Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    I tend to agree. A well setup carb can be just as good as modern EFI. And ten years ago, I would have said that EFI has no chance of being as good as a well setup carb. EFI has finally gotten good, but it took a long time for that to happen on bikes. And if you go back through this thread, I believe that most of the issues people have had have been related to the EFI... All the hard starting, stalling, etc... Pretty easily resolved with a good carb setup. No need to spend $300 for a controller, and hook up a laptop. $10 worth of brass, a little knowledge, and you're good to go. Plus, carb issues, when/if they happen, can usually be fixed on the side of the road. Simple mechanical devices. Especially with gravity feed systems that don't even need a fuel pump. EFI? Not so much. If not for the ever tightening emission regulations, we'd all still be riding happily along on carb'd bikes. I'm not anti-EFI, but I still own more carb'd bikes than EFI. And if I'd have had the option on the Himalayan, I'll let your guess which I would have chosen...
    sam2019 and Eatmore Mudd like this.
  2. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    The carbed' Himalayans that RENA imported in 2017 for market testing passed EPA tests. Consumer response during the market testing was heavily lop sided in favor of EFI so that's what we got.
  3. johnny42

    johnny42 Been here awhile

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    I'm not in attack mode and I've made a similar observation on the internal combustion engine in general but creeps, no one has been able to perfect it in 63 years???

    From wikipedia...... The first commercial EFI system was the "Electrojector" developed by Bendix and was offered by American Motors Corporation (AMC) in 1957
  4. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    I have three Himas, all carb, for the reasons given, but I have to also acknowledge that the stator of the BS3/carb Hima is flawed and fails regularly when going long distance fast (probably burns out due to overheating).
    This has been fixed in the EFI stator but they are incompatible. so you have made the right choice in a country with good fuel to boot.
  5. Solera

    Solera Adventurer

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    The best thing I like about a bike with a good EFI system is better cold starts and minimal to no warm up. In the manual for my old K100RT it basically says to not bother warming it up, just start and ride off, but take it easy for the first few minutes.
    I find with the Himalayan I still like/need to let it warm up before riding off. No big deal as I get the gear on while that happens. I was originally going to get the carb'd version but decided I'd like the ABS and didn't want the bother of the stator failure. Plus some of the other bugs should have been worked out (or so I hoped). Since OZ and NZ have both it could be something to think about after the warranty is gone. Though rolling an EFI back to carb would probably be illegal due to emission standards.
    Maybe I should buy a DR650 or DRZ400 before they can't be sold here anymore. That being said I have never had a problem with an EFI bike. Balancing 4 cantankerous carbs on an old Honda though, ggrrr.
  6. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    I like carb, that said my next Hima will be EFI, it is the future and I will have to learn my way around it with our engine mods. and also ABS is quite useful on some of the roads here and with those hard rubber rigs we drive. I will make sure to have a switch OFF when entering the mountains.
  7. Doctor T

    Doctor T Gruppy old git

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    Personally i prefer Carberettors. So easy to adjust and fix as long as they are well made from the start. EFI is good, don't get me wrong but when things go wrong with the system it is hard and expensive to repair. Like all modern vehical gadgets EFI was designed for F1 racing cars. That was OK as they could just plug a computer in and the car was back on the track in minutes but their system cost millions. As it has dropped down to every car/bike use it now seems to be a locked down unit which a Home mechanic isn't able to fix without spending thousands on Tec equipment. How is Joe Bloggs going to fix it to smooth running if the manufactors cant. My Tiger 1050 went back to Triumph 5 times before it ran correctly. So Carbs for me. A couple of screwdrivers, replacement jets that all i need to fix one. I must say i hear that it's the more expencive bikes that have problems with EFI running. My EFI Himmie runs 100% better that the Tiger
    Randy likes this.
  8. confusiontactic

    confusiontactic Adventurer

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    Love this bike, but she's a real pig on the steep and loose

    Attached Files:

  9. LogHouseBikers

    LogHouseBikers Been here awhile Supporter

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    I echo your thoughts. I can take my carb apart road-side and fix it (and have many times) . I have succumbed to EFI only because the future is what it is. I do admit the convenience of EFI...
  10. HaveACuppaTea

    HaveACuppaTea Adventurer

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    Some might say that you can take your carb apart road-side and fix it is because you have to!
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  11. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    considering EFI failures are massively more common, in particular the fuel pump, I do not know where you take this from.
    I never had to road-side maintain a carb. the only new carbs I had to buy where due to my own stupidity - leaving them full of really bad fuel for month parked and as a result the internal thin fuel lines where clogged.
    It could have been cleaned I guess but I was under time restrains. the only moving part that may need replacing after 30 or so tkm costs 15 dollars. Compare that to the fuel pump 80 dollars or the EFI system 250 dollars.
    It is the future, but not because it is better in any great way. And re: engine upgrades: I still do not know a single person who could make his own mapping but I know any number who can change a jet in a carb, including me.
    Randy likes this.
  12. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Knock on wood, but in close to 45 years of riding, I can't say that I've ever had to pull a carb off on the side of the road. Generally speaking, in my experience, there's very little to actually fail on a carburetor. The only issues I've ever had have been due to either age, and/or neglect and these things tend to manifest themselves when I've left bikes sitting unattended for longer periods of time, and where I didn't take the proper steps to store them away. And then there's issues with the tanks... crap, rust, whatever, can clog jets and cause problems. Again, proper maintenance solves these issues as well. And of course, I always run a decent inline filter these days too. On bikes that I ride at least somewhat regularly, I've never really had an issue with the carbs.

