Rohtang Returned, yet Again - the Triplog!

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by hitanshu, Dec 19, 2006.

  1. hitanshu

    hitanshu Free-Rider

    Joined:
    May 29, 2006
    Oddometer:
    67
    Location:
    Delhi, India
    Prologue: This is a ride in India, basically an update of the original Rohtang Returned ride - I returned, and came back hapier :)

    "There is a tide in the affairs of men, which taken at the flood leads on to fortune..."
    - Shakespeare
    "There is a ride in the affairs of men, which taken at the snow leads on to memories of a lifetime..."
    - Yours untruly

    After the failure of the Rabba ride, there had always been a nagging fear in my heart. A fear of heights, of daring to fly beyond the horizon, and over the passes.

    A fear that was born, when torrential downpours forced me to abandon my Leh dream on 14th August 2006. That evening, when the 'mighty' Pulsar 180 gave up 3km before the Rohtang pass, I was a crushed man. Vanquished by an enemy that I did not know, nor see - I lived in fear, doubt and ridicule. I had lost trust in my steed.

    September and October came and went without any real rides. Some armchair adventures to nearby mudholes, known as Damdama/Badkhal lake followed, but I was thirsting. For some real riding.

    In the meanwhile, the dhaba brigade at Delhi had been bonding together. Mostly BCMT/xbhp/BN boys, we started out with Garhmukteshwar and followed it up with a rocking ride to Pushkar camel fair. Sometime after that ride, I had discussions with my HR manager. She had been clear. I knew that come 2007, I would have to move out of Delhi, and be transferred to Mumbai or Gujarat. On a whim, I rode to Alwar. Solo. To experience Siliserh, and have a chance at seeing tigers in Sariska.

    While Sariska didn't happen, my internal clock had begun to tick.
    Knowing fully well, that the last few weeks would be devoted to family, I knew I had to ride, to conquer my internal demons. Quick.

    I knew that Rohtang had been closed by snowfall, so I couldn't vanquish that old enemy. And the dhaba gang was to ride to Munsyari as well. But there was to be no snow in their route. That settled it.
    Manali it would be, to ride as high as I could, to experience snow, and to conquer my altitude fears by scaling the formidable Jalori pass as well as experience the vistas at Hatu peak.

    The easiest part was getting leaves. It can never be repeated enough that part of being a tourer is having an accomodating office. My boss and seniors are well familiarized with my touring tendencies, and do give me leaves and allow me to work hard in advance to make up. After that, stubborn digging in of heels at home helped. Realizing that yours truly WAS going to the hills come what may, mom also gave in.
    What helped was that, by that time, Chanderjeet was to be a part of the plan. So the team ride bit helped [​IMG]

    Chanderjeet's leaves got cancelled at the last moment. But that was not going to stop me. This time, the planning was relaxed since my 53 item Leh checklist was pruned down to a meager 35 item baby [​IMG]

    28th November

    I reached home a little later than the usual 7, already tensed.
    Thankfully, I had all the items I needed. Slept off only by ten since I packed all my bags in advance. Woke up at 2:45 all set to fly. Took some leisurely time getting ready to move out by 4am.
    Rode at an easy clip to reach Karnal for some tea by 6am. Was moving along peacefully to touch Ambala by 8:45am. Stopped at the BPCL petrol pump to tank up. But the moment I swerved into the pump, the front tank lost pressure. I braked, to realize that it had gone flat. Right in front of a puncturewala. Don't we just love their ilk? [​IMG]

    Anyways, the gent took a loathsome 45 mins and 30 bucks to repair a single puncture. Finally, when replacing the tyre, he managed to unhook a front disk pad. And the moment I took off, and touched the brake - the wheel locked up. Hectic calls to my mech followed, but the puncturewala was unable to release the brake pads. At 10:15, I decided to ride on to Ambala city to find a bajaj mechanic. luckily, Goyal bajaj was close by, and their mechs replaced my brake pads (earlier had done 21k km service and were worn out) in some 10 min. I spent another ten minutes for the operators to enter the order into the computer and raise my bill [​IMG]

    Then, I rode on to the local MRF dealer to purchase a spare tube for the front tyre, since I wanted to keep spare tubes - Jalori is pretty much in wilderness! Carried on amid mad traffic to have lunch and leave Kiratpur by 1:45pm.

