grave site of John A. Burke.

    Hidden in the southwest corner of Colonel Burke Silas Park sits a grave site marking the burial place of two early and prominent residents of the town of Burke. Even after years of various vandalism and graffiti, this landmark of local history still stands strong, and with a small secret of its own.

    In 1852, about nine years before the outbreak of the American Civil War, John A. Marshall and his wife, Mary J. Davis Marshall, bought 50 acres of land in what is today the town of Burke, Virginia. The Marshalls played an integral part in the early growth and success of the newly established farming community, known as “Burke’s Station” at that time.

    John Marshall served as the first postmaster of Burke, while also running the Marshall General Store (which was located 100 feet west of the cemetery). He worked as an agent for the Burke Railroad Depot, and as a foreman for Silas Burke, the gentleman whom the community was named after. It’s believed the Marshalls’ residence was located somewhere in the proximity of what is now the intersection of Burke Rd. and Old Burke Lake Rd.

    The 14-foot monument that marks the couple’s burial place features an inverted torch on each of the pillar’s four corners, with a draped urn on top, which is the only piece of the monument visible from Burke Road. At one point, the monument had three separate foot stones beneath it, two of which bore the initials of John and Mary Marshall, while the third was curiously carved with the letters “J.L.B.”

    The Virginia residents would have seen much activity during the Civil War, and according to a local newspaper article, a soldier who was involved in a nearby skirmish in the area crawled all the way up to the Marshalls’ doorstep before dying of his wounds. The couple found the man a short while later but could not identify him or the origins of his uniform—i.e. whether he was part of the Confederate or Union Army. The only form of identification found on the man were the initials “J.L.B.” printed on a sword he was carrying. The Marshalls would end up burying the unknown soldier in their family cemetery.

    As the community of Burke grew in the 1970s and ’80s, the gravesite began to see much more foot traffic, but with that came many incidents of vandalism. The gravestone was heavily graffitied and vandalized to the point that the urn on top was broken off. In 1988, the site was restored with the help of Ann Brown (a local descendant of the Marshalls), the Burke Historical Society, and the Burke Manor Civic Association. A chain link fence was erected around the gravestone to prevent further damage.

    Nevertheless, in 2008 the gravestone was again heavily vandalized, graffitied, and trashed. These new incidents led to the creation of the Fairfax County Cemetery Preservation Association, whose volunteers cleaned up the site. Unfortunately, as of 2019 the monument is again covered with graffiti and awaits another restoration project.

    About 30 miles west of Burke is a small town named Marshall, VA, from the same family.

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    I got rained on all day but here's a pic starting off. I have no pics of my scoot there as i had to park far away.
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  11. Kayak Dancer

    Kayak Dancer Been here awhile

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    Just now caught your thread and your address. I often stop at Lake Anna for lunch on my way south to visit my Son and his family in Glen Allen. Nice place and thanks for the effort you put into it.
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  12. The Virginian

    The Virginian Long timer Supporter

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    I assume you have a kayak and please reach out to me if you want to paddle Lake Anna as I live on the lake. Many thanks for the kinds words that someone appreciates my posts.

    Eric
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  13. B10Dave

    B10Dave Long timer

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    Really like that all your rides are history lessons Eric. You live in a great area for that for sure.
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  14. Kayak Dancer

    Kayak Dancer Been here awhile

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    I do have a kayak and I will certainly keep that in mind. Are the Lake and the Marina restaurant open?
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  15. The Virginian

    The Virginian Long timer Supporter

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    The lake is open an boaters are out in full force. The restaurants are still take out only.
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  16. The Virginian

    The Virginian Long timer Supporter

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    Elizabeth Furnace

    Believe it or not today's meanderings centers around this rock.
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    I ventured out to Elizabeth Furnace located in the George Washington National Forest. First a bit about Elizabeth Furnace...

    Elizabeth Furnace was a blast furnace in the Shenandoah Valley that was used to create pig iron from 1836 to 1888 using Passage Creek for water power. Iron ore was mined nearby, purified in the furnace, and then pig iron was transported over the Massanutten Mountain to the South Fork of the Shenandoah River for forging in Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. The road used to transport this iron is still used today by hikers climbing to the top of the Massanutten Mountain via the Massanutten Trail. Much of the original stone structure still exists, as well as a restored cabin, and an outdoor recreation area.

    Why is pig iron called pig iron?
    The name ''pig iron'' originated in the early days of iron-ore reduction when the total output of the blast furnace was sand cast into ''pigs'' —a mass of iron roughly resembling the shape of a reclining pig. The oldest method of pig casting in sandbeds has been largely superseded by pig casting machines.

    Bottomline, during. the Civil War the south had no real resources for iron as all the good iron in the country came from the north. Damn yankee iron so to speak.

    First stop was at the foot hills of the GW Nat'l Forest. We stopped at a VA fish hatchery (one of the many), they'er responsible for stocking all the streams, lakes and ponds with catfish, panfish, bass, and trout.
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    My partner in crime here is none other then my brother-in-law, the infamous Philbilly. (Phil for short)
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  17. The Virginian

    The Virginian Long timer Supporter

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    A rather odd tombstone next to the fishery.
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    We weaved our way up to the GW Nat'l Forest to find the furnace.
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    We get to the Elizabeth Furnace site and it requires a small hike to see the ruins. Sadly due to the sad state of affairs these days it was blocked off. A few pics of the area...
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    Walking along the trails I'm looking in particular for this type of stone. If you look closely you can see the ore mineral deposits in the stone represented by the orange rustic colorist the stone.
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    I happen upon a tiny toad and he obliged me by letting me take a pic and making his presence global.
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  18. The Virginian

    The Virginian Long timer Supporter

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    Walking close to the non restricted area around Elizabeth Furnace and the very reason why I came up here was to learn about the history of this furnace and to find coke. Coke is a slang term for when they melted the ore deposit stones and all the 'non iron' minerals would float up to the top in liquid form to be scooped/scraped off the molten lava and cast aside. Once the slag cooled it would. become very brittle, almost glass like and either cast in the woods or carried out by wagon.

    And here's my treasure, a small piece of history from my beloved state, coke glass. Now if you google coke glass you won't find this terminology used in this format. This was a local term used by the worker's from the furnace.

    So my quest today revolved around getting piece of coke glass. I get it...I'm a geek about this stuff...
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    A few random pics of my trip back to my sisters.
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    Apologies for a tilted pic, I was snapping pics while riding....
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    I hope you enjoyed this very small piece of history here in Virginia.

    Life is short, enjoy the ride.

    Eric
  19. The Virginian

    The Virginian Long timer Supporter

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  20. Chillis

    Chillis Long timer Supporter

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    The toad pic does it for me. Been an avid toad hunter since the early single digits. Miss looking into the below ground window port things on houses to find them stuck down there.
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