Road Rash...how do you treat it?

Discussion in 'Face Plant' started by 2wxplorr, May 26, 2019.

  1. 2wxplorr

    2wxplorr Been here awhile

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    Thanks for all the info folks. A week and a day in and it's doing super well. I think almost ready to start letting it breath. I've bought some tegaderm but unfortunately it wasn't large enough to cover the wound area so I've been using the saran wrap, Neosporin, and tape, cleaning out the wound twice a day with soap and water. I decided against scrubbing it clean as a nurse friend said it could damage existing tissue, but have cleaning the thin layer of white gunky stuff off with sterile gauze. I've been watching it closely and haven't had any red flare ups and swelling continues to decrease. I have full mobility of my knee with zero pain, except the tape pulling hair.
    #21
  2. shinyribs

    shinyribs Thumpers for life

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    Got me a little case of road rash right now, and another spot of recently healed up road rash. I'll take pavement rash over gravel rash any day!

    It's best to keep the wound moist, in my experience. If you let it dry up and scab over it'll be uncomfortable as hell as it keeps cracking open.

    Get some non stick bandages that will soak up drainage and some antibiotic cream. Be careful with some antibiotics cleaners as they can prevent new skin growth.

    Swap the bandage at least once a day. Flush the wound thoroughly with clear water, let it dry, apply antibiotic cream ( Bacitracin, Neomycin) to the face of the drainage and slap that puppy on there. As long as it's slathered with cream and a baggage that can absorb the drainage you will prevent infection from getting in. Be sure to clean your hands very well ( antiseptic soap) before tending to the wound. When the skin turns to a dull pink you can stop using antibiotic creams since the skin closed. Kept it moist with lotion at that point to keep the new skin from drying out and cracking.

    A covered, moist would will heal quicker than a dry one. Just gotta make sure you scrub wound well at the very beginning, and that can be torture, but it's gotta be done!
    #22
  3. Orthodoc

    Orthodoc Cowboy Supporter

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    Agree
    And a good rule of thumb: “ don’t put something in a wound you wouldn’t put in your eye!”
    #23
  4. 2wxplorr

    2wxplorr Been here awhile

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    #24
  5. BigBaltic

    BigBaltic Adventurer

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    Rather than use stretch wrap, go buy the medical grade stuff that is sanitary and a brethable membrae, I think its called Tegaderm by 3M. I'ts PHENOMENAL stuff. Looks really weird when the stuff heals under it, but it is incredible. I had some road rash from a runnning incident a while ago, part of it was covered by this membrane, the other wasn't. The part covered healed twice as fast. Just leave it on until it needs to come off. It really is waterproof and won't come off on it's own.
    #25
  6. Getdrty

    Getdrty Adventurer

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    After the rash is healed you can use Mederma to help with scarring. My ex did that after she dumped her bike. She also got laser surgery to help with the really bad spots.
    #26
  7. 2wxplorr

    2wxplorr Been here awhile

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    My injury got small enough to use the Tegaderm for my trip this weekend...man that stuff is amazing, sticks so well and so flexible, you barely know it's there. Left if there for my whole 4 day - 1,000 mile trip this weekend and barely any issues. The only thing is that I had another small spot I had to cover with a different bandage and the tape went over the Tegaderm, when I pealed the tape off it took those parts of the Tegaderm as well. I will say that I noticed a slower improvement with the Tegaderm compared to the stretch warp/neosporin method, however hours of contact with my knee pads probably didn't help. Bandages are now off and letting it finish healing, thanks for all the great advice and hopefully this thread helps someone in the future.
    #27
  8. A1R250 bob

    A1R250 bob n00b

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    As a wee lad back in the mid 50's it was possible to introduce cinders into knees and elbows from doing a header on a Schwinn. The nurse was a WWII veteran (her name was Pearl) and used a stiff scrub brush on my exposed hamburger. I remember being told something like be a man about it and all these black specks need to come out or they may take your arm.

    Attached Files:

    #28
  9. ozcruiser

    ozcruiser Been here awhile

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    I learnt after being chased from hospitals by the nurses trying to clean my wounds. My way is to leave it a few days with no cover until it gets a hard blood crusted scab then soak your self in a hot bath with the wound under water for half hour or more until the scab gets soft and milky white. Then grab a clean flannel and wipe the scabs from the wounds it's painful but cleans very well leaving no debris in the wound. Once its clean I just let it scab again until it falls away.
    Trust me Ive had heaps of practice. :-)
    #29
  10. Arbolmano

    Arbolmano Not so Studly

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    Keep it clean. Worth the pain to fully scrub, treat with peroxide. I’ve good luck with the Silver anti bacterial creams.
    Learn to embrace pain. The trick is to not get road rash to start with.
    Tonto
    #30
  11. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Long timer

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    I also like a soft scab, hard ones hurt when you bend. So I tend to keep them covered and moist.

    The likes of some generic antibiotic to keep it soft and reduce infection. Good thing is it's easy to carry a tube with you on a ride.

    When I scrub a wound, I've learned to hit it with gusto instantly. The pain is white-hot for a split second, then it goes basically numb. Scrubbing gently keeps you on the edge of crying the entire time.

