Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 1, 2019
    Oddometer:
    286
    Location:
    India / Germany
    the weight is certainly a factor, 110kg vs 60?
    and my riding style is rather aggressive.
    but i was asked if I would prefer a jap bike, and in the west I would for the reasons given. I also do not expect a US$ 3000 value to equal 9000. So its ok for you if you can wait for indians sending you spares via ebay and fix them yourself. I am too old for that
  2. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 1, 2019
    Oddometer:
    286
    Location:
    India / Germany
    Itchy for the ump.teenth time:
    Nobody has made a full check of her bike after she gave it up for a new one. Things like shock absorbers wear out slow. I did not even feel the difference before the tech showed me. clutch I dont know. i burned a set on my way from leh to manali. thats 500km. different style? for sure. I also burnt my rearCEAT tyre in 4000km, others use them 10k. so FOR ME theREH in the west would be EXPENSIVE.
  3. Carmackle

    Carmackle Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2017
    Oddometer:
    394
    Itchy's new expedition isn't starting out too good-fell over in the mud & a flat rear tire on the first day!
  4. Kiwiscoot

    Kiwiscoot Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2010
    Oddometer:
    536
    Location:
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Sam, seems to me that some of your experience is a fact of where you live. In the west the workshops will have the know how to replace the bearings (they are standard bearings) and not the whole swingarms just for some worn bearings. Your environment is harsh. I've done 14000kms and weigh 90 kgs and my shocks are just fine. I'd know if they are shot because I'd be off the bike at 110kph in the twisties. Lack of infrastructure and skills are causing you grief and I can appreciate that. I do not want to minimise your frustrations however I suspect a Jap or Euro bike experience might be just as frustrating for you because of your location and application.

    Here in NZ the RE is the cheapest bike I have ever had. To buy, to own, to farkle and to get serviced. My 10 000km service came to NZ186 (parts & labour)which is the cheapest cost for a service of any bike I have ever owned before and not serviced myself. My previous Hondas, Suzukis, SYM scooter and Vespa has been way more expensive for a big service. Hey with the hourly rate here, just getting the plastics off other adventure bikes to get the the mechanicals would cost more than the whole RE service, and then we talk of multi-valves in awkward places. Just take the Honda TransAlp, 600,650 or 700 for example, some of the greatest "light" adventure bikes. Just to take the plastics off and all the dismantling to get to those awkward rear cylinder valves takes more time than it takes to do the whole service on the RE. Ask me , I know and have done it in the past
    My experience is that motorcycle ownership in the west is expensive, especially if you don't service your own bike yourself and the trend is for motorcycles to get more complex, so more and more of a challenge to service oneself. That was what attracted me to RE, I understand the design, simple, uncomplicated and easy to service and fix. And I like its quirky quant looks and character. JMHO.
  5. Kiwiscoot

    Kiwiscoot Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2010
    Oddometer:
    536
    Location:
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    True nobody checked her bike, but it still does not distract from the fact that she did 36 000kms safely over some of the most challenging terrain and conditions in one piece. Just the fact that she is continuing her journey on another Himalayan is a testament to her trust in the bike to get her thru again. She is not the only one, Nathanthepostman and others too. We will keep referring to her and others that have tested the bikes which satisfied our expectations. I for one have stopped worrying about the bike, I ride it, enjoy it, look after it and deals with what comes my way.
    LOL which might be a fracture in my ankle from the riding 2 weeks ago. Keeps swelling when I walk with searing pain and makes a crack noise when I twist my ankle. So off to the doc tomorrow.
    FloydNY and Loadtoad101 like this.
  6. nathanthepostman

    nathanthepostman Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2009
    Oddometer:
    899
    My 17,000 mile bike, when I sold it, which is just shy of 30,000 kilometres, wanted for nothing but regular servicing. One change of brake pads, warranty repair on head gasket and steering head bearings, and I think that was about it. And I rode it pretty hard and had it fully loaded up for most of that time. I think you may have been unlucky Sam or as others said, maybe it was the conditions where you rode it or the way it was serviced. The short service intervals can make it a bit more expensive to run over here in the West, especially compared to the CRF250L, but if you're self servicing then I think the cheap price of parts make it a very cheap bike, especially when you factor in depreciation, which is negligible compared to say that of the G310GS which really struggle to hold their second hand value.

