Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. 0xsergy

    0xsergy Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2019
    Oddometer:
    37
    Location:
    Hamilton
    ? I'm not seeing a signature my man, sorry.
  2. Kiwiscoot

    Kiwiscoot Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2010
    Oddometer:
    769
    Location:
    Christchurch, New Zealand
  3. chelmi_ouest_coast

    chelmi_ouest_coast Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2018
    Oddometer:
    83
    Location:
    French Atlantic coast, south Brittany
    Here it is, I have a Himalayan
    First day on his handlebars, 552.8 km after 15 hours of small roads at once, with a break of course.

    Royal_Enfield_Himalayan_recuperation_21092019_n01.jpg

    Royal_Enfield_Himalayan_recuperation_22092019_n02.jpg
  4. KennyBooBear

    KennyBooBear Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2019
    Oddometer:
    395
    Location:
    Colfax, CA
    As is the case with any vehicle, it's usually contingent on the dealer.

    In my case, the dealer I use is pretty cool and their primary focus is Ducati, Triumph, Zero, MV Agusta and Aprilia. The RE business side is a recent addition. Since they're a more performance oriented shop, they're super cool about modifications made to the bike. I was there this weekend and warranted my ignition issue despite the slip-on exhaust, ABS switch, and when mentioned, they recommended a local guy that does performance stuff for RE. When asked if an ECU piggyback would void my warranty for things like the seeping head or a failed stator, they indicated as long as there was nothing blatant that showed the engine grenaded due to a terrible map, that they were cool with it.

    That said, I've also heard of dealers that look for the slightest excuse to void your warranty.
    fe2cruz and shearboy2004 like this.
  5. 47025

    47025 I just have to ride

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2019
    Oddometer:
    280
    Location:
    South Eastern Indiana
    Nice southern Indiana evening ride. Bridge is at Yorktown.

    DSCF1814.jpg
  6. rpiereck

    rpiereck Enjoying my Himalayan

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2015
    Oddometer:
    278
    Location:
    South Korea
    365 mile on the Himalayan this weekend. 8 hours on the saddle total riding time.

    I took off from El Paso right after 8 am, with full belly and full tank. Braved the immense monotony of US54 heading north towards Alamogordo. From there I headed uphill on Franklin National Forest and took a 20 mile loop through a dirt road, lots of gravel, loose rocks, light mud, and plenty of up and downhills. The Himalayan takes it all very well, utilizing the most of its first and second gear.

    At Cloudcroft I stopped to refuel, then north to Ruidoso, where the Golden Aspen Bike Rally was happening. I just ate lunch at a park, then rode right through the town and headed to Monjeau Peak, which is 9640 feet tall and accessible via a 6 mile long unpaved road. At the top of the peak there is a historical fire lookout made of rocks and cement that provides beautiful views in every direction. From there I went downhill then back uphill towards Buck Mountain, over 10000 feet tall, accessible via 12 miles of paved road and 1 mile unpaved. The unpaved section was closed today, so I just turned around and went back downhill.

    A quick bite in Ruidoso filled my belly for a few more hours, then I rode off the mountains and into the desert valley again. In Tularosa I had to do a detour around the town due to an accident, which led me through 2 miles of red dirt road. Back to Alamogordo I again braved US54 heading South, stopping for gas once more in Oro Grande.

    The bike did great, it gobbles miles quite well, albeit slowly. My right hand kept on getting tired so a better throttle lock is needed...

    At the top of El Paso's Transmountain oad on the way out of town, around 8:30 am. Grey clouds were everywhere and threatening to make me wet, but they dissipated by the afternoon.
    70832819_423595531694324_9100006411311513600_n.jpg

    Riding a dirt road through Lincoln National Forest, the Himalayan did formidably well, this bike feels at home in the dirt.
    71186905_423595628360981_8172505947407646720_o.jpg 71214446_423595708360973_4028788471651893248_n.jpg

