Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. johnny42

    johnny42 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2018
    Oddometer:
    229
    Location:
    New York
    Go here for the manual, part list, etc. https://www.royalenfieldowners.com/index.php?threads/owner-and-service-manual-links.63/
    Eatmore Mudd likes this.
  2. Kannonball 88

    Kannonball 88 Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2010
    Oddometer:
    217
    Location:
    Rockbridge County, Virginia
    Thanks mr tea, the video shows which circuit to add a switch to. I’m not too worried about warranty, I can do this without cutting wires so it can be removed if the bike ever goes to a dealer for warranty work. Doubtful that the bike will ever see a dealer as the closest one is 150 miles away.
    Beemerboff, I agree that ABS is a wonderful thing most of the time but if you ever ride a steep downhill switchback with loose gravel and or shale believe me, you will wish you could turn yours off. We live in the mountains and ride lots of unmaintenanced ( I think I just made up a word) fire roads and logging roads where you really do not want ABS.
    Randy, Eatmore Mudd and shearboy2004 like this.
  3. ScottFree

    ScottFree Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,079
    Location:
    Ill-Annoy
    Umm... perhaps I was not clear in my earlier post. The whole point of connecting an ABS-defeat switch by plugging it into the fuse socket is that you don't cut any wires or make any changes to the bike that can't be undone in seconds. When you go in for service or inspection, you would simply remove the plug from the fuse socket, replace it with the correct fuse, and have a 100% un-modified stock bike.

    Indeed, if I lived in a part of the world so uncivilized as to have inspections, I'd probably locate my ABS-defeat switch in the tank bag and run its wire up under the front of the seat, so the whole assembly would be removed before going in for service or inspection.
    kokomoto and Eatmore Mudd like this.
  4. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

    Joined:
    May 28, 2012
    Oddometer:
    4,166
    Location:
    Wet side of WA.
    Click on the links in my sig line : )

    Royal Enfield Himalayan Farkle fest and Aftermarket Parts index thread.
    Royal Enfield Himalayan Maintenance, Hacks, Chops ,Tips and Mods thread.
    Randy likes this.
  5. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

    Joined:
    May 28, 2012
    Oddometer:
    4,166
    Location:
    Wet side of WA.
    MXZ did up a nice switch & wire lead with an in line fuse that plugs into the ABS fuse slot in the fuse box back in post #3001
  6. Kiwiscoot

    Kiwiscoot Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2010
    Oddometer:
    769
    Location:
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    I have heard advice that if you are new to adventure riding then it's better to get a more off road biased tyre. It will give more bite and traction off road and help with the lack of off road experience, hence enhanced the riding pleasure.
    canterbury.jpg
    I would've struggled with the track conditions yesterday, mud, ruts, wet muddy grass and thick loose gravel with the Pirelli MT60s. It was so much more manageable with the Shinko E804/805 combo.
    canterbury 2.jpg
  7. Treebone

    Treebone Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2007
    Oddometer:
    263
    Location:
    Wellington, Nevada
    Kiwiscoot, your last photo is strikingly similar terrain to my area here in Nevada, believe it or not. Might be why the old timers named it Wellington. You sure got a leg up on the green part, however.

    I am a cheap SOB when it comes to tires. To price to replace the original Pirelli's was a shocker, prices vary widely online, but average about 250. US$ for front and rear (mounting them myself)
    I have used Shinko 705's on other bikes in the past, and they have been quite affordable, but at the moment the 120/90-17 size is sold out most everywhere I looked.
    I decided to try the Kenda 761, the price was dirt cheap, 94. bucks for front and rear, delivered. The reviews are a mixed lot, but after mounting them I found a lot of the reviews to be BS. They are a bit stiffer sidewall, but were not difficult to mount. They may be a bit of a challenge to repair in the field, but might resist
    a flat where a softer tire might not.

    As you can see in the picture, the MT60 original was not worn out at 2500 miles, but I did feel the traction on gravel was going down hill. I was noticing more break-away at gravel curves that I had ridden on before. Fairly predictable, but less confidence.
    For a "knobby" tire it was pretty quiet on the asphalt, and pretty good traction on the road, but I had a gut feel that it would be easy enough to improve on.

    Most of my riding is asphalt and some gravel, nothing really requiring a hero type tire. The smooth power delivery makes traction available by backing off throttle and letting it slog a bit.

    The jury is out on the Kenda's, but I think for the money they will be good for my riding style.

    Attached Files:

    Lefthand Hawk likes this.
  8. Kiwiscoot

    Kiwiscoot Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2010
    Oddometer:
    769
    Location:
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Looks good Treebone. They should be way better on the gravel. That is a sharp price,you are fortunate in the US will all the market competition. For what the Himma is those tires should perform just fine.
    The Shinkos were NZ$220 for the set which is dirt cheap as the other brands is that& more just for a back tire here in NZ. I had to go up in size at the back to a 130/80-17. Don't notice any side effects.
    Keep the shiny side up and the dark side down....
  9. MrDralas

    MrDralas Super n00b

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2018
    Oddometer:
    632
    Location:
    North of somewhere
    Well, another week by, closer to getting the Himalayan back. In the mean time I’ve scored my self some new transportation for the city I’m stranded in.
    D7F49D99-146A-408E-88AF-F2F2DBC2B637.jpeg
    It’ seems to be a bit more work to get around but atleast it still has only 2 wheels.