    The question of why a Himalayan over a KLR or DR, it's a mute point for many of us as you can't easily get hold of the latter two bikes, not here in the UK at least. I've ridden the Himalayan back to back with the KLR and a Tenere 660 and apart from the extra power of the bigger bikes, which was beneficial on the road, the Himalayan - to me - was a much more manageable, enjoyable and capable bike than those other two, certainly off road. The other two felt very top heavy with undersprung suspension and they both just felt a bit dated to ride. In fairness, I also own a Husky TR650 Terra which I like a lot, but just lacks the simplicity of the Himalayan. It's a shame that bike was discontinued so quickly.
  7. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 1, 2019
    Oddometer:
    286
    Location:
    India / Germany
    The cheapest bike is the one that needs no service. In that sense my BMW 1100 from 2001 is the cheapest bike I ever had (and I had many). I needed one bearing replacement for the kardan in 2012 - which was an embarrassment for BMW as they should have never worn out, at least not before 200.000km or so.
    It did cost me 600 Euros with work. That is a lot. But other than that - only oil + filters and brake pads (I learned its not break pads LOL).
    And tires, of course, lots of Metzeler tires which are great but only last 6-8k km.

    I bought the bike with 6000km on it and never gave it a proper BMW service, not once. When the bike was parked over many month it would always come up right away with a fresh battery. If I drive it in the 80-100km/h range it uses 4.5-5l/100, so just 0.5l more than the REH. Insurance is nothing (LESS THAN i PAY IN iNDIA FOR MY reh). It has now 80k km and it will probably outlast me. That is a cheap bike.

    there isnt great lack of infrastructure in India but plenty of lack of skills. actually there is a good as no skill in any of the RE mechanics here.
    Many know less about the bikes than I do and I know very little. sometimes its cringe-worthy watching them work. but then again they make 200 bucks a month. so yes, there is some level of grief. but the price make up for a lot. look at the bill. its ridiculous for what I get.
    mb8 likes this.
  8. Eidmantas

    Eidmantas n00b

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2017
    Oddometer:
    8
    Location:
    Europe
    As somebody looking to get a Himalayan next year for EU TET could somebody tell me if the bikes sold in Europe are any better QC/consturction wise (frame especially)? I've seen all of these horror storries/pictures of the frame braking at the front, just shears off. It seems at least for the Europeans, apart from getting an old beaten up XL600V or an overpriced XRV it's +/- the only choice apart from going to the CRF1000L, Tenere 700.
  9. Kiwiscoot

    Kiwiscoot Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2010
    Oddometer:
    536
    Location:
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    A few pages back (560?)there is a huge discussion about the frames. The bike will handle the TET just fine. Check out ''Itchy Boots'' YouTube channel to see what RE Himalayan can handle.
  10. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 1, 2019
    Oddometer:
    286
    Location:
    India / Germany
    Hornets nest !!!
    I will only say this: my interviews are honest, nobody in them has any beef against RE, actually they live from that brands products. I have no beef either. So yes, the breaks are real. how many? nobody knows. Somewhere bewteen 1% and 0.1% I guess. Occasionally more.

    Are export bikes better? Think about it for a moment: the frames are made at the very beginning of the production process, the first element so to say. At this stage RE needed to make two different batches, one good one and one not-so-good-one. If they make only one batch and later x-ray them and use the bad ones for India - that would be beyond stupid so I count that out right away.
    How much would RE save on making a bunch of bad frames? not much as the steel they use is the same all other big companies use also. There is simply no saving in using inferior steel as the good stuff is made in HUGE quantities and bad stuff would have to be made by the side - so again, unlikely.
    Now how about after-shipping-checkup by the dealer and/or distributor in the receiving country?
    well, if THEY use x-ray RE could do that easier (with a still naked frame) so - unlikely. and all other checks are not covering the quality of the frame.
    So long story short - when I called the factory in 2018 inquiring about export quality (at the time it was geared at the failing swingarms but same question) I was insured there would be no difference in export vs. inland production on the parts level.
    There IS a difference in individual parts e.g. carb vs. EFI and some suggest the paint jobs are better for export, which I do believe - but that is easily done.

    -sam
  11. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 1, 2019
    Oddometer:
    286
    Location:
    India / Germany
    Does anyone know where I can source this part?

    solo-reh02.jpg
  12. Thinwater

    Thinwater Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2018
    Oddometer:
    76
    Location:
    Heart of Dixie
    I've got nearly 14,000 on my 2018 RE Himalayan, the only OEM parts I've had issues with were steering head bearings at 13,500, the master link in the chain at about 9000, and now the chain is worn out and needs a new chain and sprocket. I have periodically tighten checked the bolts on the engine and have found some needing tightened, and this has saved me any engine issues so far. It has been on trail nearly 40% of the miles I'd estimate.
    Bojer and Loadtoad101 like this.
  13. Steve Rice

    Steve Rice Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2019
    Oddometer:
    121
    Location:
    Des Moines, IA
    First sub freezing day here in Iowa.