    The roads were good, and this time, the bike was peacefully maintaining 50-60 throughout with some reserve power. The stand scraping started just before Bilaspur. P180 DTSi v2 has very low stand clearance, so every other curve, the road was being scraped at every turn. Peg scraping took a lot of control though. I barely did it like three-four times.

    The fun was so good, I was just taking my own time. Stopped over at Pandoh and larji dams to soak in the view. The Pandoh dam looked so good in the evening.
    [​IMG]


    The dual headlamp 95W illumination was enough for me to do Kullu-Manali in 1 hour 15mins despite some 2-3atrocious km near Raison. I finally reached Manali at about 9:30pm with sufficient stops enroute to admire the white snowy peaks in the darkness.

    Now, given that destination was Rohtang, and that GIR team/Ken(?) had posted about staying in Vasisht, I rode on. But cold that it was, my entire body started freezing just before Vasisht, and I turned back with some 250m to cover.I rode back to Manali, arriving at the central trisection at 10pm. This agent from hotel Chelsea turned up, offering a room with a view, and a geyser in 330 bucks (incl some tax).

    30th November

    It is a decent hotel, just after the monastery turn, with an okay view and decent room service food. The linen is bad but the bathroom and the carpeting make up for it! Woke up to a lazy morning, went down to the lane to have chai/omelette/fen from a roadside fellow and befriended this hungry dog - gave it some biscuits to eat as well.
    Somehow, Manali does not really qualify in my notion of a true hill station - when one wakes up in the morning, its not with the cold shiver that comes with the chilly breeze wafting down from the mountains. I would anyday rate Shoja or Marhi/Gulaba and actually Narkanda much higher.

    Chai and a relaxing half hour steam bath later, I started for Rohtang at about 9:30am. The moment I crossed the washed away bridge before Bhang, I almost felt overwhelmed.
    Excited, to be in the lap of the himalayas, to be attempting Rohtang again.
    Scared, to face my archenemy Rohtang, and that my bike could give up again.
    My entire body was almost tingling with the excitement, and was feeling more alive than I'd felt in months.

    It was a kinda time warp in comparison. The Rohtang I had seen earlier, was clogged with endless army/BRO trucks, senseless tourist taxis, and the last time I came, the bike felt comfortable only doing 40-45. This time, again fully loaded, the bike was doing 50-60 easily, and there was very little traffic. And yes, there was snow on all peaks I could see [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Riding at an easy clip, I soon rode past Kothi, and within 5km of Gulaba, I finally had my first encounter - with both snow, by the roadside, and black ice on the road. Incidentally, I found it much more troublesome downhill than uphill and continued to ride easily.

    Just around Gulaba, things began to look good. In some parts, the road was basically slushy tyre tracks, and the tourist taxis began to stop by the roadside, while I slowed to the first gear to make my way through the muck. Past that, it was beautiful, ice in the middle of the road (car tyres ensured two lanes for me to peacefully ride in!). Soon after Gulaba, there was a police checkpost, that stopped cars from going further. Here, there were only local 'Snow Rider' taxis (some with slick tyres [​IMG]) that were taking people/snow mobiles to Marhi for skiing. However, I managed to convince the constables that I was going on my own risk.

    I had barely proceeded a km ahead when I met my first good all-ice patch, with the bike loosing all semblance of grip on the 15m stretch of ice. The wheels were spinning although there was no burnout happening [​IMG] Being the stubborn fella I am, I carried on further through another couple of km, till I got this huge patch of ice. Here the bike proved to be a b*tch in pushing across, and the maggi walas helpfully informed me that the bridge at Marhi, some 7 oddkm ahead was out! So, I parked my bike with them, took out my cam, and walked on further.
    [​IMG]

    The best part of being solo is that one has no tensions, no timetables, no schedules to stick to. This time, I was playing is easy - unlike the usual regimented trips where I leave by 7am and ride/click all day. I was in no hurry to get ahead, cause I knew, even ahead, I would only get more snow - which wasnt worth the 300 bucks 'snow riders' were asking to take me to Marhi [​IMG]!
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Thereafter, I just spent time photographing the scenery, and chatting up other travellers(who carried on walking from the barricade). In between, I also figured out the secret for getting good pics on a solo trip - ask everyone passing by to take pics, and keep camera in infinite burst mode! Chances are that inadvertently, a coulpe of pics do come out nice. I walked till a bit ahead of the Rahala falls, which were completely frozen [​IMG] before turning back. Met a Nepali dude along the way who comes here in Winter to peddle skiing, and who was helping a bunch of kids to ski. The dude was like krish on skis, just jumping down across a sheer snow face like no one's business.
    [​IMG]

