Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. justinope

    justinope Long timer

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    Lynchburg, VA
    Oh ok so either way basically it may be pinched if that is happening? It does still have evap
    Richarde1605 likes this.
  2. Loadtoad101

    Loadtoad101 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2017
    Oddometer:
    740
    Location:
    Livingston TN
    completely stock suspension
  3. azgsa

    azgsa Dude

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    Location:
    Central Arizona
    Steering head bearings aren't loose are they?
  4. kitkat

    kitkat Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2003
    Oddometer:
    577
    Location:
    california
    Custom pillion box!! Designed by me, and made by Dave on this forum. Thank you Dave!!

    [​IMG]
    I'm planning on painting it black outside and light gray inside.

    [​IMG]
    It's attached to the frame using the bolts from the rack (which I removed), and aluminum L-brackets that attach using the factory screws. The L-brackets are riveted to the box, and there is an aluminum plate riveted under the rear of the box. It leaned back slightly so I added the plate to make it level with the panniers.

    The front of the lid hangs over the to cover the seat pin that my son made for me. I also plan to replace those two OEM rack bolts with bolts that have a flatter head.
    [​IMG]
    Samizdat, Eatmore Mudd and Twizy like this.
  5. justinope

    justinope Long timer

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    that design looks really awesome, but my worry is I'm always ending up scooted back against the back seat and my tailbone bouncing along into metal sounds no bueno
  6. kitkat

    kitkat Been here awhile

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    That's why it's angled, but even with my ape length arms my butt doesn't scoot back enough to hit the box lid.

    I modified my seat too. It's 1" taller.
    Richarde1605 likes this.
  7. ADV_RYDER

    ADV_RYDER n00b

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    May 28, 2019
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    5
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    Indie
    Folks,

    This is my first post in this forum, pardon if posted incorrectly.

    Herez a short video I made on the relocation of the ambient temperature sensor to get more accurate reading. The factory location being very stupid design where probe directly faces the engine heat, the meter used to jump 8-10C easily when ridden in hot weather. My motorcycle being still under RE warranty, I wasn’t so keen on tampering factory wires to relocate the sensor near to the headlight (as suggested in some other post which is doing rounds of Himalayan forums everywhere). After having tested for about a week in varying ambient temperature, it seems to be spot on with just about 1-2C variation.

    Worked well for me, so thought to share...Happy riding

    Herez the vid:
    Grek, Ice_German, talmage and 5 others like this.
  8. Ricardo76

    Ricardo76 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2019
    Oddometer:
    11
    Location:
    Yorkshire
    Hey up! As they say here in northern England. I am here to ask for advice about replacing the battery on my Himalayan. The factory-supplied one has not failed as such but despite riding frequently I need to keep it topped up with my C-TEK charger and that gives me a bad vibe. When I go on holiday later in the year I don't want to be stranded.

    Can anyone tell me exact YUASA model (or other) I need to get?

    Looking on Ebay UK I have identified the following:

    YUASA MAINTENANCE-FREE 12v 8ah 120CCA-YTX9-BS ALS £35.89
    POWERLINE TX9BS (replaces TTX9-BS) £27.95
    JMT LITHIUM +133% CRANKING & 2.2kg LESS (upgrade for YUASA) £71.99

    Can anyone advise?
  9. Loadtoad101

    Loadtoad101 Been here awhile

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    Livingston TN
    I will check those tomorrow, thank you for the suggestion.
  10. millman84

    millman84 Been here awhile

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    NE OK
    There was a discussion on batteries back on page 426. The YUASA number for the himalayan is the YTX9 not the YTX9-BS. Lithium batteries are nice until it gets cold. You can get one to start the bike when it is cold but it takes time and amp/hours.

    I do have a WPS featherweight battery in my himma but forget witch one it is.

    PS If you have to let it sit for more than a week, disconnect the negative battery cable, these bikes do have some parasitic drain.
    Samizdat likes this.
  11. kitkat

    kitkat Been here awhile

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    Oct 3, 2003
    Oddometer:
    577
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    california
    FYI, the knipex pliers wrench size 150mm, opens up just enough to fit the big steering column bolt head.

    Mine hasn’t shown any hint of becoming loose but with that one wrench I’m ready for tightening ANY of the Himalayan’s hex head bolts.

    When someone here recommended it I thought it was crazy (expensive) but in reality it’s amazingly efficient and absolutely worth having on the bike!
    Matt TwoTired likes this.
  12. FredRydr

    FredRydr Danger: Keep Back 300 Ft.

