Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. ScottFree

    ScottFree Been here awhile

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    Considering Saturday and Sunday were in the 50s, I’m glad I spent rainy Saturday inside a vehicle and under a roof! I don’t envy your getting so wet! How much water did you have to drain out of your Himma’s engine, anyway?
  2. Steve Rice

    Steve Rice Been here awhile

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    Looks like a memorable weekend. Thought I was going to flood my bike out right after I got it heading down a water covered road in to work. Got soaked to the knees.

    I see you have Minnesota plates. Do you just live along the river? Your videos seem to be mostly in Wisconsin. Have you riden the trans Wisconsin trail? I'm thinking of giving it a go come spring. I'm over in Des Moines. Figured it wouldn't be to far to the start.
  3. CDRODA396

    CDRODA396 Adventurer

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    D151B39F-745B-44F3-B0FD-981C9137E0C3.jpeg
    DB5EA922-749F-42A3-B71C-77BC5FBC35F7.jpeg
    I (6’2”) have the tall, (first pic) wife (5’6’) the standard (next pic). Did 207 miles in central/western NC in the saddle today and both of us LOVE the comfort over stock. I have ridden both and currently prefer hers. Hers has a “butt bucket,” unfortunately, its hard to see, but the tall is still slightly sloped forward. After this trip I intend to have an auto upholstery shop try and maintain as much height as possible, but still level it up and give it the “shelf” hers has.
    Eatmore Mudd likes this.
  4. Steve Rice

    Steve Rice Been here awhile

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    Thanks, I'm 5'10" with a 30" inseam so have been leaning towards the standard. I don't mind the stock seat other than the forward slope. I found on long rides, if I sit straight down on the back with the pilion as a lumbar pad it doesn't feel bad. But alot of the time I feel pushed towards the tank. The standard looks a bit like the Corbin as far as contouring.

    Curious what the bags are on her bike. I'm also still debating between hard and soft panniers. Decisions decisions.
  5. mb8

    mb8 One planet, no option.

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    Perfect answer. (and thanks for all the other replies)

    I like ALL bikes and would have 1 of each if I could :) Have though about a Royal Enfield many times.
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  6. Doctor T

    Doctor T Gruppy old git

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    After my previous post regarding the service and finding out that the engine needs to be stripped down to find the knocking, i noticed that i had been charged for Rock oil fully synthetic oil. I questioned this as in the book it states semi synthetic oil. The mechanic showed me an updated memo from ER UK stating that only fully synthetic oil is now only to be used in the Himalayan.
  7. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    Question for the break experts here:
    In 2016 when I went on my first Ladakh trip with the Himalayan I bough 2 sets of spare break pads which I forgot about. Just found them deep inside the tools bag and they got a bit dirty and rusty as the plastic packing has been ripped open over time. Is there a shelf life for such tings? Is the surface deteriorating from time and humidity? Obviously looks are irrelevant but what about function?

    -sam
  8. Coopdway

    Coopdway Curiouser Supporter

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    It was wet and the forecast prepared us for that part. As you mention, the windy cool wet riding was not what we were willing to do all day. The bike runs but I’m still finding water (no minnows) in places I’m surprised at. At coffee in Mpls this morning, then GoMoto to get air and more oil filters. The process will be featured soon in a new Post.

  9. Coopdway

    Coopdway Curiouser Supporter

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    We’re right next to the river outside of Red Wing so I spend most of my riding in SE MN and SW WI. First time on the Trans Wisc was on my TW200. I had been at the WI Guzzi Rally so started at the Illinois line. Went half way that weekend then later did the north half. We ride sections of the Route all the time, the KLR did the north half a few years ago. Annually we ride parts of it , especially the northern 1/3.

    Do it.

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  10. ScottFree

    ScottFree Been here awhile

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    Far as I know, brake pads have an unlimited shelf life. I’ve used NOS pads that were over ten years old without incident. Don’t see any difference between storage and use (if anything, use should be harder due to heat and water exposure), and right now the front pads on my 2004 Road King are still original and work fine (my 2006 GS was still on original front pads when I sold it in July).

    I remember back in the days of “organic” brakes (wood chips and camel dung, given how poorly they worked), they’d tell you to sand them now and then to restore the surface. But this wasn’t about age; it was because they glazed so easily.

    Brush off the surface rust and run ‘em.
    sam2019 likes this.
  11. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    thanx, I had similar thoughts. You sure dont break a lot - in comparison my 2001 R1100 is on her second set of disks ...
  12. Doctor T

    Doctor T Gruppy old git

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    Over time the backing plate and the pad surface can delaminate. Meaning the backing plate can come unstuck from the pad surface. Mostly you will only find out when heat is generated within the pad whilst using them. Himmie pads are cheap so i would just buy a new set out of safety.
  13. MrDralas

    MrDralas Super n00b

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    As long as you check where they mate and there’s no cracks where they join, old pads shouldn’t be a problem. They usually delaminate due to rust or over heating, mind you I’ve seen them delaminated out the box a few times “good brands”, mind you this was the automotive world.


    If it was me, I’d check where the pads and backing plate meet for any lifting of the brake material and look for cracks in the braking material as well. Depending on how the surface looks I might scuff then up with some sand paper. Lay the sand paper on a flat surface then rub the pad on it to make sure the pads stay flat.

    Here are some faily extreme examples, I couldn’t find the picture I had of the new pads that were bad out of the box. So here are some google image pictures.

