Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. gavmac

    gavmac Long timer

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    May 27, 2007
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    1,219
    Location:
    Boonah, Qld, AU
    Harris Performance know a fair bit about frame building.
  2. Kiwiscoot

    Kiwiscoot Been here awhile

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    Feb 14, 2010
    Oddometer:
    770
    Location:
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    The filter has a coarse outer filter layer and an inner denser filter layer. The filter is really meant for air flow from the outside into the inside. The outer coarse layer acts as a dust pre-filter to take most of the dust and the inner finer layer to do the small particles. This is to prolong filter cleaning intervals. Running it in reverse like I do is not ideal, however it works. It still filters fine but the only thing to be aware of is to clean it more frequently. I have made Uni filters in the past from OEM filters and Uni foam, so that is on my list of things to do.
    Ok the verdict is out on this model of Uni filter. I have run a tank of gas through the bike since I fitted it.
    1.) more up and go, especially accelerating from 100 kph/65 mph up to 120 kph/ 75 mph.
    2.) bike was 10% lighter on fuel. Straight from the factory I used to get 25 km/l but that went down to 23 km/l when I got the bigger 130 mainjet and lifted the needle 0.7mm. Now with the Uni filter the fuel consumption is back at 25 km/l and the weather is cold now 5C / 41F in the mornings with city commuting so not really conducive to good mileage.
  3. BRIANPL

    BRIANPL Adventurer

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    Nov 5, 2018
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    Melbourne Australia
    Hi fLATLAND I have used a similar tool which i bought on ebay ,i had to shorten the handle , i found it really fiddly , i also bought a tiny open end spanner set which fits the 3mm ajuster it works really well.
    kitkat likes this.
  4. kitkat

    kitkat Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2003
    Oddometer:
    577
    Location:
    california
    I’m 6’ 2” and I felt ok on it. I recently cut the seat back so my butt sits back further and added 1” hard foam to the seat.

    It’s great But I now think I didn’t need to add the 1”. Just cutting the “back hump” back a couple inches would have made it fit well.

    I think a long 1 piece seat would be neat on this bike. That way the rider can scootch back if the needed to, sort of like you would on dirt bike.
    Tomocan, Samizdat, Bojer and 3 others like this.
  5. Toogzweire

    Toogzweire Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2018
    Oddometer:
    14
    Location:
    Flanders-Belgium
    Same here, same place and has 1900 kms (1100 miles).
    The dealer will have a look at it on Thursday.

    T
  6. chArj_Himalayan

    chArj_Himalayan Been here awhile

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    Aug 6, 2018
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    107
    Location:
    Indianapolis, IN
    Yep, I am pretty careful with O-ring Chains. Normally you can get away with Kerosene, but I stick with Maxima chain cleaner and chain wax, with a Stockton Grime Minister brush. That stuff works really well!
  7. chArj_Himalayan

    chArj_Himalayan Been here awhile

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    Is there a good write up/ video on performing the valve adjustments. I remember someone here posting up a service manual, does that include the valve adjustment guidelines?
  8. johnny42

    johnny42 Been here awhile

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    Sep 11, 2018
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    It's more intimidating than difficult.

    The manual will tell you all the preliminary step but once you get those done, simply remove the covers and insert the proper feeler gauge. If they're good, put the covers back on and ride till next scheduled check.

    If they need adjusting, loosen the lock nut, turn the adjuster with a tool of your choosing (I used needle nosed pliers) to get the correct gap, hold it in that position and tighten the locknut. Sometimes the adjustment moves when tightening the locknut so check again. Repeat as needed to get the correct gap. Reinstall the covers.

    I have never been able to find a video on adjusting the Himalayan valves.
  9. azgsa

    azgsa Dude

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    Location:
    Central Arizona
  10. RossoLinea

    RossoLinea Been here awhile

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    If someone would like to do the video work, I'll be happy to give a tutorial on the valve adjustment (or any other services).

