Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. BurnieM

    BurnieM Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2003
    Oddometer:
    4,416
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    M20 refers to the thread. The head is always larger.

    (not showing off)
    Doctor T and Eatmore Mudd like this.
  2. CarstenB

    CarstenB Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2015
    Oddometer:
    635
    Location:
    NL
    27mm socket says the manual.

    Screenshot 2020-05-06 at 7.48.45 PM.png
  3. pineygroveshop

    pineygroveshop Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2008
    Oddometer:
    138
    Location:
    Fuquay Varina
    Had my first flat two weeks ago. Nail in the rear tire. Had a spare tube with me and swapped it out on the side of the road.
    Eatmore Mudd and TCBronson like this.
  4. ScottFree

    ScottFree Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,185
    Location:
    Ill-Annoy
    At my age, waking up to a flat rear has nothing to do with tires! :lol3
    I assume you have your own tire tools, as they’re not part of the stock kit!

    When I swapped my tires a couple months ago, I did all the wheel R&R using the stock kit. No problems. Tools aren’t shop quality, but the kit is pretty complete. Good luck!
  5. blender

    blender Just another rider

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2004
    Oddometer:
    1,266
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Today I *think* I completed my 1st valve adjust on the Himalayan. I say *think* as haven't yet fired it up, as long as the tank is off I need to run wiring for a GPS.

    For background: My bike now has 501 miles on it (yeah, that's pathetic). I wanted the 300 mile service done by the local dealer simply have a record it was done. This local dealer is a new RE dealer, my Himalayan is the first RE they had in for service. I won't give their name away, however for those in the Madison WI area the initials start with "Englehart Motorsports". Ahem.

    The service manager printed out the RE service sheet. We then had a discussion at social distancing distances on what the service should cover. I did point out the break-in service should cover valve inspection, etc. We discussed this further. They wore me down. I decided it was easier if I did my own valve check. So, I waited until I racked up another 200 miles to check the valves.

    I've done tappet adjusts on BMW airhead and oilhead bikes; those are sorta hanging out there and are easy to access. The Himma, less so. At least on my '19 EFI. Damn those wires and hoses.

    I didn't find locating TDC compression difficult. I did pull the inspection plug and use that while watching the valves cycle. I do admit while watching the cycle I have to use the suck/squeeze/bang/blow mantra.

    Exhaust side wasn't too bad for access. I was trying out a Motion Pro tappet adjust tool and a 2nd tool from Ebay. The MP tool worked "ok", access was still a bit fiddly. Valve was a bit tight so I'm glad I checked.

    Inlet tappet was much less fun. In retrospect all the YT videos I've watched must have been videoed on the carbed models, in those videos there was a lot more room to work with. Trying to get the feeler gauge in was like a first attempt at, oh never mind. Let's just say there were several attempts before success.

    The tappet was tight. Trying to adjust it using various tools was, let's say, a wee bit frustrating. The wiring, hoses, lack of light all contributed. Oh, and here's a Pro Tip: Don't use the MP tappet tool on the inlet side. The chromed tool, oily fingers, fiddly location *might*, and I'm saying this hypothetically, *might* lead to an experience where the loose MP tappet adjustment part is dropped into the header cover. You do not want to do that. I'm speaking hypothetically. For a friend of mine.

    If you should drop a MP tappet adjuster into the header cover I have on good authority that a small magnetic parts probe will work. I used my LED bore light to locate the dogGamn MP part. I'm passing along the information as a hypothetical situation. Because this never happened to me. But my $7 LED bore light has been one of my best purchases. But I never used it in this capacity.

    While buttoning things up: all the timing plug, valve covers, reconnecting connectors I disconnected to provide room I realized where the F did I put the spark plug? Damn! Where the F did I put it? Nope, not on the workbench. Where the F did I put it?

    Ah yes, check the last place it was. I had shoved it back into the plug cap, thinking it was safe there. Sigh.

    So: Need to test GPS connection, reconnect fuel tank (and remember which hose goes to which connector), and restart bike. Without explosions. To be continued......
  6. cwadej

    cwadej Keeper of the truth

    Joined:
    May 20, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,236
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    the only flat tire I remember having was just after I got my himma. put TKC-80's on it and headed for the trails. about 1/2 mile from dirt it went flat.
    part of the motion pro rim protector had broken off and cut/stabbed the tube. I didnt notice the missing chunk on the protector. Wife had to bring me the tube and pump :(
    Eatmore Mudd, kitkat and TCBronson like this.
  7. kitkat

    kitkat Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2003
    Oddometer:
    577
    Location:
    california
    I just did the front twice and the rear three times, and it wasn’t for practice!