    With that said, I've had less experience with EFI bikes, but I haven't had any issues with the ones I do own.

    But, I still like the KISS principle. And the EFI system is FAR more complex. With a computer, multiple sensors, plugs, fuel pump, injectors, etc, there's just more potential points of failure, IMO. With that said, I realize that modern EFI is very reliable. Reliable enough that I really don't concern myself with it. And I'm not anti-EFI.

    All the same, IF something does go wrong with a carb, I CAN fix it myself. EFI, maybe, maybe not.

    I guess I'm just old enough to appreciate mechanical simplicity that works, over tech that does nothing better other than being tech.

    Liquid cooling also has advantages over air cooling. But, it also brings it's own complexity, and more things to go wrong. In the case of the Himalayan, I'm just really glad that it's air cooled. :thumb

    And of course, it depends on the application... While I know I'll never actually break down in some exotic land across the globe, in the real world, I still like the idea that if I DID, that my simple air cooled carbureted bike could possibly be fixed in some little shed in some small remote village by the local mechanic, or by myself, whereas the latest greatest high tech bike would be waiting for parts to be shipped from abroad... IF I could even figure out what it needed....

    But yeah, this are modern times, and modern times required adaptation. Carburetors and the bikes that use them are sadly a dying breed. Even still, I bought the Himalayan not because it had EFI, but rather that that was the only option available to me if I indeed wanted a Himalayan. If I'd have had the option, I would have picked a carb.

    I'd guess that my issues with EFI are more imagined than real, but all the same, I still do like a simple, mechanical device that I understand, and can fix myself....
    Beemerboff likes this.
  13. sqeeezy

    sqeeezy Been here awhile

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    LOOSE FRONT SPROCKET NUT ALERT

    Today, when I went to remove the 30 mm AF nut on the front sprocket, to fit my 14t sprocket, I noticed it had slipped relative to the tab washer, which had lost its (I guess) original well hammered-in form. The point of the nut was where a flat should have been. I hadn’t looked closely at it previously when I’d changed the chains (twice). My bad. The nut was noticeably not tight enough. Just a thing to keep an eye on. It hadn't been touched since it left the factory. I gave the tab washer a good forming against the flat, once I'd tightened up the nut.

    First impression of 14 tooth sprocket is how smoother the bike felt, and nice to be in second easily where I would’ve been revving in first before.
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  14. Brainburn

    Brainburn Adventurer

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    Installed and loving it.

    I am going to order 2 more for my son's bikes.

    Kind of hard to tell the cant of the bike but, it is significantly better than stock.

    20200918_094748.jpg 20200918_100030 1.jpg
  15. Brainburn

    Brainburn Adventurer

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    Have an update [UPDATE again].

    I went out and was messing around with my clutch to rule out most everything else before I tore into it and replaced it with the HD clutch.

    I noticed the play in the clutch arm (on the engine, not lever on handlebar) and it was tight even after my roadside adjustment. I fully relaxed the tension on the arm and started adjusting up from there. After taking my time and adjusting the clutch, for feel and complete disengagement when pulled, I finished with about 4-5 threads looser (is that a word?) than my initial roadside adjustment.

    In other words; slipping clutch at factory setting, roadside adjustment to specs to get home and still really tight. Adjusted so I have about 1/3 lever play before it engages = no slipping so far.
    I will load the bike down and let you guys know after I get some more miles on it and stress it pretty good.


    More to follow I guess....

    [Update 2.1]

    Slipping like a mofo. Gonna have to replace the clutch. Soaking my plates now.

    Mike
    Eatmore Mudd likes this.
  16. Rocky Mountain Motos

    Rocky Mountain Motos On a long leash

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    My first review from the wild! Glad you like it!
  17. Beemerboff

    Beemerboff Long timer

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    Found the nut slack when I changed to a 14T too, but my tab washer was working as intended, the nut had never been torqued properly.
    I went 14/40 as the 80 Km/Hr limited back roads and tracks I ride on start at my front gate.
    And the state limit is generally 100 Km/Hr .
    Most new bikes these days are over geared as the noise restrictions they have to comply with include a ride by test and this is easier to pass if the motor is revving a bit slower.
  18. CaptainTrips

    CaptainTrips Been here awhile

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    Hmm... sounds like a good argument for EFI... ;)
  19. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    no doubt there are really complex carbs where you have to study mechanical engineering to adjust them but the Hima type is not one of them. Unless you play with jetting there are only 2 screws you can adjust.
    Lets not forget that 2 relatively different engines, the 500cc Bullet and the 410cc Himalayan use exactly the same carb, down to the jetting.
    Likewise we ran the 477 engines with OEM carb settings.
    In the early days of Bullet EFI it was not uncommon for people to buy a "carburetor set" even now available on amazon and convert them back to carb.
    However EFI has gotten really reliable and even the Hima fuel pump went thru 2 revisions and is now solid, at least thats what I heard.
  20. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    Only if the previous dip-shit owner never "fixed" it or subsequent owners didn't neglect it. Carbs not fooled with and drained at the end of the riding season last as long as the engines they came on or nearly so.
    Kiwiscoot, Randy and FEG32 like this.