Rock Climbers

Discussion in 'Sports' started by GoGoGavin41, Feb 23, 2016.

  1. Emmett

    Emmett Been here awhile Supporter

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    Slightly off-topic, so skip if you're so inclined.......

    OK, so I don't climb anymore, but I spent many years climbing in the Gunks as I lived about 40 minutes away for a dozen+ years, and I've climbed in NH, VT, MA, CT, ME and the Daks, W.VA., Wyoming, NV, Yosemite. I started climbing in the Quincy Quarries before there was sticky rubber. It was a terrific part of my life -and it still is.

    You see once you get through the first few years, the first few leader falls, the first few difficult on-sights, the first few route finding escapades, the first few multi-pitch climbs in rain, and/or snow and find that you're rarely looking at a guide book but simply looking at a cliff and finding your own route and no longer feeling driven to climb at a certain grade and are just climbing for the fun of moving over certain features you've joined a tribe -you've become a climber, and that will never leave you.

    This past October I was on an extended motorcycle trip from New Orleans and I found myself in Joshua Tree looking for a place to camp, but every site was occupied. But I found a site that had a sign that said "happy to share" Turns out that it was a couple who were out there to climb. And the people in the next site to them were also climbers. These two couples, who didn't know each other, adopted this old man. They shared their tent site, and fed me all of my meals; dinner, and breakfast, and they gave me food to take when I left. They both asked for my contact info, and have since reached out to me. Why? Because I was part of their tribe, just like all of you who are reading this, we're part of a tribe, group, subculture, whatever.

    And once in, you're always in. You've got knowledge, or "beta" about things, and stories to tell, and just generally stuff you know that makes you an interesting person to know. And of course the people you meet will have stories for you that will resonate with you and be of interest to you, and they'll also know about new developments in gear or areas, or whatever that will be valuable to you.

    So yeah, you may have stopped climbing, but you're still a climber, because just like the epic rides you have made on your motorcycle, those experiences and what you have learned about yourself, and your friends when things went sideways will always be part of who you are.
    aspad, Bart Jones, mick and 4 others like this.
  2. RichBeBe

    RichBeBe All Hail Seitan!!! Supporter

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    Let me know if you head this way.
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  3. RichBeBe

    RichBeBe All Hail Seitan!!! Supporter

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    So well said
    Emmett likes this.
  4. Bappo

    Bappo Long timer

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    My climbing days were trad and bouldering.

    When I lived in California (Navy),Yosemite almost every time we had days off and if only one day than off to Indian Rocks in Berkeley to thrash bouldering. Many great memories one being running out of water climbing Royal Arches Direct and the joy of finding a tiny trickle of water at the end of the final pitch. Oh and then the instructions to get back down. Go left. If you think you've gone far enough left, you haven't, GO LEFT DON"T DIE!

    After Navy was Idaho and City of Rocks. Again so many great memories. Lots of trips to climb all over the west. I even tried ice climbing but hated it.

    Gave up climbing when my neck disks gave out. Oh and I still have some gear but could never fit into my harness, haha.

    My best friend and climbing partner is now dying from GBM. He grew up climbing with Alex Lowe and friends in Montana. Thankfully we got to go climb some of his old routes in the later years.

    I sure do miss it.
    Bart Jones, mick and 2old2Bbold like this.
  5. mnmlst

    mnmlst mnmlst

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    Location:
    a Pangean remnant
    put a prussic or ascender above with a biner, take the ‘brake’ rope side of the Grigi up and through the biner... slide the prussic high, then pull down on the rope. You get a mechanical advantage on the pull-up because you’re unloading the Grigi simultaneously. You can add a foot loop if you need to, but if your feet can touch the wall you can usually do with out. Not a super efficient way to go up, but it’ll work for a short ascent or pinch.

    442A53F0-0189-4E61-A3D8-718812264125.jpeg
  6. UngaWunga

    UngaWunga Mosquito bait

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    went ice climbing for the first time yesterday. That was fun. Been a while since I've climbed outside, so I did route and anchor cleanup for practice.

    [​IMG]

    Need to sell the Koflach's I have and find a pair that fit me better. They're a little to big, making it hard to drop my heels with the crampons in the ice.
    mick likes this.
  7. maineDave

    maineDave Long timer

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    Lots of boots will be on consignment in N. Conway in a few months if you're willing to wait until then. And you've probably already found mind-boggling quantities of opinion on plastic vs soft-shell/leather. If your main goal is going to be Huntington gullies and winter alpine stuff, a better fit with Degre or Arctis boots would do. But if waterfall ice or anything mixed has your interest (and it should, 'cause it's awesome), try to borrow or rent a pair of LS Nepal Evo GTX or similar (Scarpa Mont Blanc, etc).
    Part of that heel drop difficulty is fit, but lots of it is the ankle material and I could never be as precise or confident in plastic.

    The dilemma is that good hard-shell may be easier to keep your feet warm, so if you want one pair of boots for technical AND alpine, know your foot temp regulation and sock needs first, then fit leather very carefully. A pair of insulated gaiters like MountainTools can bridge the gap a bit.
    I used the Evos almost exclusively, but had a pair of heavier Salomons for colder slogging.

