Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. Kiwiscoot

    Kiwiscoot Been here awhile

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    Why did you take it off? does it make the bike run better?
  2. nathanthepostman

    nathanthepostman Been here awhile

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    Try this one Eatmore.



    Not many shots of the bike but it did the trip just fine. She's due in the dealership for a bit of an overhaul next week. The clacking noise has picked up a bit so they're going to investigate that. It's at pick up off the bottom. Still runs well though.
  3. Loadtoad101

    Loadtoad101 Been here awhile

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    742
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    Livingston TN
    Those are some talented tubes, check out this feature according to the description on Amazon.
    • EASY INSTALLATION: No Tool Required, It Takes Less Than 5 Minutes To Replace The Inner Tube :lift
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  4. MrDralas

    MrDralas Super n00b

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    North of somewhere
    Some people that live in larger cities like smog?
    They shouldn’t Chang how it runs, but it’s probably the same thing as catalyst converters, when they first started coming out in the 70’s and before they would get clogged up by people running leaded gas and reduce flow thus reducing power. It hasn’t been a problem in over 30 years but some how the stigma seems to stick, even with people that never encountered the problem.
    Old air injection systems in cars where where run on a pump, any thing that runs off a accessory belt has a parasitic draw while the engines running and steals hp.
    Erg well they only work when you don’t need power and recycle exhaust gas to cool the combustion to reduce NOx but people also seem to think it takes power so people remove them.

    I see no reason to unless it’s causing a problem and you don’t want to fix it for some reason.
    Bojer and Bradster49 like this.
  5. stevenatleven

    stevenatleven Adventurer

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    Scotland
    Know what you mean, he drags it out a bit.
    I'm interested to see how the bike is after he thrashes it all the way to Alaska
    MrDralas likes this.
  6. RossoLinea

    RossoLinea Been here awhile

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    I was already in there doing head and intake work. Since I had it off anyway, I left it off knowing that it typically causes backfiring with an upgraded exhaust. If I want to put put it back on, it is only about a 10 minute job.
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  7. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    Hey man I'm not picking on you here. There is a flip side to this stuff most folks don't know. Also not knowing = not understanding. Just sharing some info.

    Early cats were hit and miss. I mean the designs were new and experimental and the process of making them was new and evolving and so were emission control systems. My uncle had one melt down inside. He wasn't the only one. No car maker wanted to replace them under warranty. They were expensive. The failure was always the owners fault for putting regular in instead of unleaded. Or your wife put regular in it or... Took some serious arm twisting, a lawyer, and some favors to get his replaced under warranty. His fuel log book and receipts were key. Every drop of gas, every mile and every penny spent were accounted for in own hand writing. My aunt never had to put gas in the car car because my uncle took care of it..

    The folks de catting their bikes I see do it to lower restriction because they want to make more power. A couple fellas did it to make less heat because the in the exhaust heat was frying their undersides.

    We're burning gas to make heat, making heat to make pressure. Reduced temperatures = reduced pressure = reduced pressure on the piston crown = reduced power output at the crank for the same amount of fuel/air pumped through the engine.
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  8. kitkat

    kitkat Been here awhile

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    Oddometer:
    577
    Location:
    california
    Can someone direct me to the procedure or instructions for the valve adjustment?

    I have the euro service and engine manuals. The only reference that I found is on page 99 of the engine manual.
    [​IMG]

    Do I need the adjustment tool (Royal Enfield special tool # st-27527-2) or can I use my sockets and wrenches? The tools is expensive compared to similar looking tools on amazon.

    Amazon has this tool set with adjustment wrench and feeler gauges, just need to know what size to get and if you guys know can you please let me know? Thanks!!
    https://www.amazon.com/Sala-Ctr-Uni...eywords=motorcycle+valve+adjustment+tool&th=1

    Thanks!!
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  9. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    A bunch of us use needle nose pliers and a 10 mm wrench. If you never adjusted screw and lock nut valves before it's probably going to take some getting used to as for what drag on the feeler gages is supposed to feel like. If the feeler glides smooth as silk instead of drags then it's on the loose side of things.
    fe2cruz and kitkat like this.
  10. kitkat

    kitkat Been here awhile

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    577
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    california
    Cool, I can do that!

    Will this tool help, I'm assuming it would be the 10mm version? It's for 3 mm square top,
    https://www.amazon.com/Sala-Ctr-Universal-Motorcycle-adjustment-0-02-1mm/dp/B07KBG68HB/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1544379289&sr=8-9&keywords=motorcycle+valve+adjustment+tool&th=1
    ScotchmanDR and Eatmore Mudd like this.
  11. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    Wet side of WA.
    That one might work. It looks pretty slim. One of our fellow Himalayan owning inmates reported that the one from Motion Pro was to bulky to fit in the engine space. One thing to make sure of is the inside adjuster piece needs to be for 3mm square that our bikes have and not for flat tip screw driver slot.

    add: went and took a closer look and yup, pictures show a 3mm square.

    [​IMG]
    ScotchmanDR and voodoochilled like this.
  12. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    Location:
    Southern New Jersey
    EGR systems on cars only work at mid throttle like hiway driving.
    Air injection on cars only works at cold start idle.
    None of that impacts anything but emissions.

    Some cars use a pump to pump air into the exhaust, others use the pulse system.

    On bikes, the pulse system is used. If you get a leak in the system, air can get in the exhaust and screw up the oxy sensor reading (if equipped).
    Exhaust can also leak out past the one way valve and melt things....