    Regards,

    Ken
  11. fe2cruz

    fe2cruz Hermes the Himalayan

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2018
    Oddometer:
    57
    Location:
    Southern California
    I think I can get there next month, with oil, filter and video camera. Ken, I will message you with details closer to then. Been so busy, haven't been able to get much mileage up to 3K yet. Weeping seems to be stopped now that I tightened the bolts everyone mentioned. Front fork wobble went away too once I started holding the tank tight with my knees at higher speeds. It's like no matter how heavy you are the wind just pushes you up and away form the total sum center of gravity. Locking your core to the tank with your knees makes 80/85mph much more stable. As long as I use mostly coasting/momentum to keep me up there rather than using wide open throttle constantly I can still keep a respectable 65-75mpg. There isn't much power in 4th and 5th anyway. Rolling slow and coasting for a few minutes to warm up will help save a bit of mpg too. I was wasting a lot of gas before over revving still to warm up. The stock bike is actually not too loud, but I still feel bad whenever I start up in a cul-de-sac after midnight, so I try to roll out right away rather than sitting still and idling; warming up further away at stop lights. Getting past the break-in period may have helped increase the gas mileage too.
    All the short trips rather than long adventures have made me pull out the trickle charger though. Consecutive short trips just don't charge the cheap little battery enough.
    When I'm starting from my garage I usually jam the end of a plastic bungee hook to lock the bi-starter in place. This way I can put on my helmet gloves and jacket while the bike warms. Whether I do this or roll and coast for 5-10 minutes till I get to the highway, I can always avoid stalling. Without warming up for 5 minutes from a cold start my bike will stall at a light without a tiny extra throttle. I have had a few weird gear changes, but it's hard to tell if it's my lazy foot pushing on the gear selector ever so slightly or just quirks of the break-in. It doesn't happen much anymore though. These are all really such easy minor things that just naturally come up with such an analog bike. It really does teach you to ride differently. Rather than stop and take pictures or get stuck chatting to crowds of people curious about the bike you just gotta avoid the turn out and keep on riding. Keep on riding slow easy and fun at 70mpg on the highway or in the dirt. Steep Climbs might eat more mpg, but there's usually a slope you can coast down on afterward and even it all out.

    Samizdat likes this.
  12. kitkat

    kitkat Been here awhile

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    Oct 3, 2003
    Oddometer:
    577
    Location:
    california
    Those tools look great for demonstration purposes but they won’t fit when the engine is inside the frame!

    Also, his 3mm wrench looks like it has a lot of play in it.

    I think the DIY wrench made from a square drive deck screw is better!
  13. MrDralas

    MrDralas Super n00b

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2018
    Oddometer:
    632
    Location:
    North of somewhere
    I use the factory tool to adjust the valves while the engine is in the frame. It’s a tight fit on the intake side but it does work still, I’ll try and snap a few photos this weekend if I can get access to a garage.

    Anyone who’s changed their fork oil? What weight did you go with? The book says 2w/35, but I haven’t been able to find any around town, or am I just not thinking about it right and is that a range?
    voodoochilled likes this.
  14. RossoLinea

    RossoLinea Been here awhile

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    Jun 27, 2018
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    The proper fork oil is 10w with a viscosity range of 35 (from the factory owners manual).

    Regards,

    Ken
  15. MrDralas

    MrDralas Super n00b

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    Thanks Ken,

    Weird that my books says 2w, I’ll pick up some 10w and replace the oil this weekend hopefully.
    891145C0-CCE6-410C-B35F-8930BDFC0827.jpeg
  16. RossoLinea

    RossoLinea Been here awhile

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    Here is a copy (thanks Azgsa!)

    Himalayan_lubricants.JPG

    Regards,

    Ken
  17. justinope

    justinope Long timer

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    Lynchburg, VA
    I guess we got botched manuals, mine says the same as yours compared to the page above my post

    Also, has anyone made any headway towards cooling the bikes operating temperature down / heat emitted down? I'm assuming a EFI controller like PowerTRONIC or Power Commander could be mapped make it run slightly richer and likely cooler at the expense of gas mileage but that was my only idea. If I recall these bikes run right on the edge of too lean from the people who've dyno'd them. Just wondering because we're in the 90's now and its getting more noticeable

    Something else I noticed that was interesting this morning is I was going outside to mess with the hand guards I got, and I could hear a squealing sound like teapot boiling sorta sound, found it was coming from the gas cap. This is around 9-10am here when the temperate is steadily rising. I pushed on it and it stopped but I'm guessing its getting pressurized as it gets warmer but is it supposed to be letting that pressure out through the cap or should I check that vent hose under the tank?
    Samizdat likes this.
  18. Loadtoad101

    Loadtoad101 Been here awhile

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    Feb 28, 2017
    Oddometer:
    741
    Location:
    Livingston TN
    Having an issue with my front forks. When riding on rough road or hitting small pot holes, I hear a thunk when the forks are extended to their max. No issue on compression, but when the wheel assembly is completely extended is when I hear the thunk. Is this normal? I have 7K miles on it and I don't remember the bike doing that last year when I rode it hard. What do you all think?
  19. ChopperCharles

    ChopperCharles Long timer

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    Jun 7, 2006
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    Location:
    Durham, NC
    Should be rather normal. Not completely normal, but not unheard of. Assuming these are conventional damping rod shocks and not some kind of cartridge emulator, there will be a top-out spring between the damping rod and the bottom of the chrome fork tube. It's usually a rather weak spring, as it doesn't have to do much usually. Have you lowered the bike at all? This usually makes a noise when the spacer is shortened inside the fork tube, but some bikes are just more prone to it as well. (CX500 for instance).

    Charles.
  20. RossoLinea

    RossoLinea Been here awhile

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    Jun 27, 2018
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    SoCal
    Do you still have your Evap system connected? If so, the pressure should be relieved through the charcoal canister otherwise you may have pinched your vent line.

    If you did remove your Evap system, you may have pinched your vent line.

    Regards,

    Ken
    Richarde1605 likes this.