    Have fun, check your knots.
    maineDave
  8. RichBeBe

    RichBeBe All Hail Seitan!!! Supporter

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    I just for back from the Canadian Rockies visiting my fiancee and the ice looks awesome. She leads ice, but is injured so I did not bring gear. What a tease to see some of the lines though.
    I also need some new boots. I have a not so warm pair of Mad Rock boots that do not fit me well, a set of super warm but not good for anything but pure vertical ice plastics. I am going to be looking soon for a pair of warm, technical boots, that fit wide feet and are 100% synthetic. Possibly the Scarpa Ribbelle Tech, but need to try them on first.
    Also for a bit of spam, I posted some softshell jackets and pants in the flea market.
  9. Bart Jones

    Bart Jones BGY 504 Supporter

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    Damn, having just spent the last 30 minutes reading this thread, my palms are sweating like pavlov's dog.

    Trad Rack
    [​IMG]
    Looking Glass
    [​IMG]
    Linville Gorge
    [​IMG]
    Clandestine camp at Linville Gorge jamming to Dylan's newest release "Time Out of Mind" before sipping whisky and hanging with the Bear Hunters all night.
    [​IMG]
    Rapping off the Parking Lot after finishing the Nose or Sundial was always entertaining.
    [​IMG]
  10. haystack

    haystack Just ride

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    Location:
    Jersey Highlands
    Has anyone here ever climbed Devils Tower, Wyoming

    [​IMG]
  11. RichBeBe

    RichBeBe All Hail Seitan!!! Supporter

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    Yes...In 1989 at 20 years-old I went on a five month motorcycle trip. I went to Devils Tower and saw some climbers and thought they were super human. Fast forward 30 years later I started climbing, I then saw that Devils Tower was in my range a few years later and made it a goal. In 2016 I went on a two-month road trip and made sure to climb it.
    I did the Wiessner Route and topped out. Got to be too hot and rapped off and was the only route we did.
    [​IMG]
    Ridge and UngaWunga like this.
  12. OhBoy

    OhBoy Got Out

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    Went to Devils Tower in the 90s. I was traveling solo. They had a system where you had to register to climb routes. No hang out that I could find to meet potential partners. No such thing as hanging out at the base of a climb and hooking up. (that I saw) So, blew it off and climbed elsewhere.

    Damn fine looking cracks!
  13. Ridge

    Ridge Faster than farm equipment. Supporter

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    Is there such a thing as fond memories of being able to climb indoors?

    From my last foray out with the local climbing club... it's difficult to see because her leg at the top of the image is blocking, but there is one tiny blue chip over on that other wall that's really necessary to clean that particular 5.8+ route. I did not make it to the chip in two tries... just not quite enough reach.

    TRC5.8+.JPG
    Mr Head and RichBeBe like this.
  14. UngaWunga

    UngaWunga Mosquito bait

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    I miss hanging out with my climbing buddies once a week at the gym. Was more of an excuse to "train" for an hour or so, and then head over to the bar.
    Ridge likes this.
  15. RichBeBe

    RichBeBe All Hail Seitan!!! Supporter

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    I am staying at my house 10 minutes from the Gunks and teaching remotely. So in theory I could be climbing outside everyday. How sweet would that have been?

    But I decided it was not smart to do, and now they closed the whole preserve for climbing. So I will just sit home and get fatter.
  16. UngaWunga

    UngaWunga Mosquito bait

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    hangboard in the office closet....
    [​IMG]
    Ridge and Bappo like this.
  17. UngaWunga

    UngaWunga Mosquito bait

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    When we were shopping for houses 5 years ago, my priorities were:

    close to the ocean
    decent biking/running trails nearby
    area for a garden in the yard
    garage
    glacier erratic in the yard for climbing

    layout or number of rooms or hardwood floors didn't really matter to much to me. I let the wife worry about that stuff. I got all except that last one.
  18. squish

    squish Out of the office.

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    Where the Ghetto meets the sea.
    Well...
    New to a new city, didn't know anyone. Workmates were all into my main lifestyle (motorcycling, motorcycles)
    No one at the office climbed and this was pre-social media, forums or on line "clubs" like you have today.

    So I joined a rock gym, they had a decent set of free weights, a concept2 Rower and was pretty popular with mid 20 year olds.
    I joined, I worked out I boldered, I started hanging out with people started climbing on the top roped routes. It was a good time and I have fond memories of it.

    It was a different sort of sport from outdoor climbing but it was still fun.
    Ridge likes this.
  19. Colemanfu

    Colemanfu King of all manfu

    Joined:
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    Location:
    DAYTONA USA
    First visit to this side of town. Curious if anyone has been to City of Rocks in Idaho? It's a potential first stop as we enter Idaho this summer (fingers crossed). I like free camping and climbing around on the rocks at camp - no ropes just bouldering. Is there boondocking where you can mess around close to camp, is it super hot in mid June, any don't miss sites in that area?
  20. Bappo

    Bappo Long timer

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    I've been to City of Rocks too many times to count but it's been a few years so some of my knowledge is out of date. June is very nice temps there and start of the very busy season. I do not believe there are any free camping spots in the City and all the good sites are now reservation and mostly booked early (much busier than in my day). BLM boondocking is just a few miles south of the turn off to the City on a dirt road. No rocks or bouldering down there though. We always camped behind Decadent Wall way up at the top of the City. I think they may have changed the name of decadent and the names of the climbs there to appease the sensitive. Most any rock in the City can be bouldered in some manner, usually traverses. The hikes are not to be missed down in the valley. Also don't miss the remnants of the Oregon Trail through the park.

    I miss my climbing days there and the unfettered freedoms before it became super popular. Lot's of great memories.
    Colemanfu likes this.