Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. MrDralas

    MrDralas Super n00b

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    I already replaced my seat and I’m happy enough with it.
    Yours does look good though, you did a good job, I was wondering if you reused the cover cause it looked very much like the stock material.
  2. drdubb

    drdubb OFWG Supporter

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    A couple of videos on the stalling issue and rerouting the vent pipe and one for relocating the ambient temp. sensor





  3. ScottFree

    ScottFree Been here awhile

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    Owned a KLR, looked at a DR (have also owned an XT500 and an R1200GS), and now have a Himalayan. For my current use (riding to neat places, often thousands of miles from home, often on unpaved roads), the Himma made the most sense.

    The DR is a better dirt bike, I suspect—more power and suspension, less weight—but it’s got a small tank, so-so gas mileage, and “dirt bike” ergonomics (really tall, skinny seat).

    The KLR has great range (~300 miles on a tank), more power and suspension than the Himalayan, a frame mounted fairing that works pretty well on the highway, but again, dirt bike ergos. In addition, it’s as heavy as the Himma (heavier if you add the crash bars needed to protect that plastic bodywork), and it carries its weight high and forward—not fun on loose gravel.

    The Himalayan has adequate power and suspension for dirt road riding, reasonably good ergonomics, great fuel economy, nice balance, and is easy to outfit. It’s a very easy, confidence-inspiring bike to ride. Plus it’s got a center stand (not so great if you’re jumping over logs, but nice for loading and maintenance). And it has a cool factor that the other two don’t—as Rider magazine said, “it looks like a tool because it is one.” Next to it, the DR and KLR look like toys. Not by itself a reason to choose one bike over another, but a nice bonus.

    My reasons. YMMV, of course.
  4. Beemerboff

    Beemerboff Long timer

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    Problem with top boxes isn't just weight, vibration comes in to it too, particularly if you ride dirt roads, and steel seems to resist that better than some aluminium alloys.
    After a few mishaps I dont rely on the top box catch, I always bolt the box down through the base, no point in waiting on the inevitable.
    The aim when loading a bike is to keep the weight down, within the wheelbase, close to the centreline and equal side to side.
    Aftermarket luggage which even makes the slightest effort to do that is rare, some are offset to avoid the exhaust system and everything is located behind the rear axle and high up.
    And some of these metal /double skin plastic boxes weigh more than the contents, a 40 ish litre Hepco and Becker top box would be too heavy for that Givi rack, empty!
    I keep a light , cheap plastic top box for stuff like a down sleeping bag, towels and clothes and put the heavy stuff in a big Ortlieb dry bag on the rear seat, and in a well strapped on tank bag.
    Would probably use a Gaint Loop if the price wasn't so ridiculous, and the Ortieb doubles as luggage if I have to fly in.
    But I travel light, with just my ancient lightweight hill (trail) walking gear in case I cant find a room for the night - I put the bikes handling before having a portable shower , toilet, kitchen and lounge room on the bike!
    Richarde1605 likes this.
  5. MrDralas

    MrDralas Super n00b

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    When I was traveling the camping aspect is what I was looking for. Im an oddity where I prefer to sleep outside and would probably 99% of the time if I didn’t have a wife or live in a city, folks tend to get upset about that for some reason.

