Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. AlbySA

    AlbySA Adventurer

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    Hi again I've just finished checking the starter relay with the Multimeter set at 20k ohm resistance and get a reading of zero resistance and the workshop manual states that it should be 3.96 ohm's. I believe this indicates that the starter relay isn't doing what it is suppose to do and needs to be replaced. Thank you for your guidance on fault finding.
  2. ScottFree

    ScottFree Long timer

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    Much to my surprise, I saw only one Himalayan at the Red Mouse--mine. Did see a really tasty Bullet bobber (I think it was an actual English-made one, though I didn't lift its tail to check), will post pic later. There may have been a couple Himmas at Leland (I encountered a couple at the previous run, back in 2019), but thanks to a major fustercluck courtesy of the highway department (a succession of detours upon detours that sent me through downtown Baraboo and then forced me to run the four-lane into a 40mph wind) I didn't get to stop in Leland.
    Doctor T and bomber60015 like this.
  3. buckthedog

    buckthedog Eastbound and down

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    @AlbySA Sometimes resistance or Ohm values are rather specific, as in a range, sometimes their range isn't as important (unless you're the engineer designing the thing) but the one thing all resistance values have in common is that they must be present, i.e., you must have a reading for work to take place. Oh, and never Ohm out an energized part. A Zero or 0 reading is a dead short, a loss of continuity or simply said, a break in the wire.

    So, you are getting no reading, meaning no work is going to happen from that part. Now, next thing:

    • Ground one side of your meter to common (neutral) and follow the + 12VDC from the battery into the "intake" or where the wire goes INTO the starter relay. Still see 12VDC because that cable/wire is intact, right? Now see if the voltage leaves the relay. Likely not. So if you have current entering a "thing" be it a relay, control board, whatever, and if you cannot trace the current out of it, that "thing" is bad. In your case it's a relay, in a refrigerator or home ac unit its a control board, power in needs power out. Power in, and no power out, time to replace. (It get a little more technical than that, but really not. It's physics, electricity needs to complete a loop or a circuit, it can't just end somewhere)

    • Last thing since you have nothing to lose. (This next move I am about to tell you requires the precision of a moon landing)... Relays can get sticky inside, as they have contact points that physically move, especially if they are mounted "upside down" with the prongs facing the sky. They are sealed...but... Take it off the bike, hold it in your hand, and whack the hell out of it with a rubber mallet or plastic screwdriver handle. Then Ohm it back out. Repeat. You can even try prying the shell open just a little bit and give it a tiny squirt of contact cleaner and shake it. Don't do this more than once/twice. Repeat Ohm test. If it still gives 0 resistance, you tried anyway, it's still bad. 50% shot or better it fixes it. This applies to all relays.
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  4. byteofthecherry

    byteofthecherry Been here awhile

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    Well mine was nowhere near fitting the bolthole, at least 3 cm out, also the crease was in the wrong place, I had to make an extra bracket, however this gave me room to play about, and it gave an acceptable clearance down by the foot peg. I had also bought the A.D. moto bash plate but the Delkavic pipe is a much larger bore so had to get creative with the angle grinder/cutter.(sent AD pics/info ...no blame attached, fits perfectly with the stock pipe/givi bars) strangely enough the 'can' hanging bracket was too short so will have to make a proper one but the 'can' although the 'shorty version' seems to run parallel with the swing arm with no outward 'splay'

    Attached Files:

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  5. WitchCityBallabio

    WitchCityBallabio Guzzi weirdo

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    Interesting. Mine fit pretty well and stayed straight and up tight to the bike. I wonder if there are some variances in angle of the exhaust pipe.

    [​IMG]
  6. Beemerboff

    Beemerboff Long timer

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    Your relay/ solenoid should have four wires , two small ones for switched power and earth to activate the contacts, and two large ones for the main power from battery to starter.
    The switch wires should have a resistance, the battery wires will read open circuit when the contacts are apart , and ideally zero or close to it when the switch wires are livened up and contact is made.
    DAHIK means - don't ask how I know - and indicates the writer has had first hand experience with a similar problem, rather than read something somewhere or just speculation.
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  7. byteofthecherry

    byteofthecherry Been here awhile

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    Here you...!!!
    Yeah...but your still using the stock downpipe

    Attached Files:

  8. Doctor T

    Doctor T Gruppy old git

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    It makes me wonder if slight changes are made between the years. I wouldn't be happy if bought a full system that is designed for the bike and finding that i had to make my own bracket to fit. It may be worth giving Delkavis an email to find out if a bracket is missing.
  9. byteofthecherry

    byteofthecherry Been here awhile

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    Some confusion...??...the bracket(unless you mean the hanger bracket..??) was there just the fitting holes did not marry up...one of the reasons(IMHO) that after market vendors should make slotted fitting holes(slots:-)) the AD bash guard is superbly made, however the RE frame is not... I suspect tolerances may be a trifle too 'tolerant' I had no problem fitting but had to ease the hole sizing(I always assemble evrything very 'slack'…as long as the thread goes finger tight I then move to the next) a size up(as I'm a great user of penny washers it never really matters)

    I bought the system in Dec 20 but just fitted.
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  10. buckthedog

    buckthedog Eastbound and down

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    What @Beemerboff said. I should have been specific. When no power is connected, 2 of the contacts should have a resistance, the trigger or coil leads, and 2 should not, as when the switch is not powered, those contacts are "NO" or normally open. The electricity or handlebar switch sends electricity into the coil which closes the connection, allowing power to flow out to the lights, gps, or whatever you want to turn on.

    There's some really good images of how relays work. All it is is a switch that allows a small amount of voltage to turn on a thing with larger voltage.
    Beemerboff likes this.
  11. Doctor T

    Doctor T Gruppy old git

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    Yes, i did mean the hanger bracket.
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  12. CaptainTrips

    CaptainTrips Long timer

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    That looks like the OEM header pipe to me. We are talking about the full Delkevic header and can.
  13. CaptainTrips

    CaptainTrips Long timer

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    That's exactly how mine behaves when the battery is dead. I would get the battery load tested.
  14. sqeeezy

    sqeeezy Been here awhile

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    When you measure a low resistance you should use the lowest range possible, on my meter that would be 200 ohms. This is to give you the best chance of getting an accurate figure. Also once you've set your resistance range as described, short your leads together and note the reading. It's not unusual to get, say 0.5-1.5 ohms depending on your meter and the goodness of your leads and contact. You can subtract this from the reading you get from the starter relay (I'd call it a solenoid).
    Don't rely too much on digital mutimeters when you're doing automotive stuff. They've got a high input impedance and can, for example tell you that you're getting a good 12 volts even if it's coming through wet string. You're actually better with a 12 test lamp soldered to a couple of long cables.
    What I would do if i were you is stick with a nuts-and-bolts approach. Try simply applying the battery directly to the starter motor with a fat jump lead and take the relay/solenoid out of the equation. If that's ok try hot-wiring the relay/solenoid input: that takes the ignition switch and starter button out of the equation. When you narrow it down to a specific area, then, disconnect the battery so as you're not belling a live circuit as @buckthedog warns about. Good luck. Use the schematics.
    buckthedog likes this.
  15. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    I ever tell y'all about the time I completely rewired a bike from nose to tail to fix an un findable intermittent open-short ?
    Battery held a charge magnificently and had full voltage, spent days going over and through each individual connection and every inch of wire never could pin down the open & short. It wasn't in the harness. It was in the battery. Doing a proper load test in the first place instead of just being satisfied with voltage would have saved all that.
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  16. buckthedog

    buckthedog Eastbound and down

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    ^^^^ Dang. I didn't know that about using digital meters on auto/motorcycles. It's all I use. Love my Fieldpiece.
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  17. Mortifine

    Mortifine Adventurer

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    IMG_4318.JPG

    Himalayan in the Barber Museum!
  18. sqeeezy

    sqeeezy Been here awhile

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    it's just a beware...a cruddy corroded connection can still show you a nice big voltage: in that respect the old analog meters were better. Or a simple test lamp which actually lets a reasonable current flow/presents a realistic load to the circuit. I use my old Fluke DVM, but if I won't rely on digi voltage measurements to confirm good continuity from source to load.
  19. sqeeezy

    sqeeezy Been here awhile

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    The brain is the weakest link: I fixed an oscilloscope once, (thinking I was super-smart using the scope to scope itself) I got a potential difference between two points, but when I checked with a DVM I got perfect continuity, rinse, repeat, rinse, repeat, [email protected]#%$, scratch head...in the end I found a hairline crack in the pcb which made contact when i pushed harder with the DVM probes, cos I had to, they weren't so sharp, but which stayed apart when I used the naked scope probe which was very sharp.
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  20. CaptainTrips

    CaptainTrips Long timer

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    My cheapo digital multi-meter has battery test modes. It puts a bit of load on the battery. In terms of accuracy on ohm readings, I was helping a friend install a heated floor element. Part of the installation was to check the resistance of the heat cable after each step and record the result for warranty purposes. My cheapo multi-meter lacked the range to do this accurately. Fortunately, my friend had a good Fluke digital multi-meter that had the correct range to match the factory test results.
    Eatmore Mudd likes this.