    Stopped in Ruidoso for lunch, I had packed my own food. There was a biker rally in town and pirates where everywhere, riding with frowns on their faces. And I thought people rode motorcycles because they enjoyed it!!
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    At the top of Monjeau Peak, where there is a historical fire lookout, built almost a hundred years ago. The structure is made of rocks and cement and the 5.5 mile dirt road leading to it was fun, and quite steep at the end. Video below.
    70913327_423595911694286_4716568445485842432_n.jpg 70853312_423596005027610_3930665910800482304_n.jpg 70825820_423596108360933_4967973192221065216_n.jpg

    Out of the mountain and it was time to fill up my belly. I wasn't hungry for too much food, so a quick bite from gas station snack was perfect, next time I better pack more food.
    70538402_423596525027558_3393228844801458176_n.jpg

    365 miles in a day on the Himalayan was almost excessive, despite he fact that the bike performed admirably and wasn't really uncomfortable. The biggest issue was my right wrist started feeling the pain of hours of vibration on the sixth hour in. A better throttle lock is called for. At highway speeds, 70 to 75 mph, the bike did around 53 mpg. On the slower sections it averaged 65 to 72 mpg.
    70769070_423596585027552_680927817369649152_n.jpg 70514935_423596628360881_3206002484405338112_n.jpg

    Riding my bike on the final mile of the climb towards Monjeau Peak, with its mountain lookout, near Ruidoso, New Mexico. The road was graded but pretty steep, also rocky and with loose gravel in a few places. The Himalayan did well despite the low power, as its engine is quite torquey. I stayed mostly in first and second gear, occasionally going to third, and made to the top of the 9640 foot peak easily.
  7. drdubb

    drdubb OFWG Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,387
    Location:
    Durham, North Carolina
    love this
    photo
  8. drdubb

    drdubb OFWG Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,387
    Location:
    Durham, North Carolina
    Love ride reports...thanks for posting your texas wanderings.
    rpiereck likes this.
  9. johnny42

    johnny42 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2018
    Oddometer:
    229
    Location:
    New York
    LIke you, I have to ride quite a ways to get to anything interesting. It's the dues you have to pay for adventure. Nice report and great video. I noticed you edited out the 10 mph, 180 degree curve on the way up. Those tight curves on loose stone can be stressful.
  10. Hondapaul

    Hondapaul Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2019
    Oddometer:
    100
    Location:
    Ipswich UK
    Hi All
    Don't know if anyone else finds it the same but the gear lever sticks out to far for how my feet sit on the pegs - Had planned to just put the lever in a vise and straighten it out a bit.
    But looking on Flebay there was an auction for a KTM 390 Duke lever... looked really nice and at a breakers only 30 miles from me... so I trundled over to have a look... lever is the same lenght as original... and it is now on the bike.

    The original lever boss uses a 10mm shouldered bolt and the dual bearing pivot of the KTM lever uses std 8mm. So for the moment/testing it is just bolted throught the threaded hole using washers for support...

    I had to swap over the rod end on the new lever as Enfield do their left/right the other way round - but thats a 2 second job to swap.

    Short trip today, as out later, and all seems good but different (no slop in gearchange). will do a longer ride tomorrow to see if it stays on there... Peg section screws in so on the lookout now for a folding tip for it.

    As a note i dissmissed a China lever as unsure of quality but looking at actions for them the "stub" that the rod end scfrews into looks a lot wider/thicker on the original KTM job... and will tidy up / better adjuster as not mant threads into rod ends once happy with it.

    Would have liked to use the KTM output shaft piece as it is very nicely made... but KTM must use a slightly smaller output shaft.

    IMG_20190924_165506.jpg
    IMG_20190924_165511.jpg
    Bojer, rpiereck and Eatmore Mudd like this.
  11. 0xsergy

    0xsergy Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2019
    Oddometer:
    37
    Location:
    Hamilton
    Only need one unless you're hanging over a ditch cause you're an idiot like me and picked a bad place to stop
    That hasn't been an issue since my first encounter with a plugged front fender, bent nicely to a perfect position along with my left handlebar.

    I added a front dust guard to the bottom bearing seal after a good cleaning. It's not pretty but I want to see if it helps before I do it proper. New cheapo bars on there, feels great to have good steering again.