    I don’t have a top box, just the RE panniers that are dented and scuffed up now due to dropping the bike as often as I shouldn’t have. I think I actually bent on the racks a bit, on the right side of the bike. It use to come on and off easy, now the little bracket flipper things done slide between the pannier rack and the rear rack.
    F54255DF-C389-46CF-A0C5-7B3E2867EDC8.jpeg
    This is what my bike looked like from May- till yesterday.
    The right pannier had some clothes and my laptop. The left pannier was food stuffs(food,pot,coffee press) and a booster pack. the orange bag had my colder weather stuff (extra Gloves, bar muffs, jacket liners, sweater, long undies, etc) the green bag was my camping stuff( 2 sleeping bag, hammock, tarp, sleeping pad, camp chair) I carried a 1P tent as well on the back seat where it touches the rack. The front bag had consumeable parts in it (spark plug, brake pads, extra cables, tubes and a chain) the other side was a fuel can 5 litre. My tank bag had bug spray, sun screen, sunglasses, 2 hats(tuque and a wide brim hat), a small pull saw and then water, lots and lots of water about 4.5 litres total.
    All in all I’m less than 60 pounds of weight not including the water and fuel. All the camping stuff is light weight thru hiking.
    On the back seat I don’t notice the weight much, the fuel can and front bag you don’t notice at all if you take one or the other off(no balance issue) the panniers where they get further from the Center line you do notice the weights which is why they stayed lighter and balanced.
    I’d like to get some soft bags, but I think I would have had to replaced my press and laptop if I had soft bags.
    I didn’t have any issues anywhere that I went in the last while, with the exception of crossing a marble rock beach. It was terrible, but then some younger fellas came by on dirt bikes and were struggling as well so I didn’t feel as worthless then.

    Your right about that it does, that stand seems to be the thing that catches everything. Rocks, grass, mud, shrubs and then logs very much so. It’ll slide over some what but if it catches it’ll stop you dead in your tracks.
    sqeeezy and fe2cruz like this.
  6. Coopdway

    Coopdway Curiouser Supporter

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    Another Slimey Crud Run weekend, without the (official) Slimey Crud Run part. We had fun...we always do.

    IMG_1908.JPG

    IMG_1926.JPG

    More on what went wrong and much less wrong here
    gsborn, Bojer, Geschift and 4 others like this.
  7. ScottFree

    ScottFree Been here awhile

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    Considering Saturday and Sunday were in the 50s, I’m glad I spent rainy Saturday inside a vehicle and under a roof! I don’t envy your getting so wet! How much water did you have to drain out of your Himma’s engine, anyway?
  8. Steve Rice

    Steve Rice Been here awhile

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    Looks like a memorable weekend. Thought I was going to flood my bike out right after I got it heading down a water covered road in to work. Got soaked to the knees.

    I see you have Minnesota plates. Do you just live along the river? Your videos seem to be mostly in Wisconsin. Have you riden the trans Wisconsin trail? I'm thinking of giving it a go come spring. I'm over in Des Moines. Figured it wouldn't be to far to the start.
  9. CDRODA396

    CDRODA396 Adventurer

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    D151B39F-745B-44F3-B0FD-981C9137E0C3.jpeg
    DB5EA922-749F-42A3-B71C-77BC5FBC35F7.jpeg
    I (6’2”) have the tall, (first pic) wife (5’6’) the standard (next pic). Did 207 miles in central/western NC in the saddle today and both of us LOVE the comfort over stock. I have ridden both and currently prefer hers. Hers has a “butt bucket,” unfortunately, its hard to see, but the tall is still slightly sloped forward. After this trip I intend to have an auto upholstery shop try and maintain as much height as possible, but still level it up and give it the “shelf” hers has.
    Eatmore Mudd likes this.
  10. Steve Rice

    Steve Rice Been here awhile

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    Thanks, I'm 5'10" with a 30" inseam so have been leaning towards the standard. I don't mind the stock seat other than the forward slope. I found on long rides, if I sit straight down on the back with the pilion as a lumbar pad it doesn't feel bad. But alot of the time I feel pushed towards the tank. The standard looks a bit like the Corbin as far as contouring.

    Curious what the bags are on her bike. I'm also still debating between hard and soft panniers. Decisions decisions.
  11. mb8

    mb8 One planet, no option.

