Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    Welcome :wave
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  2. Bar None

    Bar None Long timer Supporter

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    When is your '19 coming in? Like to see it. I live on Winkler Rd.
  3. rockt

    rockt Long timer

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    When (if!) I get my own Himalayan, I'll be doing some short day trips with my significant other and it would be best if she's comfortable. So... would love to hear more about how your bikes handles 2-up riding and if you can share pictures with both of you on the bike, would really appreciate it.
  4. whm3223

    whm3223 Adventurer

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    Yeah no problem. I'll have someone take a photo of us.

    When we were out on the open road, I really didn't even feel her there. It was a super easy ride. I do think a top case with a back rest will be an improvement, though. Already got the reinforced rear rack so I just gotta pick out the right one!
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  5. mxz

    mxz Been here awhile

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    I put a rear Givi Trekker hard top case so that the passenger can rest their back. However, I wouldn’t take the Hima on more than short trips around town when two up. I kind of feel a bit unsafe at highway speeds due to lack of pull after 40mph and squirmy & weakish front brake.

    The Hima is a great scrambler, if not the best, considering it’s price and trail capacity while still looking retro. But I don’t think two up touring is its thing. Maybe in Asia where traffic moves on average much slower.
  6. Landsurfer74

    Landsurfer74 The road goes on forever.

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    I regularly travel two up with my grandson (11 stone) on the rear at motorway speeds without any issue ... and as for the front brake ..... mine is great ,,,,
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  7. whm3223

    whm3223 Adventurer

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    Yeah I'm in Colombia where straight roads don't exist. You don't really get much over 80 kph here. I'm not sure how it would be on US freeways. There are however a couple guys in this thread who have gone on cross-country US tours. They just avoided the interstates and took normal highway routes instead.
  8. ScottFree

    ScottFree Long timer

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    I've been curious about this myself, as I ride all year, down into the 20s (Fahrenheit) with heated grips (40-50 watts) and an electric vest (50 watts). The internet has not been terribly helpful, as it seems most fuel-injected bikes draw upwards of 100 watts just for fuel pump (40) computer (25) and ignition (40). Indeed, according to one site's accessory-draw calculator, a Himalayan can't run, even if no electrical accessories are installed! Of course, these estimates are probably for multi-cylinder bikes with four injectors and four (or even eight) spark plugs. The single-injector, single-plug Himalayan obviously consumes less power. One fourth as much? Probably a bit more than that. It's hard for me to imagine the computer-ignition-pump consuming less than 50 watts, which, when combined with the 60 for the headlight and maybe a few more for the LED taillight, leaves not much more than 100 watts for accessories. Hmm. Anybody have any actual measurements?
  9. mxz

    mxz Been here awhile

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    I am aware. When on B roads with 90kph limits, it’s absolutely fine. If one has time for it, taking the slower road can be great.
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  10. EMGuero

    EMGuero Been here awhile

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    Yep, works for me living here in the Philippines. I can rarely move over 80kmh, 50-60kmh pretty typical and you're always waiting for that next pothole or break in the road.

    I do leave a bit more room for braking when the gf is on the back. Not that she adds much weight, but the bike needs it. Should probably look into a box of some kind that she can lean back on. Our last two-up trip was 270km (x2) and she said the seat was comfortable but could've used something to lean on.
  11. mettalique

    mettalique Been here awhile

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    You will have to beef up the rear rack in that case, there have been many rack failures. Wouldn’t be a good thing to have someone leaning on it when it breaks
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  12. rburton59

    rburton59 n00b

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    For those of us in the US, what is a stone?
  13. Loadtoad101

    Loadtoad101 Been here awhile

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    Per wikipedia: The stone or stone weight (abbreviation: st.)[1] is an English and imperial unit of mass now equal to 14 pounds (6.35029318 kg).[nb 1]

    England and other Germanic-speaking countries of northern Europe formerly used various standardised "stones" for trade, with their values ranging from about 5 to 40 local pounds (roughly 3 to 15 kg) depending on the location and objects weighed. The United Kingdom's imperial system adopted the wool stone of 14 pounds in 1835. With the advent of metrication, Europe's various "stones" were superseded by or adapted to the kilogram from the mid-19th century on. The stone continues in customary use in Britain and Ireland used for measuring body weight, but was prohibited for commercial use in the UK by the Weights and Measures Act of 1985
  14. Landsurfer74

    Landsurfer74 The road goes on forever.

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    14 LBS ... thought you guys did Imperial measures .... oh and the weights and measures act of 1985 is ignored in every market place in England ... and soon will be totlay ignored ... another example of the EU telling us what to do !!! And the end of the government Quislings following their masters voices .... alledgley ... lol
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  15. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    They weigh in stone, use Whitworth tools, drink in pints, drive in miles and have no problems at all with metric anything and everything all at the same time. Yup sharp lads. For them it's not either or, it's both.
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  16. Landsurfer74

    Landsurfer74 The road goes on forever.

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    Double + 1
    As an Engineer, i measure in mm, weigh in pounds, measure Mass in KG, and cycle miles to work .... ultimate multi - taskers us Brits.
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  17. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    Sort of imperial. Feet, inches, miles are the same but the the pints and gallons are different over here. Anymore only people from farm and ranch lands or commodity traders know what a peck or bushel is. We don't have any problems with liter water bottles. Measuring small projects in mm isn't tough. Much wailing and gnashing of the teeth would ensue if we switched to liters at the gas pump. Professional and industrial types and smart hobbyists have and easier time of it than the average cell phone addict.

    Added:

    Generalizing and stereotyping a little here but it's not without some basis. "A Britt thinks a hundred miles is a long way, a Yank thinks a hundred years is a long time". :-)
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  18. backcountrywaterboy

    backcountrywaterboy Jobs fill your pockets adventures fill your soul Supporter

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    Speaking of brakes my front brake didn't seam very good, I felt the rotor several times it just felt like it had some sort of film on it. I had some time I removed the front caliper and pads, thoroughly degreased the rotor and pads, then sanded the pads to a fresh surface, I reinstalled everything. It made a very noticeable difference I can now use one finger on the lever in most situations, I'm happy with the front brake now!
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  19. rburton59

    rburton59 n00b

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    I was in Northern Ireland from Nov of '78 until about May ( scary IRA days ) then to Strathclyde Scotland until Dec '80. I thought it was 16 lbs but now being almost 60 yrs old it makes sense that I don't remember . That into makes it easier for us to know how much weight you are carry y two up. Thank you.
  20. Loadtoad101

    Loadtoad101 Been here awhile

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    Out for a ride today about the neighborhood. Water running pretty good right now. IMG_20190128_121308424_BURST029.jpg IMG_20190128_121401872_BURST001.jpg