    Note to self, throw something over the seat at night. Heavy frost is a pain to get off.
    CDRODA396 likes this.
  14. CarstenB

    CarstenB Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2015
    Oddometer:
    509
    Location:
    Houston/TX
    that logic is quite flawed. You'd have to proof that the BMW would last just as well in India under the same riding conditions (assuming it could manage those roads) and that the Hima would need the same amount of maintenance when you'd ride it in Europe (plenty of examples that it does not). Surprised you manage to get 4-4.5l/100km on the Hima which may explain some of the heavy wear.
    Doctor T likes this.
  15. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 1, 2019
    Oddometer:
    286
    Location:
    India / Germany
    I am not comparing anything, I explain my definition of a cheap bike, thats all.

    But I am confident those 260 kg of reliable tech would serve me well anywhere. I have this bike since 2006, and of course I was not only driving German highways with it. The reason I am not bringing it to India is mostly red tape. I could not use it here longer than a year and importing is an expensive nightmare. Its also too heavy for the roads in the mountains. One reason I never considered a GS1200. Only the smaller BMWs.

    .
  16. ScottFree

    ScottFree Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2011
    Oddometer:
    459
    Location:
    Ill-Annoy
    Of course, you could buy four (five?) Himalayans for the cost of a big GS.

    You might also want to spend a little time on the GS boards to see what issues people are having with the current vintage. Fork stanchion recall, alternator failure (which is fixed by pulling the engine and splitting the cases), security system refusing to unlock the gas tank, all manner of problems with the computerized stuff... Could be the Oilhead hit a sweet spot, a particularly good balance between sophistication and complexity.
    darmahman likes this.
  17. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 1, 2019
    Oddometer:
    286
    Location:
    India / Germany
    I know all about it and its a shame. Nobody seems to give a flying f*** about quality over a quick buck anymore. It all started when BMW used china made parts. thats why I will never sell my 2001 which is probably the last boxer thats 100% german made (maybe a few plastic parts are from elsewhere but nothing essential).
    Prices are thru the roof and quality is in the basement. I do not know why they throw away a formerly great name for a few silver coins.
    Maybe chinamen already bought up BMW, who knows whats really going on behind those dark curtains .. :-)

    anyway, as mentioned above this is not a comparison (and certainly not with a REH which would be ridiculous) - just my own definition of a cheap bike. I bought it in 2006 for 6500€ with 6000km on the odo. Thats close to the price of a maybe 2 new REH in Germany (corrected for inflation).
    I'd do it anytime again.

    .
  18. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 1, 2019
    Oddometer:
    286
    Location:
    India / Germany
    If I ever buy a GS it will be one from before 1996. Those where still manageable while still reliable and relatively simple.
    No wonder the are price wise at par with much newer versions of the same bike.
    So yes, I can sympathize with REH owners in the west. Its is probably the simplest bike in terms of whats still legal under todays emission standards.
    I guess we will have another talk about reliability when more of them reach the 30tkm mark. :-)
    statistics is a bitch, it only works with big numbers. and the REH is still too new for those numbers to be reached (in the west, in India maybe 80.000 are running already).

    .
  19. 0xsergy

    0xsergy Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2019
    Oddometer:
    32
    Location:
    Hamilton
    What is your idle rpm? If it is EFI your idle setting has an effect on how lean/rich it is. Ideally 1150-1200 is good but given you're breaking the engine bin maybe go for 1250-1300. Also check your clutch Freeplay, maybe it's not disengaging enough and heating up with clutch plates rubbing.

    Also, to me that sounds like a good excuse to squeeze through traffic, lol. I try to lanesplit if traffic is dead stopped for long periods just for that reason.
  20. johnny42

    johnny42 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2018
    Oddometer:
    153
    Location:
    New York
    Is there a standard on how to refer to mileage on this board? I've seen folks using km all the time. Being near Canada, km to me means kilometers. So when someone refers to their mileage as 10,000 km do they mean kilometers or does that mean miles, as in 10k miles? Big difference when someone says they got 6000km from their tires. Is that 6000 miles or 3,600 miles? (Fellow OCD'rs can relate)