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    Perfect answer. (and thanks for all the other replies)

    I like ALL bikes and would have 1 of each if I could :) Have though about a Royal Enfield many times.
    Geschift and Richarde1605 like this.
  12. mr tea

    mr tea Been here awhile

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    After my previous post regarding the service and finding out that the engine needs to be stripped down to find the knocking, i noticed that i had been charged for Rock oil fully synthetic oil. I questioned this as in the book it states semi synthetic oil. The mechanic showed me an updated memo from ER UK stating that only fully synthetic oil is now only to be used in the Himalayan.
  13. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    Question for the break experts here:
    In 2016 when I went on my first Ladakh trip with the Himalayan I bough 2 sets of spare break pads which I forgot about. Just found them deep inside the tools bag and they got a bit dirty and rusty as the plastic packing has been ripped open over time. Is there a shelf life for such tings? Is the surface deteriorating from time and humidity? Obviously looks are irrelevant but what about function?

    -sam
  14. Coopdway

    Coopdway Curiouser Supporter

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    It was wet and the forecast prepared us for that part. As you mention, the windy cool wet riding was not what we were willing to do all day. The bike runs but I’m still finding water (no minnows) in places I’m surprised at. At coffee in Mpls this morning, then GoMoto to get air and more oil filters. The process will be featured soon in a new Post.

  15. Coopdway

    Coopdway Curiouser Supporter

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    We’re right next to the river outside of Red Wing so I spend most of my riding in SE MN and SW WI. First time on the Trans Wisc was on my TW200. I had been at the WI Guzzi Rally so started at the Illinois line. Went half way that weekend then later did the north half. We ride sections of the Route all the time, the KLR did the north half a few years ago. Annually we ride parts of it , especially the northern 1/3.

    Do it.

    Steve Rice likes this.
  16. ScottFree

    ScottFree Been here awhile

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    Far as I know, brake pads have an unlimited shelf life. I’ve used NOS pads that were over ten years old without incident. Don’t see any difference between storage and use (if anything, use should be harder due to heat and water exposure), and right now the front pads on my 2004 Road King are still original and work fine (my 2006 GS was still on original front pads when I sold it in July).

    I remember back in the days of “organic” brakes (wood chips and camel dung, given how poorly they worked), they’d tell you to sand them now and then to restore the surface. But this wasn’t about age; it was because they glazed so easily.

    Brush off the surface rust and run ‘em.
    sam2019 likes this.
  17. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    thanx, I had similar thoughts. You sure dont break a lot - in comparison my 2001 R1100 is on her second set of disks ...
  18. mr tea

    mr tea Been here awhile

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    Over time the backing plate and the pad surface can delaminate. Meaning the backing plate can come unstuck from the pad surface. Mostly you will only find out when heat is generated within the pad whilst using them. Himmie pads are cheap so i would just buy a new set out of safety.
  19. MrDralas

    MrDralas Super n00b

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    As long as you check where they mate and there’s no cracks where they join, old pads shouldn’t be a problem. They usually delaminate due to rust or over heating, mind you I’ve seen them delaminated out the box a few times “good brands”, mind you this was the automotive world.


    If it was me, I’d check where the pads and backing plate meet for any lifting of the brake material and look for cracks in the braking material as well. Depending on how the surface looks I might scuff then up with some sand paper. Lay the sand paper on a flat surface then rub the pad on it to make sure the pads stay flat.

    Here are some faily extreme examples, I couldn’t find the picture I had of the new pads that were bad out of the box. So here are some google image pictures.

    B5FFC028-29EF-4783-9595-4DBD63F2189E.jpeg 06A88AC8-365E-4FF8-8ED2-B998CA55880F.jpeg

    Pads usually have a very hard life so are build pretty durable. But if you look at them and aren’t sure you’d trust them, then it’s be worth replacing them.
    You are correct no shelf life as long as they are still in good nick. I personally wouldn’t use pads that are older than the 90’s due to asbestos, then again depending which country your in they are still made with it.
    sam2019 likes this.
  20. gsborn

    gsborn n00b

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    Her some glimpse of Denmark West Coast