Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. drdubb

    drdubb OFWG Supporter

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    I've had mine about three weeks, only done 100 miles. This engine makes all kinds of storage noises, so I don't even know what to pay attention to. Guess I'll just keep riding till something i can't ignore pops up. I've been paranoid about all my motorcycles. They all make noises I can't explain.
  2. drdubb

    drdubb OFWG Supporter

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    I just watched a video about chain lubes from Fort Nine. Pretty good comparison. The gist of what I learned is that chain lube keeps the chain from rusting and provides very little in terms of actual chain lubrication. So let the argument begin.
    shearboy2004 and Retro Iron like this.
  3. Richarde1605

    Richarde1605 Long timer

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    True for sealed chains.
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  4. Retro Iron

    Retro Iron Been here awhile

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    Yes indeed. This is my second Enfield and while the Himma is light years ahead of any previous generation of RE, it still exhibits the same “character” as it growls and squeaks its way to warm-up. Kind of cool once you get used to it.

    In a weird sort of way... (I still can’t quite envision what’s in the little beast that could even make some of those noises):hmmmmm
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  5. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    Yes, and no gloves and flip-flops. All the necessary safety equipment in India.
  6. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    While we where at it we also did the middle stand which is notorious for breaking off. I am on my no. 3 now. If one only re-welds the hinge that will break even faster again so a big support triangle was put in place. That should solve it!



    .
  7. alexdf

    alexdf Adventurer

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    Offtopic
  8. Steve Rice

    Steve Rice Been here awhile

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    Funny, I've been considering just removing the center stand. People complain about the ground clearance being good except for the center stand. Sounds like an easy fix and you lose some weight as well.:clap
  9. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    well, I use the center stand quite a bit. while doing any work on the bike, packing it up for long trips, oiling the chain and on questionable surfaces.
    btw: the new 650 GT comes without one - although you can order it as add-on.
  10. Burcotbiker

    Burcotbiker Adventurer

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    I have had mine just a couple of days and only done 30 miles so far but I must admit it does make a few funny noises especially when cold. I had just put this down to being new and thought it would go as the bike beds in. I have a question about the running in, the manual gives the max speeds in each gear for the first 300 miles and then afterwards until it's fully run in but it's almost impossible to keep to these accurately. I was just not taking it over 3000 rpm, I would like to hear other people's views on running in especially the first 300 miles as it's torture trying to stick to 40 mph max and also trying not to let the engine labour. I plan on keeping the bike long term and want to make sure I run it in correctly.
  11. Beemerboff

    Beemerboff Long timer

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    To get the bike on to the centre stand I run the front wheel just onto a bit 30 mm paving slab, then give the centre stand a bit of a prod , and let the bike roll roll back off the paver and it just pops up onto the stand.
    Just a little movement and a little extra height make a big difference.
    I broke the end pad off the stand on my BMW F650 trying to raise it with brute force and ignorance, so I didn't try the same on the Hima.

    As for running in, most every manufacturer has different instructions, so only one opinion matters, and that is the one from the folks who made the bike and know the finishes and tolerances they used.
    It will have running in oil in it, so make certain you get it replaced at the 500 mile service, and I would get a magnetic drain plug and get them to fit it at the same time.
    Read somewhere the plug is 14 mm x 1.25mm thread but someone might confirm that if they have fitted one.
  12. Burcotbiker

    Burcotbiker Adventurer

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    I have searched the forum with no results but I wondered has anyone fitted or considered any type of tail tidy ? I saw one on a customized version which moved the number plate including holder and plate light up onto the rear mudguard doing away with lower part. In my opinion it made the rear look neater, I am not sure if it causes the rider to get covered in crap though ?
  13. drdubb

    drdubb OFWG Supporter

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    I’m still on the 300 mile part of the break in period too. I just try to keep it under 3000 rpm, vary the speed, let it warm up good before riding, don’t lug the engine. Fort Nine has a good YouTube video on break in methods. I ride around the neighborhood 10-15 miles couple of times a week.
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  14. mr tea

    mr tea Been here awhile

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    Question. Just had our first of proper rainstorm for 6 months in Southern England. I didn't get caught out in it but looking at the standard material seat cover it doesn't look like its waterproof at all. Is it waterproof or not?.
  15. Burcotbiker

    Burcotbiker Adventurer

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    That's exactly what I am doing, sticking to small local roads up to 40mph. I have quite enjoyed it as I am seeing local places I haven't seen for years. Thanks for the link I will check it out. Also I didn't realise that run in oil was different and the magnetic plug is a good idea but I would have thought these would have been fitted as standard anyway.
  16. ScottFree

    ScottFree Been here awhile

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    Following up on the reports of luggage rack failures... I took one look at the thing and concluded I would have to replace it with something (a) more robust and (b) bigger. The stock item seems to have been designed for nothing larger or heavier than a six-pack cooler. One of my first projects was coming up with a replacement for the stock rack--and, in the process, integrating appropriate luggage for both camping trips (where I need a big, flat space to lash down tent, sleeping bag, cot, etc.) and motel trips (where I want both a lockable compartment to store "bike stuff" like raingear, helmet, etc., and some kind of detachable containers for stuff that goes into the room each night). So here's a report on what I did.

