Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. lipsee

    lipsee Been here awhile

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    £500 smackers is abit saltly for me,,,, checkout Lomo soft bags £50
    talmage likes this.
  2. nathanthepostman

    nathanthepostman Been here awhile

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    It'd be interesting to hear how much of that stuff they have in stock. I heard October for the next delivery of panniers and those handlebars I've been waiting on since the bike came out. I think RE and the importer has been taken a bit by surprise by its popularity. I saw that it was the best selling adventure bike for August here in the UK, which isn't bad going for a new release.
    Bojer, mjhb, Retro Iron and 1 other person like this.
  3. talmage

    talmage Adventurer

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  4. talmage

    talmage Adventurer

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    Does our beloved Himalayan have a way to flash all of the turn signals at once (i.e. hazard lights)? I haven't found it in the manual or on the bike. My 2003 Aprilia Atlantic 500 has a switch for that. I wouldn't have thought much about it but I recently watched an episode of The Grand Tour (S2E8) in which the three blokes drove in mountain fog so thick they couldn't see more than a car length ahead. I pictured myself in that situation and suddenly I desperately want those hazard lights.

    Here is a solution from India: https://simtacauto.com/product/pnp-re/. As I type this, the vendor says the part is out of stock. In the review section, the vendor says the part will be in stock today, June 20.
  5. chArj_Himalayan

    chArj_Himalayan Adventurer

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    Indianapolis, IN
    Question 1:
    Hello everyone, a question for the ones with Panniers, how good are they at taking a fall, say offroad.... I have a trip planned where I will hopefully be hitting up some trails with gear loaded on the bike for camping. I am thinking about soft luggage like Giant Loop's Great Basin.

    My thinking with going soft is, weight savings, better fuel economy, less air drag, robust in terms of taking a few falls and narrow overall width.

    Question 2:
    Also, the above mentioned Hitchcock sprocket sizes could be interesting, I would love to add some top speed with lower RPM than stock, but my Himalayan practically needs to be revved up to at-least 3k RPM to behave "normally", it really seems comfortable in the range of 3-4.8k. So it might actually make it harder to ride in city/offroad type of a setting... thoughts?

    Has anyone felt the same, low rpm engine response with theirs? (I mean it is a long stroke after all, and I would think it would inherently be tough to have a smooth engine response at low engine speeds and low loads for a long stroke configuration)
  6. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    How many miles you clicked up ? I ask because after 500 mine was reving easier and running smoother. By 1,500 she was a different motor. :-)
  7. Sriracha

    Sriracha Adventurer

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    How closely did you follow the work-in recommendations Mudd?
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  8. Capt. Gary

    Capt. Gary Been here awhile

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    After 1500 mine has a completely different sound and is running much happier still getting a solid 70 mpg
  9. chArj_Himalayan

    chArj_Himalayan Adventurer

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    Indianapolis, IN

    I have about 3000 miles, it is definitely much much better than while it was breaking in. I also have problems getting the bike to idle, it dies off when you first start it up and ride for the first 15 mins randomly, usually when coming to a stop, or while sitting at a light and as soon as you click in 1st gear...
  10. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    Pretty dang close.
  11. GeoMoto

    GeoMoto Head Flying Monkey Supporter

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    Always go soft if you plan on hitting off road trails. The hard panniers are unforgiving and will ruin your day. I only use Hard for street trips. Soft is forgiving when laying on your leg and takes the abuse from tip overs better.
  12. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    chArj_Himalayan, the pannier system is very strong and stout, probably over built. The racks are 3/4 inch diameter steel thick wall tube ( not water pipe ) and the boxes are .078 thick Aluminum. Meaning both are beefier than than most other brands factory options. I plan to not crash test them and ride that plan on pavement and gravel. For the back woods and places I expect to have drops I have soft bags.
  13. air4life

    air4life Adventurer

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    Oh yeah, thanks. Now that you mention it, I do recall something like that being stated. I'm hoping the dealer I buy from will keep that in mind when I talk turkey.

  14. Bar None

    Bar None Long timer Supporter

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    On the Dragon Eastern TN.
    RE.jpg
  15. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    You can always tell the dealer check the bearings while you watch or the deal is off. I mean it's only five bolts and took me all of 15 minutes with hand tools and a cup of coffee to check mine.
  16. air4life

    air4life Adventurer

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    I had no idea it was that easy to do the head and rear linkages that quick. I do very much like the sound of that. Thanks E. Mudd.

    Currently I'm working on finding places to put my garage stuff that's overflowing into my utility trailer. I hope within a week to have it cleared out.
    eakins likes this.
  17. azccj

    azccj Adventurer

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    Received my new Hyperpro shock yesterday and installed it. The install wasn't all that bad and if it wasn't for the airbox being in the way of the upper shock bolt it would have been just a 15 minute job. Once installed I needed to dial up the preload a bit and the bike now sits a bit higher when I'm on it. Will report back after I get some miles on the bike with the new shock. For those interested the shock was set up for my weight and load, and delivered to my door for $599.00. Very nice shock for the price and comes with a transferable 1st rebuild card, but I would guess it would take me at least 10 years to get to the shock's recommended rebuild mileage of 25-30k miles.

    The last picture is of the new shock next to the Himalayan OEM shock. What I find odd about the OEM shock is it has a progressive spring but all the tighter coils are nearly touching each other with no weight on the removed shock, and when the shock is mounted with just the weight of the bike, with no rider, the tighter coils all are touching, making the spring no longer progressive as the remaining coils are all the same. In comparison the Hyperpro also uses a progressive spring, but it's spring's tighter coils don't contact each other making it actually progressive.

    IMG_1213.JPG IMG_1215.JPG IMG_1216.JPG IMG_1224.JPG
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  18. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    For the margins I would not expect much.

    You could argue their prep fee should include checking the grease in the linkages and head for grease. I'm sure they will balk as that's never done, but you can try.

    In the end, a better tactic might be to get additional labor right then at a discount price. Tell them you know the bearings are underpacked and you are willing to pay an additional $100 flat fee to get both of them properly packed if we can make a deal today on the bike.

    Or negioate the best deal for you out the door and pay an independent shop to do it...or even better yet get to know your bike and do it your self. It's not hard and you really need to know how to take off the wheels.

    Can you change a flat? If not learn or you will be screwed out in the field one day.
    Bain Dramage and Eatmore Mudd like this.
  19. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    Nice!

    Is that the cheaper emulsion shock or the $ air / oil separated shock?

    How about upgrading to catridge style valves up front to match the potential?

    I was thinking Cogent might do something too.
  20. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    Of course you took off your rear tire too?

    How was the grease content in yours?

    Head bearing check too?