Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. Kiwiscoot

    Kiwiscoot Been here awhile

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    430
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    Hi Brian. There is no jet kit for these bikes. The standard idle jet is 15 and main jet is 125. I had same issue as you. I fitted a #17.5 idle jet and 130 main and lifted needle 0.7mm. Fixed it. Search this thread and you'll see my journey tuning it. I also ran a Uni filter foam filter and i've made a Uni foam filter which I have not run yet. I run the stock exhauste.
    I'm in Christchurch..where are you?
  2. Loadtoad101

    Loadtoad101 Been here awhile

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    This is what I bought: https://www.lomo.co.uk/acatalog/waterproof-motorcycle-soft-panniers-set.html#SID=118
    TwoUpTourer likes this.
  3. Beemerboff

    Beemerboff Long timer

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    A previous poster has suggested that RE have revised the head bolts and torque requirements, and, if correct, your dealer should have details, and be able to advise accordingly.
    Another procedure usually carried out on autos is realigning the exhaust after it has settled on its mounts - on my bike the exhaust had to be forced up about 50 mm to reach the fixing point, which of course stressed the complete system and the head joint.
    A 40 mm long bracket and the system is sitting nicely and relatively unstressed.

    Just fixed a intermittent short, the extreme lower end of the ignition switch assembly has a bump on the housing for a fixing screw and this was brushing against the wiring harness when the bars were turned.
    Took 18,000 km to wear through.
    The harness should be held clear off the moving parts by a cable tie to the instrument support bar.
    Some are, some are not, but it is easy to check and easy to rectify once the cover plate is off.
    fe2cruz likes this.
  4. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    There is a guy in India who sells a mechanism that cuts the clutch pull load in half. I used it on my bike for a year and it works great. The reason I uninstalled it was it uses nonstandard cables and me riding the wild wild east am often away from supply lines. Anyway its only 50 bucks if memory serves and I am sure he will ship to wherever you live. He is a very nice person. his name is madhan and his whatsapp number is +91 9620484111.
  5. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    Hi Brian,
    I think you got the better deal. I see a lot of troubled EFI Himmies where I live, fuel pump problems and rotten fuel that clogs the injectors. Problems you will never know LOL.
    In fact just yesterday I picked up a 2016 BS3 with only 1800 km on the odo for half price. That was a bit of luck!!

    regarding jetting, from the olden days there is this video which may be of some help:



    in a few month time maybe I can offer some enhanced torque with our new 450cc project, an Indian/Italian cooperation which will work better on carb than injection:

    https://himalayan-tools.com/project-450cc/
  6. motoretro

    motoretro Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the heads up on this, I'll look into it.
  7. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    Contact 6 Sigma racing. If they don't have a jet kit ready to ship then I'll bet a pint that they can pull the jets from shelf stock and assemble a kit in less time than that pint would last.
  8. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    Guglatech

    He posts here, his filters are highly regarded and have saved A LOT of people a LOT of headaches. :-)
    Flicka likes this.
  9. azccj

    azccj Adventurer

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    Mar 7, 2010
    Oddometer:
    99
    I currently have the cylinder head off my REH. I had to have the head milled because it had a .005" dip/valley below the exhaust port, which seems to be the place where the head gasket on the REH likes to leak on others bikes that had the same problem. My bike currently has just over 11K miles and the clacking from the leaking head gasket started around 9k miles. The head gasket used on the REH is a 3 piece sheet metal thing and I'm told by the machine shop that did my head's milling, that this type of head gasket is very durable and will not blow out. But if the head is warped it wont seal properly. But the good news is the head's ports and valves are clean, I mean really clean. No sign of deposits at all.

    This is what I'm going to use to seal the valve cover, https://www.permatex.com/products/g...et-makers/permatex-optimum-grey-gasket-maker/

    The last 6 days I've had the bike all apart while I had it on the lift. All the bearings on my bike, steering head, swing arm, rear suspension linkage all had good grease and plenty of it from the factory.

    I replaced the steering head bearings as the originals were a bit notchy. What a pain getting the bottom bearing off without damaging the bottom seal. I had to weld together a special tool to do the job.

    I should have the bike back together next week......I hope.
    Bradster49, Bojer and fe2cruz like this.
  10. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Sep 14, 2002
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    3,300
    Location:
    Newnan, GA USA

    Hmmm... I must have missed that post, but thanks for the heads up. I'll ask my dealer about any revised head torque bulletins when I pick up my bike. And thanks for bringing up the harness chafing issue as well. I'll need to remember to take a peak at this area to see if there's a potential issue.



