Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. MtnGoat3

    MtnGoat3 Adventurer

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    Thank you Boatnut!

    Sorry for pestering you much on the thread. :doh
  2. FarklePilot

    FarklePilot Been here awhile

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    No grief... PM me if you need further help re this. It's worth it. These levers are high quality, equivalent to $150 a set ones in my opinion...
  3. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    You can also check with Ebay sellers psutaseller and neverland-motor . Tell 'em where you read about the levers.
  4. MtnGoat3

    MtnGoat3 Adventurer

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    Thanks Eatmore Mudd & Boatnut:ricky
  5. azgsa

    azgsa Dude

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    https://es.aliexpress.com/item/GT-M...2013-2016-DUKE200-RC200-2014/32790143963.html
    If you go to aliexpress.com and search for item 32790143963 the lever page will pop up
  6. azgsa

    azgsa Dude

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    Neither the EVAP nor the air injection delete triggered the check engine light on mine. Haven't ridden it enough to measure fuel economy but doubt it would change much if any.
  7. Flicka

    Flicka Been here awhile

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    Some considerations regarding the SAS;
    according to what is said in Wikipedia in modern engines performs its function purely at cold engine, when the mixture is richer and the catalysts are cold. The secondary injection contributes both to "oxidize" the pollutants and to (consequently) bring the catalysts faster in temperature.
    Also according to Wikipedia, when the engine reaches the operating temperature, the air injection is moved, via a solenoid valve, from the position near the head to one near the catalyst.
    The Himalayan SAS has an on / off, non-two-way solenoid valve and this leads me to think that at a certain point the SAS is simply deactivated.
    That said; as far as I know, eliminating the SAS brings improvements about the temperature but not in performance gain; if what I have said above is true, does it make sense to deactivate it?
    (I'm absolutely not an expert and I wait for the considerations of those who know more than me)
    Bojer likes this.
  8. FarklePilot

    FarklePilot Been here awhile

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    My thoughts are I will be removing the SAS with the idea being to simplify. Less is more kinda thing... Not really expecting any gain in power or fuel economy etc.
  9. Flicka

    Flicka Been here awhile

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    I do not discuss the motivations, but following this line you should also remove the catalysts because without Sas they tend to become clogged. This, at least, what I saw doing in these situations.
  10. Tomocan

    Tomocan Been here awhile

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    Has anyone changed the sprocket ratio?

    Thinking of going up one in the front to give a bit more of a relaxed cruising at highway speeds without affecting the off-road too much.
    sdbruns likes this.
  11. kokomoto

    kokomoto Adventurer

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    Not hard at all. 2500 miles on the odometer is a mix of mostly commuting with some weekend rides in the mountains. Speed Deluxe is going to fix it under warranty. They mentioned that they have had a few Himas with the same issue. Something to keep an eye on.
  12. kokomoto

    kokomoto Adventurer

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    Do you know if the subsequent failure of the head gasket was related to the 2 nuts that needed nipping? Just wondering if the shop should go beyond checking those as a preventative measure.
  13. nathanthepostman

    nathanthepostman Been here awhile

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    There have been a few head gasket failures here in the UK now. Mine included. Mine was fixed under warranty and I'd suspect it's down to incorrect assembly from the factory (could be wrong). Not the biggest issue in the world and relatively easily fixed. If RE could get on top of these niggly issues it'd do them a world of good.
    Bojer and kokomoto like this.
  14. CarstenB

    CarstenB Been here awhile

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    planning the same. Those who tried found out that the original chain is too short, at least when new so you'd need to add one link or get a longer chain. There's an ebay seller offering a kit with a 16t sprocket.
  15. stevenatleven

    stevenatleven Adventurer

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    That seems to confirm what the guys on the UK facebook forum are saying, new chain reqd with a 16t sprocket. One guy reported 4500 rpm at 60mph, I checked my rev counter today 4800 rpm at 60 mph so a little saving, not enough for me to go to all that trouble though i'll just ride a few mph slower.
  16. CarstenB

    CarstenB Been here awhile

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    gearingcommander.com has the Himalayan loaded so you can play around with the different settings.
    60mph with the 15t sprocket is 4630rpm. The 16t brings it down to 4340rpm. I'll try it out once the chain has stretched a bit more.

    b.JPG a.JPG
  17. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    When it went was it a compression leak or an oil leak ?
    Richarde1605 likes this.
  18. RossoLinea

    RossoLinea Been here awhile

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    38/15 = 2.53
    38/16 = 2.38
    36/15 = 2.40
    35/15 = 2.33

    By going with two teeth smaller in the rear (36 tooth) you will have about the same ratio as increasing the front to 16t but will not need to lengthen the chain.

    Regards,

    Ken
  19. CarstenB

    CarstenB Been here awhile

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    correct, it's just easier and cheaper to change the sprocket if chain length allows it. The idea is to have both sprockets when travelling and change them out as needed. Won't take long to stretch the chain enough i hope. Not keen to add another master link.
    Tomocan likes this.
  20. MtnGoat3

    MtnGoat3 Adventurer

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    Mine is weeping from the right side of head on to the cooling fins. At first I could not see & only smell burning oil. Usually happened after prolonged highway runs at 70+mph. Also noticed it one or two times riding off road after bouncing around and holding some higher rpms. Need to check the bolts and NIP them up as Nathan says. I too am wondering if the oil weeping is a precursor to head gasket failure. I may just go the head retorque route too if I find a lot of loose bolts.