    For the little it does on a little bike engine, I would disconnect it and plug it as a trouble spot removed.

    On some bikes like my SR400 and others, it gets in the way of valve service.



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  13. Kiwiscoot

    Kiwiscoot Been here awhile

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    Christchurch, New Zealand
    For our carby folks around here (most of you are EFI folks so not applicable)....
    https://www.bespokemotorcycles.net/...-Enfield-Himalayan---A-long-term-project-bike

    My bike has a stutter sometimes at speed or in a strong headwind. It presents itself when running at constant throttle for a bit and the slowly rolling off and then rolling on the throttle. The bike takes a few gulps as if it is starving of fuel and then it accelerates. I had a Honda Deauville that did the same and took me a while to work out it is the carburettor's diaphragm vent pipe located in a low pressure area in the bike. The Himma's vent pipe is located just behind the engine in front of the back wheel.I played around with the position and seem to have found the solution. This is the vent pipe near the top of the carb.
    vent3.jpg
    Pull it out from where it is behind the engine and I found just under the seat fixed the problem. Felt like the bike ran better too at speed and more up and go to pass.
    vent1.jpg
    Next is to fix the lean idling (bike sometimes dies when the clutch is pulled in and the throttle released, very annoying in traffic) , improve the middle range by changing the position of the needle, etc.
    Eatmore Mudd likes this.
  14. voodoochilled

    voodoochilled Been here awhile

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    Let us know how you make out @kitkat.
    I bought the Motion Pro a while ago but returned it unopened after @GeoMoto mentioned the area around the intake valve was too tight for it to fit.
  15. rockt

    rockt Long timer

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    Canada

    Call me a dinosaur but I'd be perfectly OK with it if the N. America bikes were carbureted. Just so simple, with less stuff. I know all the positives of FI, but this bike is so old school simple in every other way, it would be nice, (to me), to not have a fuel pump and ECU.
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  16. Capt. Gary

    Capt. Gary Been here awhile

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    The oem tool needs to be ground down a little to fit the intake side Adam at speed deluxe showed me how to do it then it works fine
  17. kitkat

    kitkat Been here awhile

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    Oct 3, 2003
    Oddometer:
    577
    Location:
    california
    Can't buy it, it's shipping from china and the delivery time is 2 months. I would like to have it by next weekend!

    Ebay has the same style tool but it seems that the 3mm square wrench is more common with the 9mm socket and some of the 10mm listings don't state the size of the square wrench. All are coming from china so shipping time is too long regardless.

    There's a US seller with a similar tool but they only have the 9mm socket with 3 mm square wrench. It's $9 for both and I'm wondering if that's worth it just to get the square wrench??

    I can use a open 10mm wrench with that or does anyone know if the tiny knipex plier wrench fits in there to pinch the square top? I already have the tiny knipex plier wrench.

    Thanks!!
  18. rockt

    rockt Long timer

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    As I don't yet own a Himalayan, I don't know if this is relevant but it can't hurt to try. On my Suzuki DR's, the head of a Robertson screw fits perfectly over the squared valve adjuster. I cut it down to a manageable size and screwed it into a small piece of dowel and it works great.

    Here is what a Robertson screw looks like, (it's made by a Canadian company so I don't know if it's readily available in the U.S.):

    upload_2018-12-9_18-20-29.jpeg

    EDIT: there are 5 different Robertson head sizes, coded by colour, as follows:

    Currently, there are five different Robertson screwdrivers available, with suitable screw size indicated by the color. Orange drivers (#00) are appropriate for use with screw types 1 and 2. The recess size range (the size of the corresponding square imprint on the screw) is from 1.77-1.80 mm. Yellow drivers (#0) work with screw types 3 and 4 and feature a recess size range of 2.29 to 2.31 mm. Green drivers (#1) operate with screw types 5, 6, and 7, with a recess size range of 2.82 to 2.86 mm. Red drivers function with screw types 8, 9, and 10 and have a recess size range of 3.34 to 3.38 mm. Black drivers work with the largest screws, types 12 and higher, and have a recess range of 4.81 to 4.85 mm.

    So it looks like the Red Robertson screw, at just over 3mm, should work on the Himalayan's valves.
  19. Capt. Gary

    Capt. Gary Been here awhile

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    Marty at go moto took a wide blade screwdriver and ground a slot in it to fit the top and a 10 mm wrench on the bottom a dremel tool would make quick work of it then you have your own special tool
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  20. Kiwiscoot

    Kiwiscoot Been here awhile

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    Feb 14, 2010
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    780
    Location:
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Fitted my Zana pannier/saddle racks/stays. Only US$138 freight included to New Zealand.
    Packaging was very good. Some things were not that well finished, e.g. like this weld that was not tidied up and whoever tapped the 6mm tread drilled the wrong pilot hole, so the thread was so shallow that it stripped. A bit frustrating but nothing an 8mm tap could not fix.
    image003.jpg

    The left side rack was about 20mm lower at the back than the RH one. Used the weight of the bike on a work table to bend it up before tightening everything.
    image004.jpg

    The racks are very sturdy and looks pretty good.
    image005.jpg

    Bought a cheap US$30 saddle bag from AliExpress and I'm very impressed with it. Used some flat stiff 10mm foam sheets and made a stiff internal form for them.
    image009.jpg

    https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Mot...858.html?spm=a2g0s.9042311.0.0.33f94c4d4gdo32
    To be continued...
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