    Got turned onto this stuff by a doctor after I'd burned a hole through my hand. Its a surprisingly good healing cream/lotion/whatever: https://dermaidecream.com/ Generally have a tub or two laying around. Not so easy to carry on a ride though.
    #31
  12. HickOnACrick

    HickOnACrick Groovinator

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    Couple thoughts from the mind of an evil scientist (board certified):

    1. Clean the road rash thoroughly as soon as possible. Use a soft-bristle brush of some kind. If you can get your hands on a surgical scrub brush, that is best (the kind the surgeons use to scrub-in before surgery). This is going to be painful, but is absolutely necessary. Sit down in the shower with warm water running over the wound, and scrub as much dirt and debris off as possible using a mild dish soap. Best to do this sitting down in case you pass out from the pain. You will likely have particles of sand/dirt/rock in the wound and these need to be removed. If you decide to use a soft-bristled tooth brush, for the Love of God make sure it is an unused toothbrush! The human mouth is a cesspool of bacteria. Most of these bacteria won't be a problem, but there are others that could lead to a serious infection. If you're in the bush and all you have is a used toothbrush, sterilize it first in boiling water for 10 minutes. You are far less likely to have a problem using the toothbrush to brush your teeth after a wound-cleaning, then using the toothbrush to clean a wound after a tooth brushing.

    2. Avoid iodine, betadine, alcohol, and hydrogen peroxide. All of these will inhibit wound healing (they are unbiased in the type of cells they kill and will not only destroy bacteria, but also your own cells needed for regeneration). You are better off with a mild dish soap than the aforementioned. Mild dish soap like Dawn will also help get oils out of the wound. If you're in the bush, clean (preferably boiled) water will get you by. Add a little salt to the water if available (1/2 tsp per cup).

    3. Keep it moist. Keep it clean. I would not recommend petroleum jelly (Vaseline) as it does not have antibacterial properties. You are better off with some sort of antibiotic ointment like Neosporin or Bacitracin applied to sterile gauze pads. Change the pads (dressing) two or three times per day. If they are stuck to the wound, remove them under warm water (in the shower). Ace-wraps are easier to deal with than tapes in keeping the gauze in place and some tapes will induce an allergic reaction. Ideally one would use a gauze wrap (Kerlix) and replace the wrap with every dressing change. If using Ace wraps, launder them between uses. Ointments are not the same as gels. Gels, especially those containing some type of alcohol base, are absorbed transdermally more than ointments, and the alcohols can have a drying effect on the wound. Application of any type of semi- or non-permeable membrane (like plastic wrap or Tegaderm) is effective, but will prohibit evaporation of sweat (creating a nice steamy environment for bacteria) and increase the transdermal migration of some molecules. Some of those molecules may not be best for your body. Wet-to-dry dressing application is also effective. Wet-to-dry dressings essentially use saline solution, applied to gauze pads placed on the wound, to make the wound wet. Later, when the solution evaporates, the gauze is peeled off and removes dead cells, leaving only viable regenerative cells. This process is repeated throughout the day. Saline solution can be easily made with household items like water, and salt. Sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) can be added to reduce the "sting" but the recipe will require a Google search. It's also important to sterilize (boil) the water for at least 10 minutes before making the solution. Overall, an antibiotic ointment, sterile gauze pads, and a loose wrap is what I would recommend. If in the bush, boiled water, and clean cotton will suffice, but avoid athletic shirts as they harbor oils and bacteria, even when they are "clean".

    4. Pus may not be pus. On a healing wound (especially the edges), there may be a light yellowish-colored border. This is not necessarily pus, but may actually be regenerative cells/tissue necessary for the healing process. Pus is something that can be expressed/squeezed from a wound. It has the color and consistency of vanilla custard - and it will stink. If in the bush, it is important to squeeze that pus out as often as possible as you seek medical attention.

    5. Keep it mobile. If the wound is on a joint, keep it moist and keep it mobile. A dry scab on a joint is not going to heal quickly, nor will it heal well.

    6. Be aware of infection. The signs of an infection are redness, heat, swelling and pain (rubor, calor, tumor and dalor for the Latinophiles). Sure, the wound is going to hurt, but if the undamaged skin is red, swollen, hot and painful, you likely have an infection spreading from the wound to healthy tissue - seek medical attention.

    7. Lastly....all the gear, all the time. No reason to treat road rash if one avoids road rash.
    #32
    dravnx and Orthodoc like this.
  13. HickOnACrick

    HickOnACrick Groovinator

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    With all due respect...a bathtub is not what I would recommend. Think of it this way...look at the water color of a pond vs. a fast-moving stream/river. Which of the two has a green color to the water? When in junior high science class and we were tasked with finding paramecium from water sources, ponds, not rivers were recommended. A bathtub is like a pond - rife with bacteria. Moving water (shower or faucet) is much cleaner than stagnant water.
    #33
  14. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

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    Poking around amazon looking for goodies for the first aid kit I came across special dressings just for road rash. Colloidal something or other under a membrane type things. Some of the colloid transfers to the wound and provides a foundation for new tissue growth. similar to burn dressings.
    #34