    Warped head? That's not good. I'm wondering if this would have happened anyway due to normal stresses in the head from the casting/machining processes, or if it could have been exacerbated by inadequate torque over the time, and miles. As in, could the head have been held more stable if it had been retorqued earlier in it's life? Often, parts are more stable when constrained rather than allowed to move and possibly deform. All the more reason to be preemptive and retorque early to hopefully avert an issue down the road. Owning multiple bikes, and with limited time to ride, it's possible that I may not reach that mileage until after my two year warranty has expired. Anything that may help avoid future issues may be worth a little extra work up front on my part. :thumb

    Permetex makes good products and this one sounds like it'll do the job. Thanks for the recommendation.

    Good to hear that the factory seems to have gotten a bit better about the grease. If memory serves, it seems this issue was more common with the earlier bike, but that I've read several owners stating more recently that their bikes had plenty of grease. I'll likely take a look sooner rather than later, just to be sure though.

    Special tools are my specialty. :bubba And copying them from others is even more so. Haha. Could you maybe post a photo of yours to help save some time figuring out what is needed?
    Eatmore Mudd likes this.
  11. CarstenB

    CarstenB Been here awhile

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    Houston/TX
    for completeness sake, the RE engine manual calls for Loctite 5900 as sealant for the cylinder head cover.

    Screenshot 2019-12-07 at 11.41.45 PM.png
  12. azccj

    azccj Adventurer

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    99
    Here you go. Simple tool, just a 1 inch peice of steel pipe 3 inches long I got from Home Depot, with 2X2 angle iron welded to the pipe. The pipe slides over the steering stem then the bottom of the pipe gets welded to the top of the inner race of the bearing. I put a wet rag around the bearing seal so as not to fry it. 4 hits from a hammer on the angle iron as I held the top of the steering stem, and off the lower bearing race came. No damage to anything. After I looked on Youtube at how the job is normally done, with a chisel and hammer , it made me kringe. So I came up with this.

    The round piece zip-tied to the tool is what I used to seat the new bearing on the steering stem. Another plumbing piece found at Home Depot that I turned down on my lathe. It slides down the steering stem and rests on the inner race on the bearing. Another 1 inch piece of pipe, about 9-10 inches long, is then slid onto the steering stem and rests on round piece I turned down. 3-4 wacks with a hammer striking the top of the pipe and the bearing is solidly seated, once again without any damage to anything.
    IMG_0805.JPG IMG_0806.JPG
    Eatmore Mudd and Randy like this.
  13. MrDralas

    MrDralas Super n00b

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    I used a bearing splitter when I did mine, they can be had pretty cheap. Your was a Clever work around tho, while looking for a bearing splitter picture I came across this, which looks looks it would work well as well.
    737459EB-832E-48F3-AC78-469DB7098745.jpeg
    I mean before I had access to any fancy tools I use to grind a slice in the stuck wheel bearing races them finish breaking them with a chisel then just slide them off by hand.
  14. Doctor T

    Doctor T Been here awhile

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    Haven't had a proper reply yet. I need to know what size inner tube fits the front 21" rim, 250, 275, 300. Also what inner tube should i use for the 120 x 90 x17 rear tyre?. 300, 350, 375?.
  15. MrDralas

    MrDralas Super n00b

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    When I order tubes for my bikes, I just order a tube the same size as the tire or very close as to what’s going on. They normally have some variance of sizes that they will work with, much like bicycle tubes
    drhippie2 and Bradster49 like this.
  16. Doctor T

    Doctor T Been here awhile

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    HD tubes seem to be cheaper and more available in metric sizes
  17. CarstenB

    CarstenB Been here awhile

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    plenty of conversion tables online that you can check out. For the front a 3.00 should be fine and for the rear a 4.50. The guidelines are somewhat fishy because the tubes are... flexible and can cover multiple tire sizes.
    Doctor T likes this.
  18. Loadtoad101

    Loadtoad101 Been here awhile

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    That would be me! The service manager had inferred that there were new head bolts and torquing procedures. After getting home and reviewing the parts list that was on my warranty repair invoice, the head bolts had the same Part Number as the originals. My leak was in the very same place as AZCCJ's. No mention was made of a warped head, but I was worried that that could be a problem on mine. Since having the bike back I have only ridden it on a 70 mile round trip to work the other day. No evidence of any leaking or abnormal sounds. I will be keeping a close watch on the repair.
  19. chelmi_ouest_coast

    chelmi_ouest_coast Adventurer

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    Doctor T, gacollier and drhippie2 like this.
  20. CaptainTrips

    CaptainTrips Adventurer

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    I thought I did. A couple of pages back. And I think you 'liked' the post. ??

    The sizes I showed are straight off the tubes. It appears that most tubes are made to fit a range of tire sizes, as reflected in the numbers that I provided. Choose a tube that includes the Hima tire sizes somewhere in its fitment ranged. The ranges appear to be specific to the tube manufacturer.

    Probably any dealer who sells dirt bikes will have tubes that fit the Hima on their shelves.