Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. CaptainTrips

    CaptainTrips Long timer

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    More puzzlement about master links: My preference is to remove the clip-style master link when I remove the rear wheel. For me, it just makes it easier to break the chain rather than loosen and muck about with the chain tensioner and it makes it easier to put the wheel back without the need of readjusting the chain. Also, I like to monitor the wear on the master link pins and regrease it.

    My puzzlement comes from my difficulty in ordering or buying the correct 525 master link for the Hima OEM chain. No one really knows how to identify it. Before my last trip, I went to my Hima dealer and tried to buy a couple, and was told that "the master link comes with a new chain". Then, I walked in off the street with my link in hand at my local no-brand motorcycle shop and went home with a link that turned out to be 2mm too large (pin diameter). This has happened twice.

    But further to that, twice now, I have bought spring clip master links that are impossible to assemble. In both cases, the removable outer plate will not go onto the pins far enough to allow the spring clip to be installed. In both cases, the pins had a step that prevented the "assembly without tools" of the link. With the latest one, I even tried to press the plate onto the pins using a vise and moderate pressure, but it does not fit. WTF??

    I have succeeded once in ordering a new clip online that worked. But this time, I ended up using the new spring clip from the link that does not fit (and cannot be assembled) on the previous link, since that seems to be the critical part.
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  2. millman84

    millman84 Been here awhile

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    When removing the rear wheel you can take the axle out first without loosening the adjusters then roll the wheel forward and that will give you enough slack to remove the chain. It can be a little tight for the chain to get between the sprocket carrier and the swingarm but with a little work it can be done.
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  3. jcw64

    jcw64 Been here awhile

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    Interesting observation. I'm after a new split link too. I've had it off once, and will remove again in the next few weeks to attempt a front sprocket change. Going to have a browse to see what I can find online.
  4. CaptainTrips

    CaptainTrips Long timer

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    Like I said, it is just my preference to remove the link and regrease/replace it regularly.
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  5. jcw64

    jcw64 Been here awhile

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  6. CaptainTrips

    CaptainTrips Long timer

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  7. little ackman

    little ackman Been here awhile

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    So far, I am out of bed and breathing, which is always a good sign.
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  8. jcw64

    jcw64 Been here awhile

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  9. stinkygod

    stinkygod Adventurer

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    Not what I expected...Biggest change yet...Seat Concepts tall..I thought I was buying a premade seat, was a bit disappointed at first, but it was super easy to assemble.

    It's firmer, wider, better than either the stock seat or the factory touring seat....

    But it's the height. I can throw my leg over, even with the factory panniers and i can just about get both heels down on level ground. I'm 5'8" - 30 inch inseam

    But the bike has disappeared.... I've always thought it was an attractive bike, I was this quirky old guy on the weird bike.

    But now...I'm flying... I can't see the tank, the extra 1-1/2 inches has lifted me up over my already cut-down screen.

    It makes the bike seem more nimble, maybe more...expendable? like go ahead and try stuff. So I'm wrenching the throttle more, throwing it harder into turns (but still being beat by toddlers on pedal-less schwinns).

    It has made the bike fun. This week end I will join my boss and 35 others on an extended 300 mile gravel ride through the Mendocino forest. I just Hope I can keep up with the CT's

    5 stars, highly recommend.
  10. ScottFree

    ScottFree Long timer

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    I had to go master link shopping a year or so ago, when I found my OEM master link hadn't been greased before installation and was significantly worn (as in >1 mm of metal gone from the pins on the load-bearing side). At the time, Doctor T said Hitchcocks recommended a "JT" master link. I found it at Dennis Kirk for $3.28 (US)... and eight bucks shipping... I see it is now down to $3.08 (same eight bucks shipping, I'm sure), but is currently out of stock. As is almost everything...

    However, if you can get one, I can vouch for it being a perfect fit to the OEM chain. I ran mine for a good eight months before I replaced the chain. I've still got it in my collection of spares.
  11. hachico

    hachico Adventurer

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    View attachment 3103755 I show you my logistics for a 12 hour trip. The rigid suitcases are easy to disassemble and take to the hotel. In addition, to avoid back fatigue, I have the support in the central case and for the lower back I have a trick. as you can see in the photos

    Attached Files:

  12. hachico

    hachico Adventurer

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    20200725_080346-2.jpg 20210725_095839.jpg
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  13. ScottFree

    ScottFree Long timer

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    The SC Tall is indeed nice. The one downside I ran into is that (like the stock seat) it still tilts down a bit at the front, and depending on the grippiness of the material (or whatever you put on top of it), you may slide forward and squish the family jewels against the back of the tank.

    I fixed this problem by elevating the front of the tank. Like this:

    IMG_2236.JPG

    Plastic support blocks bolted to the frame (higher at front than at back), and a new piece to retain the seat tongue, shimmed up on longer tank mounting bolts. I used countersunk screws and nuts to secure the support blocks through existing holes in the frame pieces that the rubber pads on the bottom of the seat rest on. Getting nuts on the screws was surprisingly difficult, and if I had it to do over again I would just choose a size of screw that can be tapped into the holes. Blocks were then topped with adhesive furniture footpads, about 1/8" thick. The result is a seat sufficiently level that I can use a Bead Rider bead cushion and not slide into the tank when riding. Very nice indeed. I just got back from a trip to Colorado and Utah where I did up to 400 mile days and rode in temperatures over 100º F in reasonable comfort (the bead cushion is, in my opinion, indispensable for such trips).

    This is not an original idea but I cannot at the moment remember who first suggested shimming the front of the seat so it sits level.

    And yes, it is really nice when the bike just seems to disappear under you. Or, seen another way, it becomes an extension of your body.
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  14. Kiwi59

    Kiwi59 Been here awhile Supporter

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    Yes its what they call baby steps. Well done and long may it continue.
    Cheers Brian:photog
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  15. Kiwi59

    Kiwi59 Been here awhile Supporter

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    great work. may look at it on the standard seat.:y0!
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  16. Kiwi59

    Kiwi59 Been here awhile Supporter

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  17. Clonkex

    Clonkex n00b

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    Dang this thread moves fast! Didn't get email-notified about this post so my reply is a bit late, sorry.

    Yeah that's very likely the case. It was totally flat the last time I got the bike out after a few weeks in the shed, as well as the time before that (also after a couple of weeks in the shed). Could be the tiny drain from the Oxford heated grips but I would expect that to be in the 10s to 100s of µA range given that it would be only powering the microcontroller (which should mean at least several thousand hours of runtime on a bike battery before it drained it). More likely the battery was a bit garbage to begin with and is just toast now.

    Typical, just bought oil from Mxstore yesterday and could have saved on shipping. Suppose I've still gotta figure out what size the battery needs to be anyway.

    Just a shame the battery is so difficult to get out of its hidy hole :fitz
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  18. sqeeezy

    sqeeezy Been here awhile

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    Me too, I found I had to ream the edges of the holes slightly and file the pins carefully, in a sandy backyard in Mauritania with a Leatherman to get the plate onto the pins, and even after that it was a tight fit. I was taking care, I was offering the pieces together square. This was in order to fit my OEM chain with another RE chain, but I can't remember if the splitpin assembly was from the RE chain kit or from some spare split-links I'd brought with me.
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  19. slownold

    slownold Been here awhile

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    Just get one for a Mack truck, it won't fit in the frame but you'll have something to jump start your bike from :rofl
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  20. DaveH55

    DaveH55 Been here awhile

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    Probably more to do with the inherent Himalayan engine noise (intake?) than it is connected to chain slap :D
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