    And yes, in between I found a vehicle with REAL XXXX Torque :p
    [​IMG]



    There I did something very very fun - slide on tube in ice!! They had these truck tyre tubes with ropes that one sat in. One fellow would climb up with me, to some 35-40 feet up, and you'd sit in the tube, then go barrelling down the fresh snow with the guy at the bottom trying to break your fall, while the other would hold the rope to ensure you moved smoothly! Very very fun experience, worth the twenty five bucks! twas 50 bucks for two, but i free rode on the kids before me, and said 25 for just me [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    After that i did slide a bit in the snow by myself only! Completely fun activity, I heartily recommend it, although can leave asthamatics out of breath [​IMG] Most of my snowy wishes fulfilled, it was time for me to ride back down, towards Vasisht.

    This time, I was much slower, and completely apprehensive of the black ice. Funnily, by the time I was at Solang, I was so not bothered about the surroundings. Almost like I had conquered my inner demons and that the mountains did not matter to me anymore! Was almost like going through the motions - the best part was racing downhill with a bunch of BRO trucks, who were also doing downhill at like 40-50 speeds!

    By 4:30, I managed to reach Vasisht temple. Again, felt good being a biker - cars were stopped some 300m before, while I could ride right up to the temple [​IMG] There are basically three temples there, one of Ram, another of Vasisht, Shri Ram's family guru and another one. Frankly, the temples while well maintained, are pretty much small and nondescript.
    [​IMG]

    To me, the highlight was the hot water (sulphur?) springs. Just as you enter the temple, there are separate bathing areas for men/women. And the smell of sulphur just attacks your senses! Incidentally, in that chilly november evening, while it took me a good two minutes before i could rest my ankles in that bubbling hot water, a couple of foreigners came, stripped and just jumped into the water. I kid you not, they just frigging jumped into the water, and then just hung at the side like you would do at the local pool. If anyone knows how to do that, please tell me!! After the initial heat, it felt really good for my ankle - something I would heartily recommend.

    Overall, I found vasisht a nice albeit crowded place to stay. It's at a higher altitude than Manali, offers a better view of the mountains. Places like Surabhi guest house even have nice parking. And what better way to unwind after a ride than the sulphur springs? [​IMG]

    Therafter, it was a nondescript journey to Manali and up to Hadimba temple. This was a big disappointment. The Hadimba temple is nestled among thick alpine forests that ensure that you need a lucky sunny day before you get some good pics! The temple was basically consisting of a huge pagoda around a small idol. Somehow it seemed a little too large to me.

    The Tibetan monastery although nice, seemed kinda neglected unlike the other temples, like the Hadimba temple or even Vasisht. I personally enjoyed the prayer wheels, and would've liked had something been written in English there. Incidentally, I was curious to ask if it was to the Hinayana or Mahayana sect and about different sects in Buddhism but there was no time. At about 6:30, I collected my bags from the hotel and rode out to Kullu. Unlike last time, the lighting was adequate to ride without incident.

    After a leisurely ride, I checked in to my personal favorite, Snow View guest house and tucked in for a good night's sleep [​IMG]


    1st Morning.

    While snow view guest house failed to live upto its name with the view, it more than made up with the excellent service. Superb food at very reasonable rates, and smiling service - this is going to be where I'll stay, everytime I visit Kullu.

    Again, a late start ensured i moved out of the hotel at 10:30am. crossed the bridge and then began the ascent to Halendi, the last motorable village. Actually, the Kullu bridge is to me, a prime example of wastefulness - an ugly gigantic concrete monolith in the middle of natural beauty. Probably some 'infrastructure' company made millions - this is a wiiiide double lane bridge which has sparse traffic while the Manali beas bridge (which is perenially congested on summer evenings) can take one bus at a time!!

    For the first ten km, the scenery is pretty boring. I mean, its just the same old stuff one sees from Kullu, just that the road keeeps on climbing. After about six-seven km does one get a breathtaking view of the Beas valley, with snow capped peaks in the background, and the
    [​IMG]

    blue-green Beas river looking like a turqoise ribbon weaving its way through. of course, as you ascend, the views improve, and you begin to feel like you're almosssttt there! However, take the next bend, and it seems neither have the kms reduced, nor do the peaks seem any closer.