    B5FFC028-29EF-4783-9595-4DBD63F2189E.jpeg 06A88AC8-365E-4FF8-8ED2-B998CA55880F.jpeg

    Pads usually have a very hard life so are build pretty durable. But if you look at them and aren’t sure you’d trust them, then it’s be worth replacing them.
    You are correct no shelf life as long as they are still in good nick. I personally wouldn’t use pads that are older than the 90’s due to asbestos, then again depending which country your in they are still made with it.
    sam2019 likes this.
  14. gsborn

    gsborn n00b

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    Her some glimpse of Denmark West Coast
  15. gsborn

    gsborn n00b

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    Are there others who are experiencing uneven lengthen chain, original chain after 14000 km ?
    I did and changed it to this JT CHAIN 525X1R/110 OPEN CHAIN WITH RIVET LINK and happily some of the chain noises and klunk's are disappeared.
    I have a chain oiler.
  16. Loadtoad101

    Loadtoad101 Been here awhile

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    I replaced my chain also, at 13,000 miles. When they get old some of the links get frozen up and you will have lots of chain noises and "klunks". When my old chain was pulled off, I held it at one end and let it dangle. Instead of hanging straight down, it was all crooked. That was because some of the links were stuck! You can imagine what that would do while going around your sprockets.
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  17. ScottFree

    ScottFree Been here awhile

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    Both the Harley and BMW burned through rear pads like potato chips. I was surprised by this, as I am the type that prefers to use the rear brake for little more than keeping the back wheel behind the front (and the GS had "linked" brakes, so I rarely even touched the back-brake pedal on that bike), but was assured by multiple sources that both bikes are known for going through rear pads in 20K or so miles. Go figure.

    One possible explanation is that I live on the boundary between suburbs and country, and so I can actually go a fair distance (measured in miles, and sometimes in tens of miles, and occasionally in hundreds of miles) without stopping. And in light traffic, I'm prone to use compression rather than brake linings when I need to drop some velocity.

    Of course, if you're unhappy with the performance of the stock front brakes (many people seem to think they require excessive effort, though as a Harley owner I think they're pretty much average), this could be an excuse to install the higher-performance pads listed in the maintenance/hacks thread (I think they're from the back of a KTM or something).

    Fun fact: Space Shuttle brake linings were single-use, at least up through the Challenger explosion (they might have upgraded while the system was down for booster re-design). Seems that as soon as the pilot applied the brakes, the linings would shatter and de-bond. They'd stay in place as long as the pilot kept the pressure on, so the ritual was apply the brakes, keep them on until the orbiter was stopped, then listen to the pieces of brake lining falling out onto the runway...
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  18. MrDralas

    MrDralas Super n00b

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    I’m on chain 3 after 20,000 (22k?) some odd miles.
    The first one stretched out till it was too loose for the adjusters on my last trip.
    The second one broke and piled up inside the covered area and stalled the engine. It broke my chain guard, tool tube cover and took a few chunks of aluminum out of the side cover for the engine. I checked and adjusted the chain the same day it broke about 400 miles before or so. None of the links were binded up or had play. Just one side of half the master link was there the rest was missing. I don’t know if the plate clip came off or what cause none of it was found. I walked up and down the highway looking so no one would get a flat from it.
    I carry a spare chain on trips so not a huge issue.

    I think it might have something to do with the extreme cold and heat cycles the space ship gets vs our bikes will never see.

    I’m somewheres over 20,000 miles (dash replaced and don’t remember the exact mileage) I’m pretty much due for front and rear brakes both. I try to use both brakes all the time, the rear ends up being Morse code some times but oh well.
    I never found, the front brake lacking or needing too much presser. It’s a fairly progressive brake, I only 2 finger ever unless it’s an emergency stop, which i have gotten the front tire to start chipping a couple times braking hard. Is it as good as 6 piston dual caliber brakes that you can do stoppers with one finger, no not at all but then again this isn’t that kinda bike.

    These are what I ordered, my bike is at the dealers probably for another couple weeks again so I can’t how they are. But I think these are the ones that are needed.

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  19. Kiwiscoot

    Kiwiscoot Been here awhile

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    My chain has 14000kms on now and the adjusters are pretty much where in the middle of their travel. I have noticed no wear in chain or sprockets. I have the Tutoro oiler with the double nozzle and checks weekly to see if the chain is wet both sides.
    I've used Tutoro oil , 75W90 gear oil and old engine oil with no issues.

    One thing I did notice was that the master link had no grease in, so I would advise people to check it and be careful not to lose the master-link o-rings. Pretty easy to do.
    MrDralas likes this.
  20. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    1. Because the bikes center of gravity is somewheres between my ankles.
    2. Despite the ground clearance the seat height is low enough to flat foot duck walk the bike through bad patches.
    3. The torque and horsepower are all tractable.
    4. It's soooooooo smooth it makes butter wish it were that smooth.
    5. The bikes do what is says right on the box.
    6. Ergonomics are good.
    7. Brembo, Denso, Keihin etc. are component suppliers to Enfield.
    8. Harris Performance forgot more about building bikes than I could learn in two lifetimes.
    9. Parts are affordable and they are owner maintainable.
    10. They are simple rugged reliable uncomplicated pure motorcycles. More simple than the honorable and venerable KLR even.

    P.S.
    The aftermarket for them is pretty dang good and the price of the bike and the prices of the farkles are amazingly affordable.