    Before going any further, I should note that while my Himalayan replaced an R1200GS with the usual high-end accessories (Touratech stainless crash bars, Happy Trails aluminum luggage, etc.), these things had been added by a previous owner. My approach to accessories is more in line with the KLR650 I owned before the GS--a bike where "high-end accessory" means a milk crate that's the same color as the rest of the bike. So I set about this project with the intent that it be cheap, cheap, cheap, preferably making use of stuff I already had around the garage. Began with a quick inventory... let's see... Ortlieb Dry Bag saddlebags that I've owned since 2001 and used on my Buell M2 and KLR; pair of Harley Softail saddlebag support loops; a Plano Molding "Sportsman's Box" that would easily hold a full-face helmet and a cooler at the same time, has sturdy latches and provisions for securing the lid with a pair of padlocks; a four foot by nine inch aluminum extrusion that would make a fine luggage rack; a foot or so of angle stock left over from a luggage rack repair on the Road King; some flat aluminum that had once been part of a "load limit" sign; a can of flat black Krylon; some scraps of 3/8" thick polypropylene cutting board (also known as plastic stock); and miscellaneous nuts, bolts and wires (including the fasteners that held the stock rack to the bike). Sounds like an appropriate set. Let's get to work...

    Step one was coming up with structural support for a luggage rack and the Ortlieb bags. This required the biggest expenditure of the project, for a three-foot piece of 1.25" cold-rolled steel angle, two spacers (a whopping $1.65 each!) and a couple long M6 bolts. Luckily I had a $5 off coupon for the hardware store! After a little measuring and mocking up, I cut the three-foot angle in half, attached the Softail saddlebag supports to each section, and secured these assemblies (using the long M6 bolts and spacers) to the frame lugs that had attached the original rack. The angle stock that was already laying around became a cross member, secured to the frame through a couple "spacers" (1/2" nuts, happened to be just the right height) using the same holes as the original rack... and the Allen bolts that had secured the front of the rack to the frame.

    C82A2896-4A84-438C-98B9-7E53264FA7ED.jpeg

    Slotting and bending the ends of the rails allowed the "trafficators" (I do love Enfield's term for turn signals) to be relocated. The white plastic is there to protect the back of the bags, and to give a smoother handle for lifting the bike onto the center stand. Looks good--paint it flat black and call it "tactical."

    Next step, the taillight: I re-used the stock item, tracing the cut-out in the stock mounting bracket onto a piece of flat aluminum that already had a 90 degree bend. Bolt that to the rails, creating a rear cross member. Now I just had to extend the wiring, wrap it up neatly in convoluted plastic tubing ("snake skin") that I'd bought for a project on the BMW a couple years ago, and there... all framed up and ready for a luggage rack.

    62126CA1-C127-4CA2-8DFE-B23E660C8AE5.jpeg

    Notice the sensor for the dashboard thermometer is relocated to under the rack. I was hoping this would give more accurate readings, but it's still a pretty consistent 8 degrees (F) high. Guess I'll have to move it to the front of the bike.

    I debated on which side of the extrusion would go up--the finned side (which I could drill to provide bungee-cord attachments) or the flat side (which would fit a trunk better). Finally went with the latter. Sculpted it a bit for aesthetics (on a Himalayan?), and attached some rubber edging that I think was once part of the window trim on my old Buick:

    8E4E7E62-E9F6-4DD2-8F7F-97BFC070EC42.jpeg

    I cut a couple slots in the end of it to secure my ROK straps, made four holes and bolted it to the supports using four captive nuts (which also provided convenient attachment points for zip-ties that secured the taillight and turn signal wiring. Given the astronomical cost of metric hardware at my local store, I went with SAE fasteners here... but to avoid having to carry additional tools, I went with sizes that are very close to metric heads--in this case, 1/4" button-head Allen screws, which are a perfect fit to the 5mm wrench that's already in my tool kit (1/4" hex-head bolts are a perfect fit to an 11mm wrench, by the way). And there it is:

    A2CE49ED-33AE-444A-8D64-13D682EEED28.jpeg

    Rear view, showing the nifty extrusion:

    E9D790C3-4928-47B1-BA9F-C451B6BAAD8A.jpeg

    Now for the "trunk," a big ol' Plano Molding box. I ran one of these on the KLR, and later on the GS. They're big, sturdy, and cheap. The latches hold well, though I also rigged up a couple straps to keep the lid from flying off if I forget to latch it down. And there are holes for up to four padlocks.