    Anyways, I resigned myself to the road, and soon enough, the road improved. Actually, it disappeared. The last six kms were pure dirt track heaven. Just mud and stones to ride on. And the stares from the local people just got bigger and bigger [​IMG] Anyways, about a km ahead of Halendi, I finally reached the end of the road, where it disappears into a track. And even along this 'lane' there is some house being built - India rawkks [​IMG]

    Soon, it merges with the stairs that lead to Bijli Mahadev, all 3km of them. Maybe I'm just growing old, Maybe i'm just an asthmatic old fag, but the fatigue just seemed to increase with every step. First, I paused after like half a km of walking uphill, then after some fifty steps, then thirty, and finally, every ten odd steps, i needed to stop to regain my breath. And there was this old graceful lady who was collecting fallen twigs/branches for the coming winter. At like 60/70 she barely paused while working and was taking slow but incessant steps. Made me suddenly feel so old and useless. Although I figured that walking uphill on terrain is better than using stairs!!
    [​IMG]

    Finally, after like an hour and a quarter of walking uphill, *the* mandir comes in view. And once I reach the top, my legs suddenly don't feel so leaden anymore, nor do the lungs seem outta breath. I'm a free bird, and I make my way to the top of the hill. The view, is simply breathtaking. You can see for miiiiiiiiiles, and there are ice capped peaks all around. What made it even more magical is that the mandir is closed due to snowfall from 15th Dec to 10th March. I almost felt a little disappointed. If my plans had been delayed by ten odd days, I would've witnessed snow all around, and snowfall as well. Even then, the view was amazing - so let me shut up and let the pics do the talking.
    The Vista: [​IMG]
    The View from the Temple, looking down:
    [​IMG]
    And yes, the MAN himself [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Oh, and btw, here's the temple too:D [​IMG]

    Ah, and another interesting tidbit about Bijli Mahadev. This place is
    supposed to be having a special shivling, housed inside a two
    stagelarge wooden temple. Yet, every year, (basically when there's too
    much evil in the world) it is hit by lightning and destroyed (is said
    to take on the evil in the world then!). The shivling is then rebuilt
    with butter. You can see quite a bit of kites around the area.

    Anyways, after an hour of lazing in the sun and resting, I descended soon, back to Halendi, in all of 20 min [​IMG] Just stopped for a maggi and then hit the road again, this time to get to Snow View, take my bags, freshen up and then hit the road. The plan was to cross Jalori, but like always, I was late and overambitious. It was dark by the time I crossed the Aut tunnel, and Jalori was impossible. The road to Larji was an ominous harbinger of things to come. The waters of the dam was reflecting the sky and I had no time for a long exposure pic as I was already scared. I could see lights towards the Kullu valley but none in the direction I was going, not even trucks. I saw first lights only at Larji, which frankly is little more than a truck stop and a checkpost. I carried on further to Banjar, some 20km away. Enroute there was only one decent village. Even Banjar lived upto its name.

    The route was via a shady bridge, and though I could see lights here and there, there was no one around. Only when I rode into the bazaar did i see a couple. The lady was very well decked up, and seemed more at place in Manali than this place, but i felt somewhat safe. However, they advised me to try the HPPWD guest house which had two cars parked outside, but no attendant answered my bells/horn. If that didn't make things eerier, the entire market seemed to be deserted. Just light filtering through the window curtains here and there. Only at the bridge did I find a dhaba, and nearby, the only open guest house - Meenu guest house. Clean room, ok linen but finally a room to stay. But even then, I had some REALLY drunk neighbors whose fights and drunken babble kept me awake for a good portion of the night. I had half a mind to carry on, but if this was the local 'town' I shuddered at the possibility of habitation in the next 20km to jalori!!

    2nd December

    Another leisurely start and heavy breakfast at the dhaba ensured I started again at 10. However, now I felt that I was in civilization. The market was open, with the usual hustle bustle. I knew that Jalori wouldn't be easy, and serolsar lake would most probably have to be dropped. Normally, I'm the ride-till-night variety, but Banjar had convinced me otherwise. This 'town' had an average 15 degree incline all through. If this was the base for jalori, then I shuddered at what was in store.
    [​IMG]

    I was not disappointed. Immediately after Banjar, the road climbs sharply for about 5km with regular hairpin bends with sudden sharp inclines. It was here that riding was fun and yet irritating, with the bike being able to maintain third gear easily, yet needing the first gear on hairpins.
    [​IMG]

    The scenery again, is not as impressive as Rohtang. However, the riding is fun with regular gravel at the turns. And the mandir at Jalori could be seen from far, almost mocking me, daring me to ride faster!