    Attached Files:

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  12. rmattrpdx

    rmattrpdx Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2017
    Oddometer:
    44
    Location:
    Portland, Oregon, USA
    Has anyone taken accurate measurements of the stock handlebar geometry? (or is it documented somewhere?...). Searching the thread didn't yield anything, but my search terms may have fallen short... Figured I'd ask before busting out on my own.
  13. 0xsergy

    0xsergy Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2019
    Oddometer:
    37
    Location:
    Hamilton
    CR High bend seems to be very similar, that's what I bought after a recommendation in here somewhere. They are about 1.5" longer, I didn't bother cutting them down. Cables do fit but I've rearranged my stock wire harness so I can't guarantee it will be without work.
    rpiereck likes this.
  14. sqeeezy

    sqeeezy Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 12, 2019
    Oddometer:
    425
    Location:
    Southern Spain
    Looks nice; I've dickered about with the lever to try to make it easy for my very pronate left foot, inside ligaments stretched and weak: I got bored of missing up-changes and hearing big revvy noises and have adopted the dangerous habit of hoicking the lever up with my heel. Not advised, kids. I only do it cos I'm expendable. I might tadge together a heel n toe lever as my left foot gets on with them.
    Eatmore Mudd likes this.
  15. Mister_Dog

    Mister_Dog Digging Under the Fence

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2018
    Oddometer:
    91
    Location:
    NY/PA Twin Tiers
    Owie. Farewell Angelica.

    Last night I t-boned a suicidal deer at ~3600 miles, and ~45 mph.

    I walked away from it, barely, due to first rate PPE. Spent the night in the ED. Still a mass of pain, but my only broken bone is my left pinkie toe.

    The deer died instantly, and, I imagine, so did the bike. I haven't seen it or called the insurance adjuster, but given the nature of the accident I'm not going to resist them totaling the bike.

    Planning on getting another Himi but I'm gonna have to ride without foot controls for a while, so probably not replacing the bike until spring. =( I'll post a getoff report in faceplant once the accident report is settled. Hopefully I can get the investigation pics of the bike and deer dead in a ditch. I obviously was not super into photography after lawn darting.
  16. rpiereck

    rpiereck Enjoying my Himalayan

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2015
    Oddometer:
    278
    Location:
    South Korea
    That was New Mexico! Much nicer than Texas.

    The curve was fine, but when I got to it there was a Tahoe struggling, going low (you can see the Tahoe uphill in the beginning of the video), I had to stop two or three times to wait for the Tahoe to get out of the way, and those are the parts I edited out. On that hairpin I stopped right on the elbow, moved the bike into position, and when the Chevy was out of the way I continued up.
  17. rpiereck

    rpiereck Enjoying my Himalayan

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2015
    Oddometer:
    278
    Location:
    South Korea
    Same Geometry as a CR High handlebar, I installed the one from Trackside, now for same for $45 on Cycle Gear. The Trackside handlebar is almost 2 inches wider than stock so you gain a little bit extra control with it too:
    https://www.cyclegear.com/parts/tra...t95RQVzIhq_FgwLNFvtEgh4Ya8nXwjtEaAtedEALw_wcB
  18. rpiereck

    rpiereck Enjoying my Himalayan

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2015
    Oddometer:
    278
    Location:
    South Korea
    Damn, sorry to hear that! At least you survived, which is what matters!
  19. MrDralas

    MrDralas Super n00b

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2018
    Oddometer:
    632
    Location:
    North of somewhere
    Sorry to hear about your crash, glad to hear your mostly ok. Sucks about the bike, but it’s replaceable fairly easy, people are less replaceable for the most part.

    Left foot, shift foot? Seems like some-a-body needs a hand shifter to sort out the no use foot.

    The stretch ligaments foot guy could also do that...or well heel toe, like he said.
  20. CDRODA396

    CDRODA396 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2018
    Oddometer:
    82
    Location:
    North Carolina, USA
    Just wondering, was it a Seat Concepts Tall Seat, or other brand? Thanks in advance!
    rpiereck likes this.