    D31E624F-2A75-4A60-A0B8-3050E80260F1.jpeg

    The bungee-cord net is secured to the trunk lid with four plastic posts that used to hold a cargo net inside the trunk of my wife's Pontiac; I salvaged them when we junked that car. Handy place to park a jacket when riding on a hot day.

    So far I've taken the bike for one 50-mile shakedown of the camping configuration, with no trunk, all my camping gear on the pillion and rack, and a simulated load in the saddlebags. With cold weather closing in (and that hip still a problem), I don't expect to do an actual camping trip till spring, but the shakedown ride (which included about 10 miles of gravel roads) was encouraging. I hardly even noticed the load back there. Last weekend I did a 470-mile round trip to Wisconsin (described a few pages back), with full saddlebags, sleeping bag/pillow on the pillion (along with a cane; I'm still recovering from hip replacement), and raingear/heavy gloves/cooler/water bottle/etc. in the trunk. So far, the setup works well. The right bag sits about an inch from the muffler (no problems with melting/burning or cooking contents), the trunk feels secure, and best of all the bike doesn't seem to have gotten light up front from the additional load.
  17. ScottFree

    ScottFree Been here awhile

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    The Himmas we rented in Montana this summer sat outside overnight in the rain, and we got caught in an absolute gully-washer rainstorm near Bozeman, and in neither case do I remember a wet butt the following morning, so I'm thinking the seats are as waterproof as any motorcycle seat. The material looks like a fake (vinyl-derivative) suede, so while it looks porous it's probably not.
    mr tea and Eatmore Mudd like this.
  18. MrDralas

    MrDralas Super n00b

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    Chain tensioner is super easy to check, and is part of the service interval. I thought mine might have been making noise but it was Marbles in the engine from the rotor.

    I used a hand stapler to put mine together, I had to push down on the plastic really hard but other then that it worked fine.

    I don’t remember why I quoted you, but it seems you have it diagnosed and are getting it figured so that’s awesome.

    My Center stand is forsure what hits and hangs up on stuff when in the woods. I was log hopping(don’t know if correct term) and there was a few that the Center stand stopped me dead and I had to saw the log out the way to continue on.

    I finished running my second engine in on Sunday day, all last week was cold and not fun (30’s) i just started let it run till it would idle then go drive around in stop go traffic so it would get a constant vary in Rpms and gears.
    After an hour or so(tired clutch hand) I’d take a break get a coffee let the engine cool off(does this quick when there’s ice one stuff) then do it over again. It was a very lame and cold few days doing that, but atleast I missed a snow storm that chased me from Alberta to Colorado. Would have been better if I made it all the way to Houston but the bike died 600 miles short, mega lame.
    Now it’s at the local dealer getting sorted to see what’s wrong (fuel staving feeling then no running) and we will go from there.
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  19. ScottFree

    ScottFree Been here awhile

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    In over forty years, almost a million km, and around twenty bikes, I can't say I've ever owned one that was free of weird and ominous noises. The KLR came close with its liquid cooling and huge gas tank, but there was still the noise from the "doohicky," which always struck terror into the owner's heart (even if it was upgraded). The Himalayan doesn't seem to make an unusual amount of mechanical noise--no worse than my R1200GS (air cooled), and a whole lot quieter than my Suzuki GT500 Titan (500cc two-stroke twin)--that bike's crankcase sounded like it was full of rocks, the cylinder fins rang like a bell, and the exhaust was like a pair of 250 pound mutant radioactive bees from a Godzilla movie. Of course it was as reliable as a brick!

    If you want a bike that’s almost completely free of mechanical noises, check out a Triumph Street Scrambler. I demo’d one of those a while back, and all I could hear was the mellow exhaust and a very faint gear whine. Delightful! But easily twice the cost of a Himma!
    Beemerboff likes this.
  20. Kiwiscoot

    Kiwiscoot Been here awhile

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    Sorry to hear your bike woes are still not over.

    How do you check the tensioner? do I need to remove it from the engine with the risk of damaging the gasket then oil leak? or can I just remove the silver hex bolt at the back of the tensioner?