Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. CarstenB

    CarstenB Been here awhile

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    i'd be more concerned that the tank guards and pannier racks are not sturdy enough long term and would try to tie it down on the frame and foot peg mounts and top triple tree or handle bars
  2. RossoLinea

    RossoLinea Been here awhile

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    I've been pretty busy over the last month or so and wanted to share some of my updates to my Himalayan. The first are billet aluminum frame plugs:

    him_frame_plugs.jpg

    Regards,

    Ken
  3. Loadtoad101

    Loadtoad101 Been here awhile

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    I used those points to keep the straps straight and not rub or chafe on any other parts. I'm thinking I might use some chain, turnbuckles or small square tube to attach from the carrier to the foot pegs. I watched a lot of you tube videos with those types of tie down solutions from aftermarket vendors to DIY backyard mechanics. Anybody have thoughts on the subject?
  4. Capt. Gary

    Capt. Gary Been here awhile

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    I hauled a 400 lb bike from California to Alabama on a versa hauler with standard tiedowns never moved if you take your time loading and tie down it should be rock solid
  5. RossoLinea

    RossoLinea Been here awhile

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    My next update has taken me about six weeks with multiple trips back to the drawing board (or SolidWorks). This was a multi-part project so I will start at the beginning. As most of you know, the factory rack design is somewhat weak and can not handle much (if any) loads. I know there have been several people that have come up with some ingenious designs to support the factory rack (such as AZGSA), but it still was just a band aid to the basic design. I desided to start with a clean sheet of computer screen and design something different. I also wanted something clean that could be easily removed when not needed (I come from the high end sport bike world and just hate having anything on a bike that isn't needed). So, the design criteria lead me to first building an easily removable base support. This piece is attached under the passenger seat, located by pins, and can be easily removed by just lifting the passenger seat. The next part was a very sturdy triangulated section that would form the basis of the rack. By tying these parts together, I could create a very sturdy yet lightweight rack. I also wanted to keep in mind that this is a low-dollar (relatively speaking) bike and the design must incorporate efficient, value-based, components.

    As a side note, one thing that does bother me on a bike like this that will see off-road use (unless, of course, you are Landsurfer74 - cheers) is that the first thing to get damaged are the really expensive cases. So, I started with what I feel is a very well made, yet inexpensive case.

    Having said all of that, here is my latest iteration of the tail rack:

    him_rear_rack_1.jpg

    him_rear_rack_2.jpg

    him_rear_rack_3.jpg

    him_rear_rack_4.jpg

    Regards,

    Ken
  6. RossoLinea

    RossoLinea Been here awhile

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    Continued-

    Now that I had the tail rack and base mount designed, I moved onto the side cases. Again, the design criteria was that it had to be easy removed, with none or very minimal support brackets left in place. Additionally, I was looking for a smaller case as most of my riding is one day wandering (so I don't need to carry a lot of stuff, just the basics). I also wanted something that would tuck in tight to the bike to allow easier maneuvering. This design allowed the side cases to be attached with the tail rack and base support so the entire unit could be quickly removed with no tools.

    him_small_case_1.jpg

    him_small_case_3.jpg

    him_small_case_4.jpg

    him_small_case_5.jpg

    Regards,

    Ken
    voodoochilled, locrwln, azgsa and 4 others like this.
  7. RossoLinea

    RossoLinea Been here awhile

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    Continued (again) -

    And here are the larger bags for those times I may need the extra room. Again, the complete assembly can be easily removed from the bike without any tools and all that is left are two small brackets mounted under the seat. And keeping with the value-based build, all five cases (tail rack, two small side cases & two larger side cases) cost me less than $200.

    him_large_case_1.jpg

    him_large_case_3.jpg

    him_large_case_4.jpg

    him_large_case_5.jpg

    Regards,

    Ken
  8. rockt

    rockt Long timer

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    Amazing work, Ken. Your forward thinking is really impressive. To be honest, when I first saw the wide side plates, with only the top case, I didn't like the look and thought it wasn't in keeping with the aircraft quality of your other work. But as soon as I saw it with the side cases, especially the larger ones, it all came together. The fact that you can remove everything without tools is icing on the cake. Cheap too. Please keep these projects and reports coming.

    EDIT: just looked at the pics again - where are the rear turn signals?
    voodoochilled likes this.
  9. RossoLinea

    RossoLinea Been here awhile

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    Thank you for the kind words. As to the plain side plates, I've already added reliefs to the design that breaks up the slab sides (I just haven't fabricated the new version yet)..

    On my bike, the turn signals are incorporated into the license plate frame. But, I did design a separate bracket that would mount the stock turn signals if I ever decide to go that way.

    Regards,

    Ken
  10. Adrian V

    Adrian V Long timer

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    Very impressive Ken!
    I have a couple of comments if I could be so bold:
    Do the front of the side cases contact your rear end when standing and leaning back, say like when descending a steep slope?
    Given that the pillion seat seems redundant with this set up, did you give any thought to moving the rear carrier over the pillion seat?
    Why did you space out the larger side cases at the back; for aesthetics?
    It seems to me that the large exhaust must inevitably compromise the room available for side cases, have you given any thought to an alternative tail pipe?
    Please don’t take my comments as negative, your work is outstanding, I just feel that a smaller tail pipe would open up the space somewhat.
    Cheers,
    Adrian
  11. RossoLinea

    RossoLinea Been here awhile

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    No problem - please question away. I am 6'-1" and if I stand on the pegs (balls of my feet) and lean back so my arms are fully extended, I can just feel the case touch my calf. So no, not an issue.