    The only next habitation was at Ghiyagi, where there's a wooden guest house next to a stream - very beautiful. From here on, the road just climbs - up up and away. You might be thinking that i'm overreacting but consider this - last 5-6km from Shoja involves an ascent of nearly 1600m. That's as bad as it gets!!

    Shoja seemed to be a nice hamlet, with a couple of mechs and some hotels as well as a PWD guest house. From here on, soon it was mostly dirt track interspersed with snow. The good thing was that there was regular human traffic on the road. It was nice to be able to smile/wave at people - that had been rare on the road since Aut. Soon, I passed a frozen waterfall
    [​IMG]

    and reached Jalori by about 1. Persuaded a family to take my pics by first taking their pics with my bike (and were they eager!) and then asking them to take mine [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Serolsar path wasnt mostly motorable and with all my gear, I was in NO mood to risk it. So I carried on to Khanag. Incidentally, the Shoja side of Jalori had about 3-4km of snow riding and lots of snow around. In contrast, the Khanag side had just some 500m of snow [​IMG] but endless stones, gravel, and broken road. The road this side was an endless boring incline (Those who have seen Kinnaur know how much fun it is to ride with massive towering valleys all around or the dry moony landscapes) - it just seemed to go downhill endlessly without end.
    [​IMG]


    There was no sheer cliff to scare my pants off (like the climb to Sangla), but the progress was irritatingly slow, within some 20km of Ani. from then on, it was a complete race track with me doing like 60-80 downhill. The only issue was a slight loss of pressure in the front tyre, which was taken care of, at Ani. Twas the first time I experienced a faulty compressor - a mech who managed to reduce pressure from twenty to zero. Finally, after 15 mins of his tinkering, I gave up and took my own pump out [​IMG]

    The best part of that interval was the sighting of several vultures just before Ani feasting on a dead calf.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Thereafter, it was boring till Luhri, except the point where Sutlej came in view. The landscape was a bit lunar, like in this pic.
    [​IMG]


    I even went down to the water front, to click a bit of pics. The water was surprisingly not as chill as I'd found it back in May in chitkul [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    From here on, the bike began to feel a bit sluggish and was having trouble climbing. In the last 34km to Narkanda, I had to add about 200ml of oil. Yet the bike wasnt feeling good at all. Took me like eons. Finally, at about 5pm, I chugged into Narkanda. The feeling was just soo good, with snow being my constant companion for the last few km.

    The sky was a bit overcast, and I was too tired, so decided against attempting Hatu. The bike wasnt also feeling good either (and it was climbing Jalori like a goat [​IMG]). Settled in at the Himalayan Hotel (white building just above the main chowk. Was a good feeling, with nice albeit a bit rundown rooms, good staff and steaming hot water - wallah!! The best part about the place was the amazing views, the beautiful colors of the sky from the window, and snow on the porch outside [​IMG]
    Sunset:
    [​IMG]
    Hotel:
    [​IMG]

    Knowing Narkanda to be the little truck stop it actually is, I decided to have dinner in the hotel , and insisted that I would have dinner WITH the caretaker's family only [​IMG] Nothing better than a warm kitchen, good conversation and piping hot food. What turned out to be a bonus was that the caretaker's wife cooked proper home cooked tasty food and had three adorable tiny tots, a 6 yr old boy, a 2 year old baby girl and an absolutely adorable 5 months old angel. The boy was just soooooo cute!!
    [​IMG]


    Anyways, after a scrumptious dinner, I fell asleep, putting paid all my grand pilaans for night photugraphy and all that jazz [​IMG]

    3rd Morning

    Awoke to a bright brand new day. took some morning pics, though not many vistas given the general cloud cover.
    [​IMG]

    Went down to a dhaba and helped cook my own breakfast paranthas (ab kya karen, my mom's trained me well [​IMG]), then chugged on to Hatu. I had almost given up on it, in favor of reaching Delhi early, but thank God - and Hatu was worth every minute of the ride. Its about 7.5km from Narkanda, and the last five km are through snow. Mostly dirt track with soft fresh snow, I was loving every moment of it. Unlike other peaks, the view wasnt as good while going up - till I reached the peak. I'd heard that it was stupendous, but by far it was the best place. Bijli mahadev had better vistas, but this was totally developed, had a road, and snow all around [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    #1
  2. hitanshu

    hitanshu Free-Rider

    Joined:
    May 29, 2006
    Oddometer:
    67
    Location:
    Delhi, India
    (broken up due to the 30k chars limit being hit :p)