    First, I installed my new Tusk tire on the rear with a new tube, then replaced the front with new tusk tire and reused they tube. Then I look at my punctured tube and see the flared washer and nut at the bottom of the stem...oh that’s what that was for!


    I only needed to redo the rear and it went faster this time.

    Went for a ride on my new knobby tires and wow do they feel snaky! I can feel the knobs and in the turns the bike wants to stand upright and not lean. I was not comfortable on these tires at all! I know they need some breaking but they aren’t for me!

    I rode home and put my original tires back on. This time I changed both in about 45 min total.

    Anyone in Santa Barbara area want a good deal on some new tires?
    Eatmore Mudd likes this.
  8. sqeeezy

    sqeeezy Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 12, 2019
    Oddometer:
    441
    Location:
    Southern Spain
    Good luck. Obviously, the bike tools don't include tyre levers. I travel with a short n medium fairly middling quality set/pair from my local hardware store which i cleaned up a bit with a file to make it smoother on the tyre beads and hopefully less prone to nip the inner tube, and a big lever'cause I had it already.
    I got one front flat in a blah thousand km trip and it was a thorn, not that big but it went through the very tough Mitas E07 and the tube. I did need all three levers but three good quaity short ones, like 6", would have been fine. BTW it was a pig mounting the rear Mitas E07 when I first fitted them and I advise Tibetan breath control, plenty of lube and find the best YouTube videos. I had to give up on the rear, leave it, watch the correct vid and succeed with it the following day.
    Oh, and on that trip I rounded off a tappet cover bolt head and couldn't get the bugger off with the stock box spanner, because a) the bolts are made of Dinky Toy metal and b) I'd used a real socket on it when I'd (cough) overtightened it just a smidgeon back at home before I set off, so yes, it's a good idea to pre-emptively find the weaknesses of the stock toolkit.
  9. kitkat

    kitkat Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2003
    Oddometer:
    577
    Location:
    california
    I replaced most of the tools with better lighter tools and added to it. My tire levers are the motion pro aluminum lever/wrench combo.

    Before last light I had a pouch with tools for tire work PLUS other tools but after I was done I realized the tire/wheel kit needs to be ONLY tire/wheel tools.

    Changing a tube out in the “world” (not in my garage) where it’s on dirt and weather could be bad, I realized I want nothing that I don’t need in that pouch. The fewer gadgets to keep track of the better!

    I did it 5 times last night, wearing flip flops, and that was swapped tires not just tubes. Not the most fun you can have that’s for sure!
    Eatmore Mudd likes this.
  10. mettalique

    mettalique Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2012
    Oddometer:
    425
    Location:
    Mt Mee, QLD Australia
    or old Landrover with whitworth
    little ackman and Eatmore Mudd like this.
  11. Randy

    Randy Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2002
    Oddometer:
    6,240
    Location:
    Newnan, GA USA
    Yes, that intake valve is a bitch to get to. And I have it on good authority, from a friend, that it's also possible to drop a feeler gauge down inside the rocker cover and have it disappear where it can't be seen. I've also heard that if one is really, really lucky, a magnetic pick-up tool just might be strong enough to make it leap up and stick before the magnet sticks too all the other steel bits in there. Of course, I'm not saying that I've ever actually seen such a thing, but I have heard that it's happened to at least one guy... Take it for what it's worth. After hearing about this possibility, no matter how implausible it may sound, I ran a length of para cord through the holes in the gauges that I use on the Himalayan to make sure it never happens to me.... Cause, I had... I mean, my friend had JUST finished reinstalling the rocker cover after retorquing the head, and was checking the valves when it happened to him. I'd hate to have to pull the cover again to get a feeler gauge out of there....
  12. blender

    blender Just another rider

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2004
    Oddometer:
    1,266
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Ya know, more hypothetical events happen around this motorcycle than at a theoretical physics seminar.....


    *** Immediately goes out to garage to inventory feeler gauges.
    sqeeezy, Eatmore Mudd and Randy like this.
  13. cwadej

    cwadej Keeper of the truth

    Joined:
    May 20, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,236
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    that's why i have my feelers and 3mm wrench all on a long string
    Loadtoad101 and Eatmore Mudd like this.
  14. Randy

    Randy Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2002
    Oddometer:
    6,240
    Location:
    Newnan, GA USA
    Oh yeah, for sure! But it's not just with the Himalayan. I've been wrenching on bikes for a long time, and I have a lot of klutzes for friends and acquaintances... Obviously all of my projects go perfectly as planned. 'Cause I'm an excellent mechanic and have never made a mistake while working on a bike. But, I've heard of all sorts of things going awry. All sorts of weird shit has happened with various friends. Some of them are just unlucky, and some of them really probably should step away from the tool chest.... I could probably write a book about all the stories I've heard from friends over the years working on a wide range of things, from motorcycles, to other types of machines, to home projects, etc... Maybe I'm lucky, or maybe I'm just really good, I don't know... But shit always goes my way when I do projects of any sort. I guess maybe I should have been a Rocket Surgeon, a brain scientist, or something else really cool that requires perfection every time...