    Hopefully the engine turns up the 24th like they said and I can the bike back just in time for some snow that’s expected in Calgary.
    DCDB4D57-FF20-4C23-B343-566F28089F5C.png
    Mister_Dog and Eatmore Mudd like this.
  10. Kiwiscoot

    Kiwiscoot Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2010
    Oddometer:
    769
    Location:
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    At least that will keep you warm to some degree. :-)
  11. MrDralas

    MrDralas Super n00b

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2018
    Oddometer:
    632
    Location:
    North of somewhere

    Try your e804 in the snow yet? I have a new front one for me bike.
  12. Mister_Dog

    Mister_Dog Digging Under the Fence

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2018
    Oddometer:
    91
    Location:
    NY/PA Twin Tiers
    FYI, changed my tires out for the first time at 3,000 miles. Front rim strip snapped when handled (read: touched with a fingertip) and I replaced it with Gorilla tape. Should have heeded the implicit warning. Flat tire 10 miles from nowhere when the rear rim strip snapped. Only lost 9:00A to 1:30P but it was a lot of luck on my part as I wasn't packed for that kind of nonsense.
  13. Kiwiscoot

    Kiwiscoot Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2010
    Oddometer:
    769
    Location:
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    No our snow season is over for this year now, so that will be next year now. Will be interesting to hear your experience. Just looking at the E805 rear tire I would think it might be a bit skittish in snow. I've seen the Shinko 244 rear and that may be better in snow by the look of it. I think the E804 should be OK in snow.
  14. johnny42

    johnny42 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2018
    Oddometer:
    229
    Location:
    New York
    Has anyone used the Seat Concepts "standard" comfort seat? Seems like most get the "tall" option. Anyway, has anyone bought the standard seat? Does it make standing at a red light harder, or no change? They say the seat is wider, but is it also wider at the front when standing at a stop? If so, by much? Finally, with those with the standard seat, would you say it's more comfy and worth it?

    Is the bulk ordering still going to happen?
  15. FarklePilot

    FarklePilot Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2013
    Oddometer:
    413
    Location:
    Vancouver Island
    Originally had the standard seat. I'm 30" inseam... Then I rode my dealers with the tall. NO comparison. Ordered the tall right then. Way comfier, opens up the knees. Remember, you only put your feet down when COMPLETELY stopped right? Only need one down to stop a tip over...:augie
  16. KennyBooBear

    KennyBooBear Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2019
    Oddometer:
    395
    Location:
    Colfax, CA
    Well I had about a damn perfect birthday weekend with folks from my local riding group as well as just exploring around the mountains. I found a road/trail that would allow me to ride gravel all the way up to where my gal lives, so next weekend I may take that. All said and done, I rode 400ish miles this weekend, about 40 of which were off road in shale, loose gravel, on damp clay, over granite and with a bit of mud thrown in for good measure.

    IMG_20190921_095133.jpg

    IMG_20190921_104327.jpg

    IMG_20190921_113733.jpg

    IMG_20190921_142836.jpg

    IMG_20190922_155347.jpg

    IMG_20190922_165157.jpg

    IMG_20190922_165617.jpg

    I took the bike into Reno via. Henness Pass Rd. and had Euro Cycle Reno look at my ignition switch issue (same issue many others have had with it being a bit finnicky at switch on) and they're gonna warranty it which is nice. Came back into the Tahoe area over Mt. Rose just in time for the sun to settle as I pulled into Olympic Valley. It's definitely starting to feel like Fall up here with night time temperatures in the 30s and even high 20s Fahrenheit at times. Gotta keep taking advantage of the riding season while it lasts!
  17. 0xsergy

    0xsergy Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2019
    Oddometer:
    37
    Location:
    Hamilton
    You're clearly not on the right trails then bud. :p I just had to go down a trail sideways with my rear locked up in the rut due to a steep descent. Not sure how that would have worked out with abs, could have been unpredictable.

    Has anyone here looked into sourcing levers? I wonder if ours match some other production bike. Some folding ones would be nice
    KennyBooBear likes this.
  18. Kiwiscoot

    Kiwiscoot Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2010
    Oddometer:
    769
    Location:
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    look at the link in my signature for aftermarket parts.
    Eatmore Mudd likes this.
  19. Kiwiscoot

    Kiwiscoot Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2010
    Oddometer:
    769
    Location:
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    The Himma in it's element. river.jpg
    Such a great gravel bike.
  20. Kiwiscoot

    Kiwiscoot Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2010
    Oddometer:
    769
    Location:
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    A wonderful adventure on a Himma two up.
    Eatmore Mudd and rmattrpdx like this.