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    When trying to turn a very tight hex, are the jaws pushing back and opening against your hand, or do the jaws lock somehow?

    Added: I found a video. I get the impression it would not be appropriate for higher-torque applications, but I'd like to try one.
  13. Ricardo76

    Ricardo76 Adventurer

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    Mar 17, 2019
    Oddometer:
    11
    Location:
    Yorkshire
    Many thanks but YTX9 batteries (ie: no BS!) don't seem to be available in the UK. It's BS everywhere you look! As for disconnecting the negative cable, I haven't yet been able to face digging my battery out. I got the supplying dealer to fit a charging lead. Godness me, I've never seen such a tightly-packed mess under a seat. Having heated grips and spotlights doesn't help, I guess.
  14. JustMikey

    JustMikey Been here awhile

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    Belgium
    Built for all roads, built for no roads.

    Check!

    20190605_105325.jpg
  15. Dune Pounder

    Dune Pounder n00b

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    May 18, 2019
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    5
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    Worldwide
    I've been emailing RE support with a question that you guys might be able to answer and they can't seem to give me a proper answer. Has anyone installed the official RE touring seat? If so, is there a height difference?

    I intend on lowering my Himalayan with the Metisse links and thought maybe changing the seat would make a difference.
  16. azgsa

    azgsa Dude

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    As I mentioned a few pages back, I bought an off-brand YTX9-BS on Amazon (which was a sealed battery) for US$22 and it fit perfectly. The YTX9 and YTX9-BS are same specs (size, amps, etc) if you look on Yuasa pages for each. The BS designation is described as 'fresh pack' which means (to them) it's shipped dry with an acid bottle (see page 8 here for that explanation, it also says on that page that YTX designates high performance AGM). My off-brand battery did not have an acid bottle, it was sealed. Also the Yuasa page for the YTX9 says it doesn't fit ANY bike they have on record, strange. Anyway, the BS nomenclature seems to mean very little if nothing (except maybe to Yuasa where if you look at one on Amazon it does have the acid separate).

    So, just get a YTX9-BS sealed battery, or as Vikingtazz posted in Feb this year: the recommendation of using a battery search for any year XR650L size (since the Hima is so new), which works.
  17. Leyprest

    Leyprest Adventurer

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    Apr 1, 2019
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    36
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    Lancashire
    When you go on the Yuasa UK website, you type in your reg number and it tells you what battery will fit your bike. Just tried it with the reg of my Himalayan and it says there are no available batteries to fit that model. So I'm not sure where people are getting the spec from for the YTX9. Maybe speak to the dealer, or email MotoGB direct and ask them.
  18. kitkat

    kitkat Been here awhile

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    Correct, they are not for high torque use, however, most of the torque specs are pretty low on most bikes, and for most in-the-field needs they will keep you going until you get to a garage.

    The steering bolt is a great example. You won’t ever want to carry a wrench that big on the bike but this little knipex 150 can fit that big bolt head and snug it up. Even if you have to snug it up every hour, you can, which will get you home!

    That’s the biggest bolt head on the bike!

    For the two axle bolts I would still use the proper wrenches but you should have those on the bike regardless! Aside from these it catches every other hex head on the bike.

    To me, it’s a must have item!!
  19. azgsa

    azgsa Dude

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    I was just looking at the Knipex pliers on Amazon, any reason why you chose the 6" over the 7.25"? Both would fit in most MC tool rolls and I thought the larger of the two would handle a few more jobs...
  20. kitkat

    kitkat Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2003
    Oddometer:
    577
    Location:
    california
    The 150mm (6”) is the smallest/lightest that still fits the biggest hex bolt on the bike. It also fits inside the OEM tool pouch.

    The next size up will give you more leverage, but is bigger than necessary for the bike.

    I ended up buying ALL the sizes up the 10”. That’s 5”, 6”, 7” and 10”.

    5” is tiny but I’m use it often on the bike instead of opening the bikes tool kit to get the 6”.

    6”, is just right for the bike, fits inside the OEM tool pouch, and can open to fit the largest bolt head.

    7”, is just right to keep in the vehicle or in the garage or house for pretty much any wrenching needs. No more searching for the right size wrench! But, a little bigger than needed for the bike!

    10”, is contractor size tool. Bigger than I expected. I’ll probably never use it.

    Once you realize how awesome these are you’ll want the 7” to have handy around the house/garage, but I think the 6” is the right size to carry on the bike!
    Eatmore Mudd and azgsa like this.