    But, yeah, a length of string can be your best friend sometimes... :thumb
    GeeMan67, Doctor T, modiorne and 2 others like this.
  15. rockt

    rockt Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2003
    Oddometer:
    3,264
    Location:
    Canada
    I have a friend who drained the oil out of one of his Airheads once, put a new filter in, replaced the drain plug, got the new oil out and then... took a phone call and was called out to do something else. Got back to the bike a few days later and started 'er up. I, er, I mean he, luckily noticed the full oil jug sitting there, put 2 & 2 together and shut it down before the engine grenaded. Lucky but...:doh
    aussie dubber, blender and zookster like this.
  16. Randy

    Randy Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2002
    Oddometer:
    6,240
    Location:
    Newnan, GA USA
    That's a good one! Distraction and absentmindedness is the cause of a lot of big mistakes. I know that I often take a while to finish a wrenching task so that sometimes it may be even a whole week (or more in larger projects) before things are finished. While I've never had a friend that this has happened to, and it's never happened to me, my general precaution against such an oversight is to take the key out of the ignition and use a piece of duct tape to tape it to the oil bottle before I even begin the work. Then the key is left there until everything is done, at which time it is removed from the empty bottle and returned to the ignition. On dirt bikes without keys, I'd tie a piece of colored ribbon to the grip or somewhere that I'd see it in the starting position. Don't have a bike like that these days, but I've always found a way to at least try to prevent one of my klutz friends from starting a bike that didn't yet have oil in it...

    When working on larger bike projects, I use the ribbon trick for various important nuts and bolts that haven't been installed or torqued yet. Sometimes it's necessary to install a sub-assembly of some sort before you're ready to really install it. The little bows of ribbon is a reminder that something hasn't been completed.
    fe2cruz likes this.
  17. CaptainTrips

    CaptainTrips Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2019
    Oddometer:
    1,323
    Location:
    Vancouver(ish)
    See pic attached. The socket is a 3/8 inch head (not metric) and the thread is more course, but I forgot to actually measure it before I reassembled the bike. The red paint reminds me which bolt goes where.

    Attached Files:

  18. Loadtoad101

    Loadtoad101 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2017
    Oddometer:
    742
    Location:
    Livingston TN
    I had the same feelings when I put mine on. You get used to it. The snakiness (is that a word) kind of surprises you at first but just let it flow. It happens whenever you hit a ridge in the road. The tires are big and are kind of like gyroscopes and want to keep the bike upright, but you just have to lean a little harder in the turns. You get used to it. What you should have done get the bike in the dirt and you would have loved the tires.
    laurient, Randy, Kiwi59 and 1 other person like this.
  19. MitchMan

    MitchMan Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2007
    Oddometer:
    77
    Location:
    England, UK
    Not sure if this is new information, but I have spoken to the Royal Enfield distributors in the UK (MotoGB) in the last few days.

    They now have the new Lava Red and Lake Blue Himalayans in the UK, however they ARE NOT BS6 versions with the switchable ABS (which is a feature I want); they are simply BS4 versions with the new colour schemes/painted tanks.

    Key takeaway is that having a Himalayan in the new colours does not guarantee the new features from the BS6.

    The wait goes on...

    MitchMan
    Eatmore Mudd likes this.
  20. Randy

    Randy Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2002
    Oddometer:
    6,240
    Location:
    Newnan, GA USA
    I have a feeling they're likely to use up all older parts stock for new production bikes before widespread changes other than to countries that have regulations that required specific updates. I'd think that once older parts stocks have been depleted on certain items those newer designs will start appearing in other countries as well, as in many cases it's more cost effective to build bikes one way for everyone rather than have different things for each individual market. Of course, this would depend on regulatory requirements of each market. Similar to the way some markets still got carb models when the ones in the US were FI, etc. Cosmetic changes like paint colors are likely much shorter lead time items and are able to be rolled out much sooner at no real cost since it's a marketing decision only and has no regulatory drivers involved. When I bought my 2020, the only colors available were the same as those of the 2019 models. No switchable ABS either, although, at some point I look for the newer colors as well as the ABS switch to be available here as well... Of course, this is all just speculation that I pulled out of my ass, so take it for what it's worth....
    Kiwi59 and Eatmore Mudd like this.