    The pillion seat is fully functional - my wife fits fine. But, I am working on a cargo/tool box that would replace the pillion seat and allow even more storage.

    My personal design constraint was to mount the front of the bags no further forward than the pillion seat. Because of the size of the bags, I had to space them out to clear the tail rack so I just made them parallel with the bike (they are still inside the envelope of the handlebars).

    My intention with designing these cases/mounts was that I don't take multi-day trips (I know there are people that do and there are larger cases already available). I was just trying to be realistic in my uses. I like to carry some things with me when I ride but I don't want to take the large factory aluminum cases off road - they are too big and expensive - so this way I can easily adjust the size to my needs (tail case, small cases or large cases). In addition, if I damage a case off road, it is not a big financial hit.

    But, back to your question. The issue is to have an exhaust that is high enough to clear off road obstacles without damaging the case (or what is inside). In the past, I have seen first hand where someone has put a smaller muffler on an adventure bike and then melted a hole through the bottom of the case because the exhaust exited before the end of the case. In fact, I'm sure that is why the factory panniers stick out so far (so the exhaust does't damage the bottom of the case).

    In my riding, I enjoy having a smaller, more maneuverable bike like the Himilayan. As a reference, I've owned both a BMW GS1200 & a KTM 990 Adventure, both of which were too large for me to feel comfortable off road. I also have a BMW G650 X-Challenge which is great for my off road riding but I can't take anything with me.

    Regards,

    Ken
  12. Loadtoad101

    Loadtoad101 Been here awhile

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    Ken, your work looks fantastic. Any thought in selling the plans along with a parts list?
  13. azgsa

    azgsa Dude

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    Spent weekend wiring up the accessories. All the accessories go through a relay which turns on with the ignition, and all are fused. The AUX flood lights have a separate handlebar switch and are wired (with additional relay) to only come on if the high beams are on. This way if the AUX light switch is on, then the AUX lights can be turned on/off with just the high beam switch for ease on the highway (along with the high beam). I figure if I'm using the AUX lights then there probably isn't a time I don't want the high beam on anyway. It's worked out well on my other bikes.

    I usually use a fuse block for wiring up accessories but had individual fuse holders on hand and didn't want to spend too much a budget bike. The wiring diagram looks like this (paper copy goes in the owners manual on the bike for future reference):
    [​IMG]


    Labeled the fuse holders with silver sharpie pen. The main 30A accessory relay fits perfectly into a hole just to the starboard side of the airbox. All connections soldered and heat-shrinked.
    The under seat wiring looks like this:
    [​IMG]


    Made a little mount to hold the BMW style (Powerlet) socket on the side of the bike:
    [​IMG]


    Both the BMW style socket and the SAE connector (the dealer had installed) are wired directly to the battery (through a fuse) so they can be used to charge the bikes battery etc.
    [​IMG] ]
  14. Adrian V

    Adrian V Long timer

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    Hi Ken,
    Thanks for answering my questions so clearly, seems like you have it all covered :thumb.
    +1 to Loadtoad101’s comment, it would be great if some of your ideas (plans), or products could be made available, there would surely be a market.
    Cheers,
    Adrian
  15. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    USA Himalayans are all CA. spec. evap system. They can be wonky by not venting like they should one way so pressure builds in your gas tank when its parked and gas starts to fizzle out the gas cap key slot and when you start it up and the valve opens a slug of gas goes right down the vent line making it run rich when the throttle body draws vacume from the the eavp. They can be wonky the other way and not vent right when running and the fuel pump draws the tank down with no air allowed in to replace the fuel consumed the pump end up pulling weakly against a vacume. EFI fuel pumps are made to push and they're good at that. They aren't made to pull and they're lousy at that.
  16. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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  17. azgsa

    azgsa Dude

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    Want a CHEAP beeping LED compatible flasher? Takes 5 min or so to install. If the one you get doesn't have the correct little rubber mount piece on it (looks like they might have changed since I ordered mine) just take it off your old flasher.



    Less than US$2.00 shipped (from China to US) here. FYI: Site says it's LED compatible but I haven't used one with LED turns signals to verify.

    Hole where sound comes out of the flasher can be partially blocked if it's too loud for you.
    [​IMG]


    Flasher location behind right side panel:

    [​IMG]

    Kiwiscoot and Eatmore Mudd like this.
  18. Loadtoad101

    Loadtoad101 Been here awhile

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    Do you need two, one for left and one for right?
  19. azgsa

    azgsa Dude

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    Just one
    Loadtoad101 likes this.
  20. Loadtoad101

    Loadtoad101 Been here awhile

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    For areas that require spark arrestors for off road use, does the stock muffler qualify? I'm going to Calif and I know how aggressive the authorities are out there, lot's of tickets to fund the Gov't:(