    I met a group of cool Road survivor boys, who had camped at hatu for the night!! Anyways, took some pics, conned some locals into taking some of me as well. and just hung around soaking in the beauty. This is THE place to camp with buddies, esp like the way we did in pushkar! *sniff*

    A RS bike:
    [​IMG]

    Pics from Hatu:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Hairpin-e-Hatu:
    [​IMG]
    After that, it was a race to Delhi. Starting back at about 11:30 from Hatu,I clicked a couple of pics on the way down, picked up my luggage, blew one last kissie at the cute baby and statred riding. Barely 10km out, there was a massive ticking sound from the odo. Took me a minute and then I realized that my odo had broken - the speedo was running, albeit in discrete increments but the odo was stuck - good for my resale value but very irritating. I took several stops to try and remedy the issue, but to no avail. Finally, I took the speedo cable out. Another issue was that even downhill, bike was feeling sluggish and not rev happy. So, at Shimla (which is nothing but a completely avoidable ugly concrete jungle) I changed the bike engine oil to elf Sporti, and again the bike was happy again. incidentally, it hadnt eaten any oil, just that the old oil had lost its punch.

    Stopped to have some lunch at Shoghi by 2 and from there on, was scraping pegs and racing almost all vehicles. The Parwanoo-Solan-Shimla road is a screamer but otherwise too trafficed and boring. Finally reached Ambala at like 5:30, when I took a nap and rested for some time. Thereafter, some more boring highways all the way back to delhi to come home by like 11. [​IMG]

    PS: All ye guys with those amazing BMW/KTM bikes - please come to India - i'd love to see you guys handle the snow and learn how!

    PPS: Total cost over five days, petrol, stay, food all included was just 3800 Rs or $85. The bike averaged 114 miles per gallon or just about 48 kmpl :)
    #2
  3. bigrichard

    bigrichard Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2001
    Oddometer:
    2,242
    Location:
    Northern California
    Thanks :thumb
    #3
  4. Aandy

    Aandy Tornado in disguise

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3
    Location:
    Pune, India
    Really loved the writeup. Even more the fact that you ventured for the trip all alone and shed all the appehensions that might have surfaced after Chanderjeet opting out. Great ride, great story, of course by a great guy. :lol3

    I still haven't tasted the Himalayas properly, and i'm gonna hit the Him Land soon. Till then such oven hot stories will keep keep my fetish for the Himalayan chill at bay.

    Wish me luck...
    #4
  5. GB

    GB . Administrator Super Moderator Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2002
    Oddometer:
    67,921
    WOW! What an amazing report! You need to check the Dirttrack productions DVD of Riding Solo to the top of the World! Same kinda ride :thumb
    #5
  6. hitanshu

    hitanshu Free-Rider

    Joined:
    May 29, 2006
    Oddometer:
    67
    Location:
    Delhi, India
    Thanks Gadget Boy, but THAT is well, in the league of legends. I was just sightseeing from the seat and observing the vistas - Gaurav (of above ride u mention) actually took videos, and painstakingly so.

    In fact, there's a shot of him under a bridge, which apparently took about two days - to figure out the location, to experiment with camera angles, and then the usual wash, rinse repeat with multiple retakes.:clap

    My weekend ride isn't even of same kind as the Riding Solo DVD. But yeah, I will better that, someday :D

    Thanks for the appreciation, mate.

    Heh, cmon man. Now you're being overly nice. Even the original Leh ride was a solo plan of much grander proportions across way less inhabited areas.

    And no, let these stories stoke the fire within - and get you to the Himalayas asap.

    Yes, you have all my wishes, but now, get on with it :D

    PS: Leh in end/late June? This time, want to make it a truly adventurous ride so that we can experience atleast some strong hailstorms andmaybe some leftover snow on the route besides the regulation chilly water crossings :D Wotsay?
    #6
  7. hitanshu

    hitanshu Free-Rider

    Joined:
    May 29, 2006
    Oddometer:
    67
    Location:
    Delhi, India
    On some members' suggestions, placed the best pics Inline :D

    Seeing ze big picture, yet? :p
    #7